What do these clips have in common?

Save this PDF as:
Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "What do these clips have in common?"

Transcription

1 What do these clips have in common? (Avatar) &feature=related (Pirates of the Caribbean) (Braveheart) Speeches 1

2 Unit 1, Part 2: The Right to Be Free (Age of Reason) Part 1: The events that led up to Patrick Henry s Speech at the Virginia Convention and the Declaration of Independence. Part 2: Examining the types of persuasion techniques that Patrick Henry and Thomas Jefferson used. 2

3 The Colonists in the early 1700 s Years after the British Puritans established colonies in America, and the Salem Witch trials took place in Massachusetts (1692), the American colonists were mostly content to be under British rule. However, tensions grew after the French and Indian War. 3

4 What started the French and Indian War? France and England had competing claims for land in North America. The French occupied land in the Mid-West, and the British colonies wanted the French to leave. The countries also competed over trade issues with the Native Americans in the disputed region. This led to the French and Indian War. 4

5 French and Indian War, continued Colonists fought for the British, while the Native Americans fought for the French. The war lasted from The British won, receiving all lands east of the Mississippi River, except New Orleans. 5

6 Resentments Begin Although the British won the war, they were deeply in debt. They demanded more revenue from the colonies. Colonists were taxed to pay the war cost, which started the resentment of the Colonists against the British. 6

7 Proclamation of 1763 Colonists were not allowed to settle the land they helped win for England. In 1763 the British created the Proclamation of 1763 that prohibited settlement beyond the Appalachian Mountains. While Britain did not intend to harm the colonists, many colonists took offense at this order. 7

8 Colonists Begin to Protest During , the British enforced the Sugar Act, the Currency Act, the Quartering Act, and the Stamp Act to tax and put limitations on the colonists. Colonists grew angry and the colonist merchants began a boycott of British goods. Secret societies began to form such as the Sons of Liberty to protest. Parliament repealed the Stamp Act, but imposed the Declaration Act, which gave parliament supreme authority to govern the colonies. 8

9 More British Actions The British also imposed the Townshend Acts. These acts placed taxes on goods such as glass, paper, paint, lead, and tea. In order to enforce the act, British officers use writs of assistance to enter homes or businesses to search for smuggled goods. Colonists saw the Townshend Acts as a serious threat to their rights and freedoms. 9

10 Tools of Protest To protest the Townshend Acts, colonists formed another boycott of British goods. This boycott was formed by Samuel Adams - leader of the Sons of Liberty. Sons of Liberty pressured shopkeepers not to sell imported goods (those from Britain). Daughters of Liberty called on colonists to weave their own cloth and use American products. 10

11 The Boston Massacre (March 5,1770) A fight between British troops and citizens of Boston (the Patriots) broke out. British troops fired on the Patriots, killing 5 people. Sons of Liberty called the shooting the Boston Massacre. 11

12 Boston Tea Party The Tea Act of 1773 gave the British East India Company control over the American tea trade. Protests broke out everywhere. December 16, 1773, a group of men disguised as Indians boarded three tea ships and destroyed 342 chests of tea. The colonists thought that the Boston Tea Party would show Britain how much they opposed taxation without representation. 12

13 Britain Fights Back Because of the Boston Tea Party many in Britain called for the Americans to be knocked about their ears. King George III said, We must master them or totally leave them to themselves and treat them like aliens. Britain decided to master the colonies and passed a series of laws to punish the colonists. British called these new laws the Coercive Acts, but they were so harsh that the colonist called them the Intolerable Acts. 13

14 First Continental Congress In September 1774, delegates from all colonies except Georgia met in Philadelphia. The delegates held out hope that they could restore the colonies relationship with Great Britain. They sent formal petitions to King George III and the British people, asking for their rights as British subjects. 14

15 Second Virginia Provincial Convention The colonists met again in March of 1775 to vote on whether Virginia should take up arms to defend against a feared British attack. Patrick Henry, the most famous orator of the American Revolution, delivered a fiery speech to convince delegates of the need for armed resistance. 15

16 Common Sense (1776) Common Sense was a pamphlet written by Thomas Paine that helped convince thousands of colonists to support independence from Great Britain. 16

17 Declaration of Independence By the spring of 1776, many colonial Americans believed that the only solution to the conflict was to break away from British rule. At the Second Continental Congress held in Philadelphia, a five-member committee was appointed to draft an official statement of the reasons for independence. 17

18 Declaration of Independence, continued Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, Robert Livingston and Thomas Jefferson were the appointed committee. Jefferson was chosen to write the declaration for two reasons: 1) He was a very good writer. 2) He was from Virginia. After voting for independence on July 2, the full Congress debated the Declaration for two days, making a few more changes before adopting it on July 4. 18

19 Four Main Parts of the Declaration of Independence Preamble - Announces the reason for the document. Declaration of people s natural rights and relationship to government. List of unfair acts of George III, the British king. Conclusion that formally states America s independence from Britain. 19

20 Changes from the Puritan Age to the Age of Reason: The Puritan Legacy For the Puritans God was in everything. He was their Creator, Redeemer, Judge and Helper. The American moral fiber is based on the Puritan beginning in the fear of God and obedience to Scripture. This is the legacy that the Puritans left behind in their values and literature. 20

21 Changes from the Puritan Age to the Age of Reason: The Age of Reason Legacy Goal: to gain independence from England People during this time period believed that God was a person who had put Natural Law in the world to govern it. In other words, this is much like a clockmaker who winds up a clock and then walks away, leaving it to do what it is designed to do. Legacy: Independence from England and the Constitution of the United States. 21

22 Part 2: Persuasive Techniques What types of persuasion did Patrick Henry use to urge Americans to fight against the British? What types of persuasion did Thomas Jefferson use in the Declaration of Independence? 22

23 Persuasive Rhetoric Rhetoric is the art of communicating ideas. Persuasive rhetoric consists of reasoned arguments in favor of or against particular beliefs or courses of action. To be effectively persuasive, a work generally has to engage both the mind and the emotions of its audience. The writer needs to show that his or her position has a firm moral basis. The Declaration of Independence provides examples of the three basic types of appeals used in persuasive arguments: 1) logical appeals, 2) emotional appeals, and 3) ethical appeals.

24 Logical Appeals Provide rational arguments to support a claim. Example: the assumption that all men are created equal is supported with objective evidence such as the list of injuries and usurpations committed by King George III. A writer can develop an argument 1) deductively, by beginning with a generalization, or premise, and proceeding to marshal examples and facts that support it or 2) inductively by beginning with examples or facts and proceeding to draw a conclusion from them. 24

25 Emotional Appeals Often based on specific examples of suffering or potential threats. Example: Jefferson s statement that King George is attempting to complete the works of death, desolation, and tyranny. Also include loaded language language that is rich in connotations and vivid images. 25

26 Ethical Appeals Based on shared moral values or experience. Calls forth the audience s sense of right, justice, and virtue. The author s credibility is also an element of this type of appeal. Why should the audience listen to this person? Why is this person s opinion valued over another s? How is person s opinion or experience fit in with the topic or situation? 26

27 Ethical Appeals Example: Jefferson reminded people that independence was a last resort, after the failure of other measures: In every stage of these oppressions we have petitioned for redress, in the most humble terms; our repeated petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. Jefferson is using a sense of justice for his ethical appeal. Also, Jefferson is a credible source because of his persona as an important political leader of the time period. 27

28 Styles of Persuasion Elevated Language This is the use of formal words and phrases that can lend a serious tone to a discussion. Example: The powerful empire of nature is no longer surrounded by prejudice, fanaticism, superstition, and lies. The flame of truth has dispersed all the clouds of folly and usurpation. Olympe de Gouges 28

29 Styles of Persuasion Rhetorical Questions This is the use of questions that don t require answers. Writers pose rhetorical questions to show that their arguments make the answers obvious. Example: Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Patrick Henry 29

30 Styles of Persuasion Repetition This is repeating a point that tells the audience that it is especially important. It can also be the repetition of a form of expression that tells the audience that the ideas expressed in the same way are related. 30

31 Styles of Persuasion Parallelism This is a form of repetition; it is used very effectively in The Declaration of Independence. Example: We hold these truths to be self-evident: - That all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 31

Proclamation of French and Indian War. Sugar Act

Proclamation of French and Indian War. Sugar Act Proclamation of 1763 French and Indian War Sugar Act Official announcement made by King George III of England which stopped colonists from settling lands west of the Appalachian Mountains. War fought by

More information

Reading Essentials and Study Guide

Reading Essentials and Study Guide Lesson 2 Uniting for Independence ESSENTIAL QUESTION Why and how did the colonists declare independence? Reading HELPDESK Academic Vocabulary draft outline or first copy consent permission or approval

More information

8th Grade History. American Revolution

8th Grade History. American Revolution 8th Grade History American Revolution BOARD QUESTIONS 1) WHAT DID THE SPANISH WANT IN THE AMERICAS? 2) WHAT DID THE FRENCH WANT IN THE AMERICAS? 3) WHAT DID THE ENGLISH WANT IN THE AMERICAS? 4) HOW DID

More information

BACKGROUND Historically speaking, . There is NO. * brought to America *Native American depopulated due to

BACKGROUND Historically speaking, . There is NO. * brought to America *Native American depopulated due to BACKGROUND Historically speaking,. There is NO. COLONIZATION Impact *Columbus Claims New World for * established * English Colonies Created * brought to America *Native American depopulated due to Motive

More information

England and the 13 Colonies: Growing Apart

England and the 13 Colonies: Growing Apart England and the 13 Colonies: Growing Apart The 13 Colonies: The Basics 1607 to 1776 Image: Public Domain Successful and Loyal Colonies By 1735, the 13 colonies are prosperous and growing quickly Colonists

More information

Study Guide for Test representative government system of government in which voters elect representatives to make laws for them

Study Guide for Test representative government system of government in which voters elect representatives to make laws for them Study Guide for Test 4 1. In general, who could vote in the English colonies? Free men, over 21 years old, who owned a certain amount of land. Sometimes had to be church members. 2. representative government

More information

To run away or leave someone in their time of need.

To run away or leave someone in their time of need. Desert To run away or leave someone in their time of need. Inflation Rapid rise in prices. Blockade Barrier preventing the movement of troops and supplies. Tributary River or stream that flows into a larger

More information

The Sun Never Sets on the British Empire.

The Sun Never Sets on the British Empire. Britain was in bad shape financially By 1763, British citizens were the most heavily taxed people in the world. Britain s empire was massive and expensive to maintain. The colonies in America were prospering.

More information

Chapter 5 Place & Time: The British Colonies

Chapter 5 Place & Time: The British Colonies Chapter 5 Place & Time: The British Colonies 1763-1776 Lesson 1 No Taxation Without Representation Essential Question: Name: Core: Date: Dealing with Great Britain Enforcing Trade Laws The Sugar Act _

More information

Learning Goal 5: Students will be able to explain the events which led to the start of the American

Learning Goal 5: Students will be able to explain the events which led to the start of the American American Revolution Learning Goal 5: Students will be able to explain the events which led to the start of the American Revolution. - Tea Act (Boston Tea Party, British East India Company, Sons of Liberty,

More information

The Americans (Reconstruction to the 21st Century)

The Americans (Reconstruction to the 21st Century) The Americans (Reconstruction to the 21st Century) Chapter 2: TELESCOPING THE TIMES Revolution and the Early Republic CHAPTER OVERVIEW Colonists declare their independence and win a war to gain the right

More information

Revolution in Thought 1607 to 1763

Revolution in Thought 1607 to 1763 Revolution in Thought 1607 to 1763 Early settlers found they disliked England America was far from England and isolated Weakened England s authority Produced rugged and independent people Colonies had

More information

Chapter 2: Origins of American Government Section 2

Chapter 2: Origins of American Government Section 2 Chapter 2: Origins of American Government Section 2 Objectives 1. Explain how Britain s colonial policies contributed to the growth of self-government in the colonies. 2. Identify the major steps that

More information

Causes of the American Revolution

Causes of the American Revolution Causes of the American Revolution French and Indian War, 1754-1763 The French were envious of the successful colonies established by Great Britain and wanted a piece of that success. Thus, with the assistance

More information

Rat in the Bucket review game Unit 2. Foundations of American Government

Rat in the Bucket review game Unit 2. Foundations of American Government Rat in the Bucket review game Unit 2 Foundations of American Government QUESTION 1 We mutually pledge our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor This quote from the Declaration of Independence is considered.

More information

WHY DID AMERICAN COLONISTS WANT TO FREE THEMSELVES FROM GREAT BRITAIN?

WHY DID AMERICAN COLONISTS WANT TO FREE THEMSELVES FROM GREAT BRITAIN? 6 WHY DID AMERICAN COLONISTS WANT TO FREE THEMSELVES FROM GREAT BRITAIN? LESSON PURPOSE The growth of the American colonies raised issues with the parent country, Great Britain, that were difficult to

More information

Causes of the American Revolution

Causes of the American Revolution Causes of the American Revolution The Taxation Acts The King of England started taxing the colonists in the form of Taxation Acts in 1764. He felt that the colonists should bear the burden of the expense

More information

Declaration of. Independence. What is the Declaration of Independence? Key Leaders of the Time

Declaration of. Independence. What is the Declaration of Independence? Key Leaders of the Time Declaration of What is the Declaration of Independence? Independence * Key Leaders of the Time * People/Events * Significance to American Democracy by Patricia McNair Click for Video (4:00) Key Leaders

More information

These Intolerable Acts are NOT COOL bro.

These Intolerable Acts are NOT COOL bro. These Intolerable Acts are NOT COOL bro. Intolerable Acts -Parliament passes Coercive Act to punish Boston -Colonists called it the Intolerable acts -closed Boston harbor -suspended basic civil rights

More information

In your notes... What caused the American Revolution?

In your notes... What caused the American Revolution? In your notes... What caused the American Revolution? Unit Question Was the American Revolution truly revolutionary? Causes of the American Revolution In the news... Scotland is seeking independence from

More information

Chapter 5. Decision. Toward Independence: Years of

Chapter 5. Decision. Toward Independence: Years of Chapter 5 Toward Independence: Years of Decision 1763-1820 Imperial Reform, 1763-1765 The Great War for Empire 1754-1763 led to England replacing salutary neglect with. Why? The Legacy of War Disputes

More information

1- England Became Great Britain in the early 1700s. 2- Economic relationships Great Britain imposed strict control over trade.

1- England Became Great Britain in the early 1700s. 2- Economic relationships Great Britain imposed strict control over trade. 1- England Became Great Britain in the early 1700s 2- Economic relationships Great Britain imposed strict control over trade. Great Britain taxed the colonies after the French and Indian War Colonies traded

More information

American Revolution Study Guide

American Revolution Study Guide Events that Led to War French and Indian War Stamp Act Boston Massacre Sugar Act Townshend Acts Boston Tea Party Quartering Act Intolerable Acts boycott on British tea Important People Sons of Liberty

More information

Guided Reading Activity 5-1

Guided Reading Activity 5-1 Guided Reading Activity 5-1 DIRECTIONS: Recalling the Facts Use the information in your textbook to answer the questions. Use another sheet of paper if necessary. 1. In 1763 how did Great Britain try to

More information

An act which drew an imaginary line down spine of the Appalachian Mountains and closed lands west of the line off for colonial settlement.

An act which drew an imaginary line down spine of the Appalachian Mountains and closed lands west of the line off for colonial settlement. NC Text p. 167-173 Topic: The Road to Revolution Key Vocabulary & People: Pontiac Well respected Ottowa Indian leader (chief) who would organize Native American troops to fight against the British in Pontiac

More information

Complete the warm-up about Jefferson s quote

Complete the warm-up about Jefferson s quote Complete the warm-up about Jefferson s quote The 13 Colonies America: 13 colonies ruled by Great Britain (England) 1620-1783 European settlement initiated by Puritans & people seeking economic opportunities

More information

Chapter 4. The American Revolution

Chapter 4. The American Revolution Chapter 4 The American Revolution 1 Raising Taxes Sugar Act- The first tax passed specifically to raise money in the colonies, rather than regulate trade. To crack down on smugglers Help pay for French

More information

Second Nine Weeks Unit Essay

Second Nine Weeks Unit Essay Name: Date: Class Period: Due Date: Second Nine Weeks Unit Essay Background Information: By the mid-eighteenth century the thirteen American colonies, which were later to become the United States, contained

More information

British policy of ignoring the colonies. a replacement of a government by the people of that government. No government/chaos mob rule

British policy of ignoring the colonies. a replacement of a government by the people of that government. No government/chaos mob rule 1. Define revolution 2. Define tyranny 3. Define anarchy 4. Define salutary neglect a replacement of a government by the people of that government Total loss of freedom/absolute government power No government/chaos

More information

4: TELESCOPING THE TIMES

4: TELESCOPING THE TIMES The Americans (Survey) Chapter 4: TELESCOPING THE TIMES The War for Independence CHAPTER OVERVIEW The colonists clashes with the British government lead them to declare independence. With French aid, they

More information

2. Why did Franklin choose to make the head of the snake represent New England?

2. Why did Franklin choose to make the head of the snake represent New England? Critical Period Primary Sources Directions: Evaluate each of the following primary sources and answer the questions regarding colonial sentiments in the Critical Period leading up to the Revolutionary

More information

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence Declaration of Independence Reasons for Independence Over 100 years of the policy of salutary neglect by the British government (relaxed policies, allowed for self government in the colonies) French and

More information

SO WHAT EXACTLY HAPPENED? WHY WERE THE COLONIES SO UPSET THEY DECIDED TO OVERTHROW THEIR GOVERNMENT (TAKING JOHN LOCKE S ADVICE)?

SO WHAT EXACTLY HAPPENED? WHY WERE THE COLONIES SO UPSET THEY DECIDED TO OVERTHROW THEIR GOVERNMENT (TAKING JOHN LOCKE S ADVICE)? Guided Notes 3: The American Colonies and Great Britain Part II The Revolutionary War began as a disagreement over the way in which Great Britain treated the colonies versus the way the colonies felt they

More information

AMERICAN REVOLUTION STUDY GUIDE

AMERICAN REVOLUTION STUDY GUIDE RW Name: Period: Date: AMERICAN REVOLUTION STUDY GUIDE Directions: Sort the list of phrases into the correct categories in the chart below. To help finance the French and Indian War Colonists opposed taxes

More information

American Revolution Unit Packet

American Revolution Unit Packet American Revolution Unit Packet Name Period Learning Goals and Scales 0 Learning Goal 5: Students will be able to explain the events which led to the start of the American Revolution. - Tea Act (Boston

More information

11th. Section 1 Causes of the Revolution. Define: George Greenville. Non-importation agreements. Charles Townshend. Patrick Henry.

11th. Section 1 Causes of the Revolution. Define: George Greenville. Non-importation agreements. Charles Townshend. Patrick Henry. 1 Chapter 4 The American Revolution Reading Guide HW # 4 If I cannot read it I will not grade it. The more effort you put in now, the better in the long run! 11th Define: George Greenville Section 1 Causes

More information

The Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea Party American Revolution The Boston Tea Party The Night Boston Harbor Was Turned into a Giant Pot of Tea To learn about the Boston Tea Party, we will be doing a readers theater in class. In groups, you will

More information

Chapter 2:2: Declaring Independence

Chapter 2:2: Declaring Independence Chapter 2:2: Declaring Independence Objectives: 2:2 Our Political Beginnings o Students will explain how the relationship between the colonies and Great Britain changed during the pre- Revolutionary War

More information

Events Leading to the American Revolution

Events Leading to the American Revolution Events Leading to the American Revolution Colonization Main Reason was for Mercantilism: Making money for the mother country Joint-stock company: investors share ownership and profits Charters: grants

More information

Thanks so much for purchasing this product! Interactive Notebooks are an amazing way to get your students engaged and active in their learning! The graphic organizers and foldables in this resource are

More information

Foundations of the American Government

Foundations of the American Government Foundations of the American Government 1600s-1770s Each colony was loyal to Great Britain but was responsible for forming its own government, taxing and defending itself. The government and constitution

More information

American Revolution Unit Packet. Name Period

American Revolution Unit Packet. Name Period American Revolution Unit Packet Name Period 0 Learning Goals and Scales Learning Goal 5: Students will be able to explain the events which led to the start of the American Revolution. - Tea Act (Boston

More information

Unit 1 Review American Revolution Battle Notes, textbook pages

Unit 1 Review American Revolution Battle Notes, textbook pages TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9TH Unit 1 Review American Revolution Battle Notes, textbook pages 126-139. Planner: Unit 1 test tomorrow (review page & quizlet) UNIT 1 REVIEW 1. Based on your knowledge of Social Studies

More information

From Protest to Rebellion Constitutional Issues

From Protest to Rebellion Constitutional Issues From Protest to Rebellion Constitutional Issues Parliamentary Sovereignty: Only Parliament passes laws; it does not share this power with anyone. Were the colonies represented in Parliament? Yes: Virtual

More information

American Revolution Unit Packet. Name Period

American Revolution Unit Packet. Name Period American Revolution Unit Packet Name Period 0 Learning Goals and Scales Learning Goal 5: Students will be able to explain the events which led to the start of the American Revolution. - Tea Act (Boston

More information

Colonial Experience with Self-Government

Colonial Experience with Self-Government Read and then answer the questions at the end of the document Section 3 From ideas to Independence: The American Revolution The colonists gathered ideas about government from many sources and traditions.

More information

Directions: 1. Cut out the 10 events and paper clip them together for each student group (note: these are currently in the correct order now).

Directions: 1. Cut out the 10 events and paper clip them together for each student group (note: these are currently in the correct order now). Timeline to Revolution Directions: 1. Cut out the 10 events and paper clip them together for each student group (note: these are currently in the correct order now). 2. Give each student the two timeline

More information

Declaring Independence. ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What motivates people to act?

Declaring Independence. ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What motivates people to act? Declaring Independence ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What motivates people to act? The Second Continental Congress The decision to declare independence came only after all other options had been exhausted. Guiding

More information

Foundations of Government Test

Foundations of Government Test Match each item with its definition. a. democracy b. natural rights c. social contract d. boycott e. repeal 1. an agreement among people in a society with their government 2. to cancel a law 3. a government

More information

AMERICAN REVOLUTION. U.S. History Chapter 4

AMERICAN REVOLUTION. U.S. History Chapter 4 AMERICAN REVOLUTION U.S. History Chapter 4 The primary cause of economic differences among the colonies in North America was geography. Longer growing season in the South led to an agriculture-based economy.

More information

Scientific Revolution. 17 th Century Thinkers. John Locke 7/10/2009

Scientific Revolution. 17 th Century Thinkers. John Locke 7/10/2009 1 Scientific Revolution 17 th Century Thinkers John Locke Enlightenment an intellectual movement in 18 th Century Europe which promote free-thinking, individualism Dealt with areas such as government,

More information

American Revolution1 (7).notebook. September 23, Bell Ringers gmail Hand in homework

American Revolution1 (7).notebook. September 23, Bell Ringers gmail Hand in homework Bell Ringers gmail Hand in homework Objective: Students will be able to distinguish several examples of British actions and colonial reactions 1 The only representatives of the people of these colonies

More information

Name: Section: Date:

Name: Section: Date: Directions: Answer the following multiple choice questions. 1. In 1774, the first Continental Congress took place in what city? a. New York City b. Jamestown c. Philadelphia d. Boston I. The deteriorating

More information

Toward Independence: Years of Decision

Toward Independence: Years of Decision Chapter 5 Toward Independence: Years of Decision Salutary Neglect would give way to imperial authority! Problems Begin colonial troops treated poorly governors shared power army in peacetime Distance 1762

More information

7 th Grade US History Standard # Do Now Day #55

7 th Grade US History Standard # Do Now Day #55 Name Date: Course: US History/Ms. Brown Homeroom: 7 th Grade US History Standard # Do Now Day #55 Aims: SWBAT identify the purpose of the First Continental Congress, and describe two actions they took

More information

American Revolution Unit Packet. Name Period

American Revolution Unit Packet. Name Period American Revolution Unit Packet Name Period 0 Learning Goals and Scales Learning Goal 5: Students will be able to explain the events which led to the start of the American Revolution. - Tea Act (Boston

More information

Common Sense. A guide to the beginning of American Independence

Common Sense. A guide to the beginning of American Independence Common Sense A guide to the beginning of American Independence List of Events Leading to the American Revolution French & Indian War - fought between Britain and France over land in the Ohio River Valley;

More information

CHAPTER FOUR IMPERIAL WARS AND COLONIAL PROTEST

CHAPTER FOUR IMPERIAL WARS AND COLONIAL PROTEST UNIT TWO 1754-1816 CHAPTER FOUR IMPERIAL WARS AND COLONIAL PROTEST 1754-1774 Series of worldwide wars between Spain, France, and Great Britain Queen Anne s War (1702-1713) British gains* King George s

More information

CHAPTER SIX: FROM EMPIRE TO INDEPENDENCE,

CHAPTER SIX: FROM EMPIRE TO INDEPENDENCE, CHAPTER SIX: FROM EMPIRE TO INDEPENDENCE, 1750-1776 THE SEVEN YEARS WAR IN AMERICA The Albany Conference of 1754 Colonial Aims and Indian Interests Frontier Warfare The Conquest of Canada The Struggle

More information

1. Boston Massacre- The killing of 5 by British in 1770 became known as this. (Page 71 of Notes)

1. Boston Massacre- The killing of 5 by British in 1770 became known as this. (Page 71 of Notes) Study Guide- The American Revolution Vocabulary (Matching) 1. Boston Massacre- The killing of 5 by British in 1770 became known as this. (Page 71 of 2. Nathan Hale- American captured by the British, tried

More information

Unit 2 American Revolution

Unit 2 American Revolution Unit 2 American Revolution Name: Chapter 4 The Empire in Transition 1. Loosening Ties 1707 England + Scotland = a. A Tradition of Neglect i.growing Power of Parliament influence of Kings a. Robert Walpole

More information

Skills Debrief. Short Answer Questions:

Skills Debrief. Short Answer Questions: Skills Debrief Short Answer Questions: You guys did a great job! Each part was worth 5pts Most deductions were taken if the answer was generalized without having specific examples or without being explained

More information

STANDARD VUS.4c THE POLITICAL DIFFERENCES AMONG THE COLONISTS CONCERNING SEPARATION FROM BRITAIN

STANDARD VUS.4c THE POLITICAL DIFFERENCES AMONG THE COLONISTS CONCERNING SEPARATION FROM BRITAIN STANDARD VUS.4c THE POLITICAL DIFFERENCES AMONG THE COLONISTS CONCERNING SEPARATION FROM BRITAIN The ideas of the Enlightenment and the perceived unfairness of British policies provoked debate and resistance

More information

number of times you used the internet + times you used paper x.42 = $ you owe in taxes every day!

number of times you used the internet + times you used paper x.42 = $ you owe in taxes every day! Unit 2 SSUSH3 Analyze the causes of the Amer ican Revolution. a. Explain how the French and Indian War and the 1763 Treaty of Par is laid the groundwork for the Amer ican Revolution. Warm Up: Stamp Act

More information

Early US History Part 1. Your Notes. Goal 9/5/2012. How did the United States became a country?

Early US History Part 1. Your Notes. Goal 9/5/2012. How did the United States became a country? Questions / Themes 9/5/2012 Early US History Part 1 How did the United States became a country? Your Notes You will need these notes to prepare for exams. Remember to paraphrase and generalize. Avoid copying

More information

Hey, King: Get Off Our Backs!

Hey, King: Get Off Our Backs! Patrick Henry Give me liberty, or give me death! Really? Was it that bad? By 1776, the American colonists living under English rule thought so. In fact, things were so bad that they went to war to gain

More information

The Two Sides of the Declaration of Independence

The Two Sides of the Declaration of Independence Directions: The following question is based on the documents (A-F). Some of these documents have been edited. This assignment is designed to improve your ability to work with historical documents. As you

More information

Lecture Focus Question. Was the American War for Independence inevitable (unavoidable)? Why or why not? Explain.

Lecture Focus Question. Was the American War for Independence inevitable (unavoidable)? Why or why not? Explain. Lecture Focus Question Was the American War for Independence inevitable (unavoidable)? Why or why not? Explain. Lecture Focus Question Was the American War for Independence inevitable (unavoidable)? Why

More information

The American Revolution

The American Revolution Main Idea The American Revolution Enlightenment ideas led to revolution, independence, and a new government for the United States. Content Statement 6/Learning Goal Describe how Enlightenment thinkers

More information

Describe the methods the colonists used to protest British taxes. Understand the significance of the First Continental Congress in 1774.

Describe the methods the colonists used to protest British taxes. Understand the significance of the First Continental Congress in 1774. Objectives Describe the methods the colonists used to protest British taxes. Understand the significance of the First Continental Congress in 1774. Assess why Congress declared independence and the ideas

More information

and France in North America between 1754 and The French and Indian War was the American phase

and France in North America between 1754 and The French and Indian War was the American phase 1 Vocabulary Unit 2: New Beginnings United States: French & Indian War: French and Indian War definition. A series of military engagements between Britain and France in North America between 1754 and 1763.

More information

Complete the warm-up about Jefferson s quote

Complete the warm-up about Jefferson s quote Complete the warm-up about Jefferson s quote The 13 Colonies America: 13 colonies ruled by Great Britain (England) 1620-1783 European settlement initiated by Puritans & people seeking economic opportunities

More information

QUESTION: Are the colonists ungrateful whiners or are they standing up for their rights?

QUESTION: Are the colonists ungrateful whiners or are they standing up for their rights? The Road to Revolution Was it inevitable? QUESTION: Are the colonists ungrateful whiners or are they standing up for their rights? SALUTARY NEGLECT FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR ENDS 1763 France gives up all territory

More information

The American Revolution: From Elite Protest to Popular Revolt,

The American Revolution: From Elite Protest to Popular Revolt, The American Revolution: From Elite Protest to Popular Revolt, 1763 1783 Breakdown of Political Trust Seven Years War left colonists optimistic about future Most important consequence of Seven Years War

More information

UNIT Y212: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

UNIT Y212: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION UNIT Y: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 740-796 NOTE: BASED ON X 50 MINUTE LESSONS PER WEEK TERMS BASED ON 6 TERM YEAR. Key Topic Term Week Number Indicative Content Extended Content Resources The development

More information

LECTURE 3-2: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

LECTURE 3-2: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION LECTURE 3-2: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION British attempts to assert tighter control over its North American colonies and the colonial resolve to pursue self-government led to a colonial independence movement

More information

1. The Stamp Act taxed all legal documents, licenses, dice, playing cards and one other item. What is that other item?

1. The Stamp Act taxed all legal documents, licenses, dice, playing cards and one other item. What is that other item? 1. The Stamp Act taxed all legal documents, licenses, dice, playing cards and one other item. What is that other item? 2. Do you think it was fair for the Parliament to expect the colonies to pay to house

More information

PLACARD 1. Bedford Flag

PLACARD 1. Bedford Flag PLACARD 1 Bedford Flag This flag was present at the battle of Concord in April 19, 1775. It was carried by Nathaniel Page, a Bedford Minuteman. The Latin inscription "Vince Aut Morire" means "Conquer or

More information

I. SSUSH1: The student will describe European settlement in North America during the 17th century

I. SSUSH1: The student will describe European settlement in North America during the 17th century Unit I Review Sheet I. SSUSH1: The student will describe European settlement in North America during the 17th century 1. The Virginia Company A joint stock company. A group of investors share the risk

More information

GOVT 2305: THE ORIGINS OF A NEW NATION:

GOVT 2305: THE ORIGINS OF A NEW NATION: GOVT 2305: THE ORIGINS OF A NEW NATION: 1. MERCATILISM (1700s) Private business and economy should benefit the colonial masters the British Crown The British maintained strict control of import/export

More information

CIVICS EOC JANUARY 2018

CIVICS EOC JANUARY 2018 CIVICS EOC JANUARY 2018 an economic system developing during the decay of feudalism to unify and increase the power and especially the monetary wealth of a nation by a strict governmental regulation of

More information

The Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence N1: This is the story N2: of the birth of the Adapted by Timothy Rasinski The Promise of America A reader s theater for six voices: three narrators (N) and three readers

More information

The American Revolution

The American Revolution The American Revolution Name Date Pd I. The American Revolution A. Reasons for the American Revolution (1763-1775) 1. To pay off, Britain created a series of new on the American colonists a. The colonists

More information

APUSH: Key Concept 3.1. Everything You Need To Know About Key Concept 3.1 To Succeed In APUSH

APUSH: Key Concept 3.1. Everything You Need To Know About Key Concept 3.1 To Succeed In APUSH APUSH: Key Concept 3.1 Everything You Need To Know About Key Concept 3.1 To Succeed In APUSH The New curriculum Key Concept 3.1 British attempts to assert tighter control over its North American colonies

More information

CHAPTER 2: REVOLUTION AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC

CHAPTER 2: REVOLUTION AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC CHAPTER 2: REVOLUTION AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC COLONIAL RESISTANCE AND REBELLION SECTION 1 England s Parliament and Big Ben The Proclamation of 1763 sought to halt the westward expansion of the colonist,

More information

Grade 08 Social Studies Unit 03 Exemplar Lesson 01: Causes of the American Revolution

Grade 08 Social Studies Unit 03 Exemplar Lesson 01: Causes of the American Revolution Unit: 03 Lesson: 01 Suggested Duration: 3 days Grade 08 Unit 03 Exemplar Lesson 01: Causes of the American Revolution This lesson is one approach to teaching the State Standards associated with this unit.

More information

TEKS 8C: Calculate percent composition and empirical and molecular formulas. The American Revolution and the Constitution

TEKS 8C: Calculate percent composition and empirical and molecular formulas. The American Revolution and the Constitution The American Revolution and the Constitution Objectives Describe characteristics of Britain and its 13 American colonies in the mid-1700s. Outline the events that led to the American Revolution. Summarize

More information

The Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence What are the main ideas in the Declaration of Independence? Social Studies Vocabulary Declaration of Independence Founding Fathers militia Minuteman Second Continental Congress

More information

Mention: Sugar Act, Stamp Act, Vice Admiralty Courts, George Grenville

Mention: Sugar Act, Stamp Act, Vice Admiralty Courts, George Grenville Chapter 5 HW Group 1: Why did the colonists object to the new taxes in 1764 and again in 1765? What arguments did they use? How did these conflicts turn into a constitutional crisis? (Page 147) Mention:

More information

Essential Question QuickWrite. Stoking the fire. The Road to Revolution

Essential Question QuickWrite. Stoking the fire. The Road to Revolution Mr. McMurray US History Essential Question QuickWrite 1. Write down everything that you know on the American Revolution 2. Based on what you know, were the colonists justified in their rebellion. The Road

More information

virtual representation

virtual representation 1 Enacted by the British, enforced by customs officers; general search warrant that gave british officials a carte blanche to search civilian property. Meant to enforce Navigation acts, aid British officials

More information

The Birth of a Nation

The Birth of a Nation The Birth of a Nation The student will demonstrate an understanding of the conflicts between regional and national interest in the development of democracy in the United States. Analyze the impact of the

More information

The Declaration of Independence and Its Signers

The Declaration of Independence and Its Signers The Declaration of Independence and Its Signers Objectives Students will be able to explain the events that led up to the colonies severing ties with Great Britain Students will understand the main grievances

More information

Ch. 6 Test Review. The Spirit of Independence

Ch. 6 Test Review. The Spirit of Independence Ch. 6 Test Review The Spirit of Independence John Adams Wentworth Cheswell Samuel Adams Mercy Otis Warren Benjamin Franklin Crispus Attucks Biographical Glossary Rebellion & Revolution (Unit 3) He was

More information

Partner Response. "Join, or Die" is a political cartoon, by Benjamin Franklin, and it was published before the Revolutionary War.

Partner Response. Join, or Die is a political cartoon, by Benjamin Franklin, and it was published before the Revolutionary War. Partner Response "Join, or Die" is a political cartoon, by Benjamin Franklin, and it was published before the Revolutionary War. Franklin created this cartoon to show the colonies that in order to win

More information

This review covers 20 questions you ll see on the Civics Midterm exam.

This review covers 20 questions you ll see on the Civics Midterm exam. This review covers 20 questions you ll see on the Civics Midterm exam. The British Empire in the early 1700 s England The Colonies The areas in red are the parts of the world controlled by the British

More information

Why did the British create it? Why and how should we protest?

Why did the British create it? Why and how should we protest? Introduction As founding members of the Sons and Daughters of Liberty from the great colony of Massachusetts, we are meeting to create correspondence to send out to our fellow colonists. It s time to protest!

More information

U.S. HISTORY I FLASHCARDS and DEFINITIONS

U.S. HISTORY I FLASHCARDS and DEFINITIONS U.S. HISTORY I FLASHCARDS and DEFINITIONS As of November 16, 2015 UNIT 1: The Road towards Revolution District Vocabulary List #1 (Items 1 through 10) 1. ECONOMIC relating to money and resources of a country

More information

FYI - Guiding Question to Be Thinking About: What events & ideas led to American independence?

FYI - Guiding Question to Be Thinking About: What events & ideas led to American independence? 2:2 Coming of Independence PowerPoint Notes Name: FYI - Guiding Question to Be Thinking About: What events & ideas led to American independence? (Slide 2) Objectives: (You should be able to...)! Explain

More information

8th grade I. American Revolution A. A New Nation ( ) *Unit 3 1. The Thirteen Colonies Rebel a. Tighter British Control (1) Main

8th grade I. American Revolution A. A New Nation ( ) *Unit 3 1. The Thirteen Colonies Rebel a. Tighter British Control (1) Main 8th grade 1770-1900 I. American Revolution A. A New Nation (1763-1791) *Unit 3 1. The Thirteen Colonies Rebel a. Tighter British Control Colonists resented new laws and taxes passed by the British after

More information