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1 Directions: Answer the following multiple choice questions. 1. In 1774, the first Continental Congress took place in what city? a. New York City b. Jamestown c. Philadelphia d. Boston I. The deteriorating relationship with Britain II. The Intolerable Acts III. The colonists should continue boycotting British goods IV. A way to claim the territory in the Ohio River Valley a. I and II only b. I, II, and III c. II and III d. IV only 2. Which of the following was NOT one of the issues talked about in the meeting? 3. What was the name of the petition that was signed in the first Continental Congress? a. Declaration and Resolves b. Declaration of Independence c. Declaration to Britain d. Olive Branch Petition a. Benjamin Franklin b. George Washington c. Paul Revere d. Patrick Henry 4. What was the name of the delegate from Virginia that said, Give me liberty or give me death? 5. In the first and second Continental Congress, delegates from every state except showed up. a. Virginia b. Maryland c. Georgia d. Rhode Island 6. In what year did the second Continental Congress take place? a b c d Which of the following is true of the Olive Branch Petition? a. It blamed the colonists for the war with Britain, although it did ask the British to repeal the Intolerable Acts

2 b. It was the colonists last attempt to keep the peace with Britain c. John Adams was disgusted by the petition and refused to sign it d. It asked the states to start drafting a new constitution 8. In response to the Olive Branch Petition, what did King George III do? a. Hire Hessians, German military soldiers, to invade the colonies b. Withdraw all British control from the colonies c. Find ways to get along with the colonists to avoid another costly war d. Ignore the petition completely 9. Why was George Washington named leader of the Continental Army? a. He had a lot of war experience from the French and Indian War b. He was from Virginia and the delegates from the congress said this was an all states matter. c. He wasn t too old and wasn t too young for the job d. All of the above.

3 Directions: Read each section of the Declaration of Independence. Then answer the questions that follow. Part I - Preamble: The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America, When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. 1. According to this paragraph, what is the goal of the writers? 2. Make a prediction of what will come next in the document based on what you have read in the Preamble.

4 Part II - Beliefs We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.--That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness....The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. 3. What are the writers claiming they have? 4. According to this paragraph, what is the purpose of the government?

5 Part V Declaring Independence We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor. 5. What words from this paragraph actually declare the colonists independence? 6. What rights and powers do they state that they now have?

6 Directions: Fill in the blank with the appropriate word or phrase. 1. In order for a law to be passed under the Articles of Confederation, of the votes were needed. 2. In order for a law to be changed under the Articles of Confederation, of the votes were needed. 3. Under the Articles of Confederation, there was no telling the states what to do because the Americans were afraid of another king. Therefore, the states would often fight with each other over boundaries and money. 4. The Articles of Confederation did set up a though. This branch often writes/passes laws. 5. In 1787, after ten years, the Articles of Confederation were ratified, or changed. This was thanks to multiple rebellions across the country, but primarily thanks to, a farmer, who couldn't pay his debts.

7 Directions: Long Answers. Please answer the following questions in complete sentences. 1. What is Checks and Balances and how does it prevent any one branch from gaining too much power? 2. What is a federal government? 3. Why did people like Thomas Jefferson and Patrick Henry dislike federalists? 4. In 1789, the Bill of Rights were written to limit the power of the federal government even more. What are the Bill of Rights?

8 Secretary of State: Secretary of Treasury: Secretary of War: Attorney General: Chief Justice of Supreme Court: Extra Credit Washington s Cabinet

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