THE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG LIBRARIES. Hong Kong Collection. gift from Hong Kong (China). Central Policy Unit

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2 THE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG LIBRARIES Hong Kong Collection gift from Hong Kong (China). Central Policy Unit

3 MDR Quality, Dedication & Expertise Preparedfor Central Policy Unit Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Land Boundary Control Points - Final Report - M.4448/June2002/EC

4 Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Contents Introduction and Survey Methodology Summary of Key Findings Page Report of Survey Findings Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Annex General Trip Pattern Views on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Land Boundary Control Points Impact on Pattern of Trips to the Mainland if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at Impact on Housing Demand in Hong Kong if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at Impact on Employment in Hong Kong if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at Impact on Family Relationship if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at Land Boundary Control Points Impact on Law and Order in Hong Kong if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at Questionnaire All research projects are conducted in accordance with the provisions of the ICC/ESOMAR International Code of Marketing and Social Research Practice

5 Introduction and Survey Methodology

6 Chapter 1 Introduction and Survey Methodology Background 1.1 Round-the-clock operation of the land boundary control points for passengers is a long-term objective of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government and the Mainland authorities. In view of the increasing volume of passenger traffic on both sides of the boundary, the extension of the operating hours of the boundary control points is a natural development to meet practical needs. 1.2 Opening the control points round-the-clock, however, involves complicated issues such as the likely number of passengers, the resource implications and economic benefits that need to be examined. There are also different public views on the socio-economic impacts of such arrangement. Survey Objective 1.3 The objective of this household survey is to collect data on the possible behavioural changes of the public if 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points is introduced. Survey Coverage 1.4 The survey covered all land-based households in Hong Kong, excluding the following sparsely-populated areas (a) (b) (c) all islands except Lantau Island. In the case of Lantau Island, only Mui Wo, Discovery Bay and Tung Chung were included in the survey; frontier closed areas; and country parks..,5 The target respondents were persons aged 15 and over. Data Collection Method 1.6 Survey data were collected by face-to-face interviews during household visits. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 1

7 Sample Design Sampling frame 1.7 The Frame of Quarters maintained by the Census and Statistics Department was used for sample selection. Sample size and sample allocation 1.8 A random sample of households was successfully interviewed in the survey. 1.9 Since residents living in districts near the boundary (i.e. North and Yuen Long) are more likely to be affected by the 24-hour operation of the land boundary control points, it is important to have sufficient number of these households for analyses. Therefore, a disproportionately larger sample was allocated to households living in North and Yuen Long The data collected were weighted in accordance with the number of persons in Hong Kong by sex and age in North, Yuen Long and other districts to derive unbiased overall results. Selection of households and respondents 1.11 For quarters with two or more households living there, all of them were interviewed to maintain an equal selection probability of households In each sampled household, all persons of age 15 and over were interviewed individually. Questionnaire 1.13 A structured questionnaire was used in the survey, which covered several major aspects to find out from the target respondents (a) their general pattern of trips to the Mainland of China; (b) their views on 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points; and (c) its impact on pattern of trips to the Mainland, housing demand, employment, family relationship, and law and order in Hong Kong. The average length of an interview was 35 minutes. A copy of the questionnaire is at Annex, 1.14 To test the applicability of the questionnaire and the fieldwork procedures, a pilot survey covering 30 households was conducted on 19 and 20 January Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 2

8 Quality Control 1.15 Suitable measures were taken to ensure the survey results were of high quality. These included proper training of interviewers, monitoring of the interviewing process by fieldwork supervisors, independent checking of the completed questionnaires, and validation of the collected data. Fieldwork Period and Enumeration Results 1.16 Fieldwork was conducted between 28 January and 17 March In the quarters initially sampled for the survey, 606 were invalid cases (e.g. quarters that were unoccupied, demolished or for non-residential use). In the remaining quarters, it was estimated that there were households. Among them, households were successfully enumerated, with living in North or Yuen Long. The overall response rate was 77%. In the households that were successfully enumerated, there were a total of persons of age 15 or over. Details of the enumeration results are shown in the table below. (1) Number of addresses sampled for the survey (2) Number of invalid addresses e.g. quarters that were unoccupied, demolished or for non-residential use (3) Number of valid addresses (4) Number of households in the valid addresses (a) Number of households fully enumerated - Households living in North or Yuen Long - Households living in other districts (b) Number of unsuccessful cases e.g. partially enumerated cases, non-contacts, refusals, etc. (5) Response rate: (4)(a)/(4) Overall % Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 3

9 Report of Survey Findings 1.17 A summary of the key survey findings is presented in Chapter 2 and the detailed findings in Chapter 3 to Chapter For tables presented in this report, figures may not add up to totals because of rounding. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 4

10 Summary of Key Findings

11 Chapter 2 Summary of Key Findings 2.1 The following presents a summary of the key survey findings. Details are given in Chapter 3 to Chapter 9. A. General trip pattern 2.2 Among Hong Kong residents aged 15 and over- (a) (b) (63.9%) had visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points in the past 12 months, with 61.8% having crossed the boundary through land boundary control points and 10.8% through water boundary control points (3.8%) visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week, (6.9%) less than once a week but at least once a month, and (10.3%) less than once a month but at least once every three months. 2.3 For those persons (representing 21.0% of all persons aged 15 and over) who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once every three months, their usual trip pattern is given below Purposes of trips to the Mainland (a) Their main purposes of visiting the Mainland were "for work" (27.5%), "to visit relatives other than spouse and children" (19.0%), "for shopping" (13.5%), "for sightseeing" (12.9%), "for leisure" (7.8%), "for going home" I 1 ) (7.2%), "to visit residential properties in the Mainland" (7.1%), and u to visit friends" (3.4%). (1) Persons who went home in the Mainland where they lived alone or with their spouse or children. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 5

12 Mostly visited location in the Mainland (b) Most (97.0%) usually visited Guangdong province while 2.5% other provinces. Within Guangdong province, Shenzhen area (50.4%) was the most common destination, followed by Dongguan area (13.0%), Guangzhou area (7.8%), Huizhou area (3.7%) and Zhongshan area (3.7%). Usual duration of trips to the Mainland (c) 31.0% usually did not stay overnight in the Mainland while half (49.8%) stayed two to three days per trip and 10.8% four to seven days. Only 5.1% stayed in the Mainland for more than a week per trip. The remaining 3.4% said that their duration of stay in the Mainland was not fixed. Control point mostly used (d) The majority (85.9%) crossed the boundary through Lo Wu Control Point on most occasions and 7.0% through Lok Ma Chau Control Point. Less than 3% crossed the boundary through the other control points. Usual day and time crossing the boundary to the Mainland (e) (f) 63.0% usually crossed the boundary to the Mainland during weekdays and 43.5% during weekends. 10.8% usually visited the Mainland on public holidays. 18.5% said that their day of travel was not fixed. 31.1% usually crossed the boundary to the Mainland between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m., 61.0% between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. A small proportion (3.0%) crossed the boundary after 9 p.m., with a higher proportion recorded for the following persons those aged 20 to 29 (7.6%); single persons (5.6%); persons having spouse or children in the Mainland (5.3%); goods vehicle drivers (6.0%); service workers / shop sales workers (7.1%); plant and machine operators / assemblers (excluding drivers) (5.9%); craft and related workers (4.6%); persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for going home" (6.7%), "for leisure" (5.8%) and a for sightseeing" (4.5%); and persons living in North or Yuen Long (4.2%). Of those persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work" a 1.3% usually crossed the boundary after 9 p.m. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 6

13 B. Views on 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points Views on existing arrangement of passenger clearance at land boundary control points 2.4 In the survey, all persons aged 15 and over were asked whether or not they considered the existing arrangement of passenger clearance at land boundary control points convenient. (a) The majority (82.5%) answered in the positive while 8.2% said the opposite. A small proportion (0.6%) considered that the existing arrangement was convenient at some but not all land boundary control points. Another 8.7% did not express any views. (b) The major reasons for considering the existing arrangement inconvenient were "too crowded when crossing the boundary during peak hours on weekends and public holidays" (78.4%) and "too crowded when crossing the boundary during peak hours on weekdays" (38.5%). "Absence of 24-hour passenger clearance" was mentioned by only 2.7% of the respondents. 2.5 For those persons who considered the existing arrangement of passenger clearance inconvenient at all or some land boundary control points (representing 8,8% of all persons aged 15 and over), they were asked to indicate which arrangement they considered as most convenient to them. The findings show that "to reduce congestion during peak hours on weekends and public holidays" was the arrangement preferred by most (44,9%), followed by "to reduce congestion during peak hours on weekdays" (18.5%), and "to open control points round-the-clock on days before and after long holidays" (12.9%). "To open control points round the clock every day" was mentioned by 11.4% of the respondents. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 7

14 Views on 24-hour operation of land boundary control points 2.6 In the survey, all persons aged 15 and over were asked whether or not they considered 24-hour operation of land boundary control points useful to them. (a) (b) The majority (86.7%) answered in the negative. 12,5% answered in the positive. The dominant reason was that "it allows them to cross the boundary at any time when there is a need" (74.0%). Other reasons were that "they would often cross the boundary during the extended hours for returning home in Hong Kong" (30.1%), "for going to work in the Mainland" (3.2%), "for shopping / leisure / meals in the Mainland" (2.8%), "for going to work in Hong Kong" (2.8%) and "for visiting relatives other than spouse and children in the Mainland" (2.5%). 2.7 For those persons who considered 24-hour operation of land boundary control points useful (representing 12.5% of all persons aged 15 and over), they were further asked to express their views in regard to the following aspects - Preferred time for implementing 24-hour operation of land boundary control points (a) (b) (c) 49.9% suggested that 24-hour operation of land boundary control points should be implemented as soon as possible and 16.9% within the next 12 months. This was mainly because "it allows them to cross the boundary at any time when there is a need" (86.0%). However, 12.5% considered that 24-hour operation of land boundary control points should be implemented one year later and 2.1% even said that the later it was implemented the better it would be. The major reasons cited were "no urgent need for crossing the boundary during the extended hours" (48.2%), "the Government needs time to make arrangements " (30.4%), and "did not want to put Hong Kong's economy under pressure so soon" (22.9%). The remaining 18.7% did not have any preference for the time of implementing 24-hour operation of land boundary control points. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 8

15 Number of land boundary control points for 24-hour operation (d) Two-thirds (67.8%) considered it suffice to open one land boundary control point for 24-hour operation while 28.1% thought the opposite. 4.1% said that it would depend on which control point would operate round-the-clock. Land boundary control point desired by most for 24-hour operation (e) Lo Wu Control Point (84.0%) was desired by most for 24-hour operation, followed far behind by Lok Ma Chau Control Point (7.7%), Hung Horn Control Point (6.1%), Man Kam To Control Point (1.6%) and Sha Tau Kok Control Point (0.5%). 2.8 All persons aged 15 and over were further asked whether they would cross the boundary during the extended hours if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. 2.9% answered in the affirmative while the majority (86.8%) said not. 10.3% were uncertain. Further analyses of the 2.9% reveal that a higher proportion of the following persons would cross the boundary during the extended hours - Persons aged 30 to 39 (4.3%) and persons aged 40 to 49 (3.9%) (as against 1.2% to 3.0% for persons aged 15 to 29 and 0.8% to 2.9% for persons aged 50 and over) Persons having spouse or children in the Mainland (8.4%) (as against 2.7% for persons not having spouse nor children in the Mainland) Goods vehicle drivers (11.0%), managers / administrators (7.0%), and service workers / shop sales workers (4.9%) (as against 2.3% to 4.0% for other occupation groups) Persons who need to work in the Mainland frequently (12.3%) (as against 3.1% for person who did not need to work in the Mainland frequently) Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 9

16 Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week (20.9%), persons who visited the Mainland less than once a week but at least once every two weeks (10.8%), persons who visited the Mainland less than once every two weeks but at least once a month (9.1%) and persons who visited the Mainland less than once a month but at least once every three months (6.0%) (as against 1.5% for persons who visited the Mainland less than once every three months and 0.6% for persons who had not visited the Mainland in the past 12 months) Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points mainly "for leisure" (18.0%), "forgoing home" (15.3%), "for work" (11.6%), "for visiting friends" (10.8%), and "for shopping" (9.7%). Persons living in Yuen Long (4.8%) (as against 2.6% for persons living in North and 2.8% for persons living in other districts in Hong Kong) 2.9 For those persons who would cross the boundary during the extended hours if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points (2,9% of all persons aged 15 and over), they were asked how often and for what purpose they would cross the boundary during the extended hours. The results are given below - Expected frequency of crossing the boundary during the extended hours (a) 28.1% would cross the boundary during the extended hours frequently and 59.4% occassionally while 12.6% would seldom do so. Perceived main purpose for crossing the boundary during the extended hours (b) "For going home in Hong Kong" (56.5%) was the most common purpose for crossing the boundary during the extended hours, followed by "for urgent matters" (24.6%), "for shopping / leisure / meals in the Mainland" (5.6%), "for going home in the Mainland" (3.7%) and "for work in Hong Kone" (3.6%). Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 10

17 C. Impact on pattern of trips to the Mainland if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points Number of visits to the Mainland and duration of stay per trip 2.10 Of those persons aged 15 and over who had visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points in the past 12 months (representing 63.9% of all persons aged 15 and over) - (a) (b) 7.0% said that they would make more visits to the Mainland if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points while 0.1% would make fewer visits. Most (92.9%), however, would make similar number of visits to the Mainland. Most (90.4%), would maintain their duration of stay per trip to the Mainland. 8.5% said that they would stay longer per trip to the Mainland if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points while 1.2% would shorten their trips. The dominant reason for lengthening their trips to the Mainland was "staying longer for entertainment in the Mainland" (83.2%), followed by "staying longer for work in the Mainland" (12.1%) and "staying overnight in the Mainland more often" (8.7%). The only two reasons for shortening their trips to the Mainland were "staying overnight in the Mainland less often" (83.5%) and "returning to Hong Kong more often" (22.5%). Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 11

18 Activities in the Mainland 2.11 For the persons who would change their number of visits to the Mainland or their duration of stay per trip to the Mainland (7.5% of all persons aged 15 and over), they were asked which types of activities they would be engaged in more often or less often in the Mainland. The results are given below - (a) (b) The most common activities they would be engaged in more often in the Mainland were "having meals / drinks" (27.1%), "participating in leisure activities" (25.8%) and "going shopping" (24.1%). Other activities were "visiting relatives other than spouse and children" (15.8%), "going to work" (13.7%), "staying overnight in the Mainland" (12.7%) and "visiting friends" (10.5%). About one-tenth (9.6%), however, said that there would not be any activity they would be engaged in more in the Mainland. In regard to the activities they would be engaged in less often in the Mainland, the dominant one was "staying overnight in the Mainland" (18.8%). The majority (80.2%), however, said that there would not be any activity they would be engaged in less often in the Mainland. Monthly expenditure in the Mainland 2.12 Of those persons who visited the Mainland at least once a month and would change their number of visits or their duration of stay per trip to the Mainland (2.5% of all persons aged 15 and over), 63.0% said that they would spend more in the Mainland per month if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points while 4.7% would spend less. The remaining 32.3% said that the amount of their monthly expenditure in the Mainland would be more or less the same. D. Impact on housing demand in Hong Kong if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at the land boundary control points Impact on housing demand in Hong Kong 2.13 Of all persons aged 18 and over, it was estimated that 35.9% currently owned residential properties in Hong Kong and 5.3% had plans to purchase residential properties in Hong Kong in the next three years. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 12

19 (a) (b) Of those persons who currently owned residential properties in Hong Kong (representing 35.9% of all persons aged 18 and over), nearly all (98.0%) would keep their residential properties in Hong Kong even if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points, 2.0% said that they would sell their properties in Hong Kong. As for those persons who had plans to purchase residential properties in Hong Kong in the next three years (representing 5.3% of all persons aged 18 and over), the majority (89.5%) said that the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would not affect their plans. However, 7.0% said that they would delay their plans and 2.3% would even cancel their plans while 1.1% would speed up their plans. The dominant reason for delaying or cancelling their plans of purchasing residential properties in Hong Kong was u they worry that property prices in Hong Kong would drop" (85.7%). Other reasons were "they would take up residence in the Mainland" (9.1%) and "they would purchase a residential property in the Mainland" (8.8%) if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. Impact on housing demand in the Mainland 2.14 Of all persons aged 18 and over, it was estimated that 10.4% currently owned or rented residential properties in the Mainland; and 2.8% had plans to purchase, build or rent residential properties in the Mainland in the next three years. (a) Of those persons who had plans to purchase, build or rent residential properties in the Mainland (representing 2.8% of all persons aged 18 and over), the majority (73.1%) said that the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would not affect their plans. However, 24.7% said that they would speed up their plans while 1.3% would delay their plans and 0.9% would cancel their plans. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 13

20 The major reasons for speeding up their plans to purchase, build or rent residential properties in the Mainland were "they would visit the Mainland more often" (52.4%), "they would take up residence in the Mainland" (30.8%) and "they expect that property prices in the Mainland would rise" (22.8%). (b) Of those persons who did not have plans to purchase, build or rent residential properties in the Mainland in the next three years (representing 97.2% of all persons aged 18 and over), nearly all (97.9%) said that they would not consider doing so even if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. However, 0.4% would and 1.7% might consider doing so because "they would visit the Mainland more often" (55.8%), "they would take up residence in the Mainland" (32.9%) and "they expect that the property prices in the Mainland would rise" (12.9%). Impact on aspiration to take up residence in the Mainland 2.15 In the survey, all household heads were asked whether their entire households intended to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years. It was estimated that some households (0.9%) had such an intention while most (99.0%) did not. (2) (a) (b) Of those households that had an intention to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years (representing 0.9% of all households), the majority (79.1%) said that the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would not affect their plans. However, the remaining 20.9% would speed up their plans. Of those households that did not intend to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years (representing 99.0% of all households), 0.1% said that they would probably take up residence in the Mainland if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points while most (99.4%) would not. The remaining 0.6% were uncertain. (2) A very small proportion (0.04%) said that they were already residing in the Mainland. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 14

21 (c) Of those households that intended to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years and those that would consider taking up residence in the Mainland if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points (representing 1.6% of all households), 46.4% would return their present accommodation in Hong Kong to the owners when they took up residence in the Mainland. 24.8% would keep it for self-occupation while about one-tenth would lease it out (11.5%) or sell it (10,8%) For cases where the household heads said that their entire households did not intend to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years, their household members aged 18 and over were asked individually about their intention to take up residence in the Mainland. Including the members of cases where the entire household intended to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years, the survey results indicate that 1.4% of all persons aged 18 and over (or some persons) had an intention to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years while most (98.1%) did not have such an intention. (3) (a) (b) Of those persons who intended to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years, 19.8% said that they would speed up their plans if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points because "it allows them to return to Hong Kong at any time when there is a need" (94.3%) and "they can return to the Mainland even when they work late in Hong Kong" (11.3%). However, the majority (79.3%) said that the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would not affect their plans and 0.8% would delay their plans. Of those persons who did not have an intention to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years, most (98.9%) said that they would not consider taking up residence in the Mainland even if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. However, 0.2% would or might consider doing so because "it allows them to return to Hong Kong at any time when there is a need" (88.3%). (3) A small proportion (0.5%) said that they were already residing in the Mainland. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 15

22 E. Impact on employment in Hong Kong if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points 2.17 The survey results indicate that one-tenth (9.7%) of employed persons aged 15 and over (representing 56.5% of all persons aged 15 and over) had to work in the Mainland frequently. Of the remaining 90.3% of employed persons, 39.8% said that they would accept taking up enployment that required them to work in the Mainland frequently while 49.0% would not Of those unemployed persons aged 15 and over, 49.3% would accept taking up employment or business opportunity that required them to work in the Mainland frequently while 41.1% would not Taking together employed and unemployed persons who would not accept taking up employment and / or business opportunity that required them to work in the Mainland frequently (representing persons or 33.3% of all persons aged 15 and over), 5.8% said that they would accept if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. The dominant reason was "it allows them to return to Hong Kong at any time when there is a need" (95.9%) All economically active persons were asked whether or not they would consider taking up work of a different job nature or business nature if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. A very small proportion (0.3%) answered in the affirmative while most (97.9%) said not. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 16

23 F. Impact on family relationship in Hong Kong if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points 2.21 In the survey, all persons aged 15 and over who were living with their spouse, children and / or parents in Hong Kong were asked whether or not the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would affect their gathering time and relationship. The results are presented below - (a) (b) Most said that the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would not affect their gathering time with their spouse (97.1%), children (97.5%) and parents (97.5%). A very small proportion said that their gathering time would increase (0.5%, 0.4% and 0.2% respectively) or decrease (2.3%, 2.1% and 2.3% respectively). Similarly, nearly all said that their relationship with their spouse (98.2%), children (98.9%) and parents (99.4%) would remain unchanged. A very small proportion said that their relationship would improve (0.4%, 0.3% and 0.1%) or deteriorate (1.4%, 0.8% and 0.5%). Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 17

24 G. Impact on law and order in Hong Kong if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points 2.22 All persons aged 15 and over were asked whether they considered the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would affect the law and order in their district of residence when keeping all other factors constant. (a) (b) Most (92.4%) considered that there would not be any impact on law and order. However, 7.3% considered that law and order in their district of residence would become worse, especially for persons living in North (19.5%) and Yuen Long (12.0%). The major reasons were "more people would pass through their districts" (67.0%), "criminals would flee to the Mainland conveniently" (22.5%), and "there would be more illegal immigrants from the Mainland" (6.2%). Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 18

25 H. Views of frequent travellers on 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points 2.23 It is estimated that persons aged 15 and over were frequent travellers who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week. A comparison was made between these frequent travellers and all persons aged 15 and over, and the results indicate the following variations in their pattern of trips to the Mainland as well as their views on 24-hour operation of land boundary control points - Persons ared 15 and over Frequent travellers J Infrequent travellers^ General trip pattern (amongpersons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once every three months) Persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work" Persons who usually stayed in the Mainland for two to seven days ,5 Persons who usually visited the Mainland during weekdays Views on 24-hour operation of land boundary control points (among all persons aged 15 and over) Persons who considered the existing arrangement of passenger clearance at land boundary control points inconvenient Type of arrangement being considered as most convenient (amongpersons who considered the existing arrangement inconvenient) To reduce congestion during peak hours on weekdays To reduce congestion during peak hours on weekends and public holidays To open control points round-the-clock every day Persons who considered 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points useful Persons who said that they would cross the boundary during the extended hours Note: 1. Frequent travellers referred to persons aged 15 and over who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week 2. Infrequent travellers referred to persons aged 15 and over who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points less than once a week Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 19

26 2.24 Further analyses reveal that the implementation of 24-hour operation of land boundary control points would have a greater impact on the trip pattern to the Mainland of frequent travellers - Persons aged 15 and over % Impact on trip pattern to the Mainland (amongpersons who had visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points in the past 12 months) Persons who would make more visits to the Mainland 7.0 Persons who would lengthen their duration of stay per trip to the Mainland 8.5 Persons who would shorten their duration of stay per trip to the Mainland 1.2 Persons who would spend more or less the same in the Mainland per month (among persons who visited the Mainland at least once a month and would change the number of visits or duration of stay per trip to the Mainland if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points) 32.3 Frequent Infrequent travellers l travellers 2 % % Note: 1. Frequent travellers referred to persons aged 15 and over who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least onee a week 2. Inirequent travellers referred to persons aged 15 and over ywho visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points less than orice a week Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 20

27 I. Conclusion 2.25 Cross-boundary travel between Hong Kong and the Mainland has become an increasingly common experience for many Hong Kong people. Statistics showed that, in the past 12 months, two-thirds (63.9%) of the general public (referred to those aged 15 and over) had visited the mainland through land or water boundary control points. 3.8% had made trips to the Mainland as frequently as once or more per week. In general, cross-boundary travellers were quite satisfied with the existing arrangement of passenger clearance at land boundary control points, with 82.5% of the general public considering the arrangement convenient. Of the 8.2% who found the arrangement inconvenient, the major cause of their complaint was congestion at peak hours during weekends and public holidays, and most of them preferred the arrangement of reducing congestion during peak hours on weekends and public holidays In fact, the survey findings revealed that, the public in general who travelled between Hong Kong and the Mainland, took the view that 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would not be particularly useful to them given that few of them (2.9%) would cross the boundary during the extended hours. Only a small proportion (12.5%) considered 24-hour passenger clearance useful, particularly in a sense that it would allow the flexibility of crossing the boundary at any time when need arose (74.0%) The scenario was, however, a bit different for those whose visits to the Mainland were mainly necessitated by work. Of them, nearly half (43.7%) crossed the boundary at least once a week and a considerably larger proportion (34.0%) considered 24-hour passenger clearance useful. 11.6% said that they would cross the boundary during the extended hours for purposes such as returning home in Hong Kong (58.6%), dealing with urgent matters (30.4%), going to work in the Mainland (7.0%) or Hong Kong (3.3%). Nevertheless, two -thirds of them considered that it would suffice to open one land boundary control point for 24-hour operation. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 21

28 2.28 Overall speaking, apart from the anticipation that people would take up more readily jobs that required frequent travels to the Mainland and that a small proportion would spend more during their visit to the Mainland, the perceived 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points did not seem to have a significant impact over the socio-economic activities of the public at large. Over 90% of the general public claimed that they would neither travel more frequently to nor stay longer in the Mainland. Similarly, it was most unlikely that property owners would sell their properties in Hong Kong. Most said that the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance would not affect their plans to purchase residential properties in Hong Kong though a very small proportion considered that such arrangement would prompt them to take up residence in the Mainland. As far as family relationship was concerned, the majority said that their relationship and the time spent with family members would remain unchanged. The chance that 24-hour passenger clearance would give rise to youth problems was also slim given that only 3.1% of those who would cross the border during the extended service hours were youngsters. On law and order, the public at large believed that social order would remain unaffected in their respective districts of residence even if the land boundary points were operated round-the-clock It was worth noting that, of those living in districts adjacent to the border, such as the North and Yuen Long, a relatively larger proportion tended to worry that law and order in their district would deteriorate given the expected increase in passenger flow through their neighbourhood. However, their perceived impact of 24-hour passenger clearance on their travelling pattern, housing demand, employment and family relations did not seem to differ distinctly from that of the general public. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 22

29 Report of Survey Findings

30 General Trip Pattern

31 Chapter 3 General Trip Pattern Whether had visited the Mainland of China through land or water boundary control points in the past 12 months 3.1 In the survey, all Hong Kong residents aged 15 and over were asked whether they had visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points in the past 12 months. (a) It was estimated that some persons aged 15 and over (63.9%) had visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points in the past 12 months, with 61.8% having crossed the boundary through land boundary control points and 10.8% through water boundary control points. (b) Subgroup analyses indicate that a higher proportion of the following persons had visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points in the past 12 months Persons aged 40 to 49 (72.5%) and 50 to 59 (71.6%) (as against 49.0% to 66.2% for other age groups) Married persons (69.9%) (as against 54.1% for single persons and 55.1% for persons who were separated, divorced or widowed) Persons having spouse or children in the Mainland (87,1 %) (as against 62.8% for persons not having spouse or children in the Mainland) Managers / administrators (80.0%), craft and related workers (73.5%), goods vehicle drivers (72.8%) and other drivers (72.0%) (as against 47.7% to 67.3% for other occupation groups) Persons usually living in the Mainland of China (100.0%) and persons living in North (70.9%) (as against 63.3% for persons living in other districts in Hong Kong) Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 23

32 Frequency of visiting the Mainland through land or water boundary control points 3.2 Of all persons aged 15 and over, (3.8%) visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week, (6.9%) less than once a week but at least once a month, and (10.3%) less than once a month but at least once every three months. (a) The demographic characteristics of the persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week are presented below % were males and 17.4% females. 0.4% were of age 15 to 19, 11.1% 20 to 29, 32.7% 30 to 39, 35.9% 40 to 49, 14.9% 50 to 59 and 5.0% 60 and over. 19.1% were single, 78.4% married and 2.6% separated / divorced / widowed. 16.7% had spouse or children in the Mainland. 94.2% were economically active persons. - Among them, 35.7% were managers / administrators, 13.4% professionals / associate professionals, 13.8% craft and related workers, 10.0% service workers / shop sales workers, 10.0% goods vehicle drivers, 6.3% persons engaged in elementary occupations, 5.0% clerks, 3.1% other vehicle drivers, and 0.6% plant and machine operators / assemblers (excluding drivers). 5.8% were economically inactive persons, with 3.4% being homemakers, 1.8% retired persons, 0.1% students and 0.5% other economically active persons. 8.1% usually lived in Yuen Long, 7.0% North and 80.3% other districts in Hong Kong. The remaining 4.6% usually lived in the Mainland of China. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 24

33 (b) Further analyses show that a higher proportion of the following persons visited the Mainland at least once a week - Persons having spouse or children in the Mainland (14.5%) (as against 3.3% for persons not having spouse or children in the Mainland) Managers / administrators (17.9%) and goods vehicle drivers (25.9%) (as against 1.8% to 6.6% for other occupation groups) Persons who visited the Mainland through land and water boundary control points mainly "for work" (43.7%), "for going home" (26.5%), "for visiting friends" (13.4%), "for leisure" (12.0%) and "for making visits to residential properties in the Mainland" (11.4%) (as against 2.4% to 5.5% for persons travelling to the Mainland for other main purposes) Persons usually living in the Mainland of China (38.7%), North (6.2%) and Yuen Long (4.8%) (as against 3.4% for persons usually living in other districts of Hong Kong) Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 25

34 Usual trip pattern 3.3 For those persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once every three months, their usual trip pattern is given below - Purposes of trips to the Mainland (a) (b) Their usual purposes of visiting the Mainland were "for work" (29.6%), "to visit relatives other than spouse and children" (25.1%), "for shopping" (24.5%), "for sightseeing" (23.0%), "for leisure" (17.5%), "to visit residential properties in the Mainland" (9.1%), "for going home" (4) (8.1%) and "to visit friends" (6.4%). When they were asked which of the usual purposes they mentioned was the main purpose of their trips to the Mainland, "for work" (27.5%) was mentioned by most, followed by "to visit relatives other than spouse and children" (19.0%), "for shopping" (13.5%), "for sightseeing" (12.9%), "for leisure" (7.8%), "for going home" (7.2%), "to visit residential properties in the Mainland" (7.1%), and "to visit friends" (3.4%). Analyzed by sex, "for work" (35.7% vs 15.3%) and "for going home" (9.4% vs 3.8%) were more commonly cited by males than females. On the other hand, "for visiting relatives / friends other than spouse and children" (23.6% vs 15.9%), "for shopping" (19.9% vs 9.3%) and "for sightseeing" (15.7% vs 11.1 %) were more commonly cited by females than males. For persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week, the main purpose they mostly cited was "for work" (663%). (4) Persons who went home in the Mainland where they lived alone or with their spouse or children. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 2 6

35 Mostly visited location in the Mainland (c) Most (97.0%) usually visited Guangdong province while 2.5% other provinces. Within Guangdong province, Shenzhen area (50.4%) was the most common destination, followed by Dongguan area (13.0%), Guangzhou area (7.8%), Huizhou area (3.7%) and Zhongshan area (3.7%). Another 11.1% said that they usually visited Guangdong province but the location was not fixed. Usual duration of trips to the Mainland (d) 31.0% usually did not stay overnight in the Mainland while half (49.8%) stayed two to three days per trip and 10.8% four to seven days. Only 5.1% stayed in the Mainland for more than a week per trip. The remaining 3.4% said that their duration of stay in the Mainland was not fixed. Of those persons who visited the Mainland at least once a week, a smaller proportion (27.5%) did not stay overnight in the Mainland while a larger proportion (55.8%) usually stayed in the Mainland for two to three days per trip and 13.9% four to seven days. However, none stayed more than a week. The proportion who usually did not stay overnight in the Mainland was higher among those who visited the Mainland mainly "for shopping" (67.3%), "for leisure" (57.3%), and for work (35.4%). However, most of those who visited the Mainland mainly "for going home" (91.0%) and "for making visits to residential properties in the Mainland" (96.2%) usually stayed overnight in the Mainland. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 2 7

36 Control point mostly used (e) The majority (85.9%) crossed the boundary through Lo Wu Control Point on most occasions and 7.0% through Lok Ma Chau Control Point. Less than 3% crossed the boundary through the other control points. Similar results were obtained from persons living in North. However, a higher proportion of persons living in Yuen Long mostly crossed the boundary through Lok Ma Chau Control Point (16.7%). Usual day and time crossing the boundary to the Mainland (f) 63.0% usually crossed the boundary to the Mainland during weekdays, with 42.6% from Monday to Thursday and 20.4% on Friday. 43.5% usually crossed the boundary during weekends, with 27.8% on Saturday and 15.7% on Sunday. 10.8% usually visited the Mainland on public holidays. The remaining 18.5% said that their day of travel was not fixed. The proportion who usually visited the Mainland during weekdays was much higher among persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work" (97.8%) and frequent travellers who visited the Mainland through land and water boundary control points at least once a week (91.5%). The proportion who usually visited the Mainland during weekends was higher among those who visited the Mainland mainly "for shopping" (65.9%), "for sightseeing" (59.2%), "for visiting friends" (58.5%), "for leisure" (57.5%) and "for home" (48.1%). A higher proportion of those who visited the Mainland mainly "for visiting relatives other than spouse and children" (22.4%) made their trips on public holidays. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 28

37 (g) 31.1 % usually crossed the boundary to the Mainland between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m., 61.0% between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. A small proportion (3.0%) crossed the boundary after 9 p.m. The remaining 11.7% said that their time of travel was not fixed. Further analyses reveal that a higher proportion of the following persons crossed the boundary to the Mainland after 9 p.m. - Persons aged 20 to 29 (7.6%) (as against 0.8% to 3.4% for persons aged 30 and over and 4.5% for persons aged 15 to 19) Single persons (5.6%) (as against 2.3% for married / cohabited persons) Persons having spouse or children (5.3%) in the Mainland (as against 2.8% for persons not having spouse nor children in the Mainland) Goods vehicle drivers (6.0%), other vehicle drivers (9.4%), service workers / shop sales workers (7.1%), Plant and machine operators / assemblers (excluding drivers) (5.9%), craft and related workers (4.6%) (as against 1.6% to 3,3% for other occupation groups) Persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for going home" (6.7%), "for leisure" (5.8%) and "for sightseeing" (4.5%) (as against 1.3% for persons visiting the Mainland mainly "for work" and 2.3% to 3.2% for persons travelling to the Mainland for other main purposes) Persons living in North or Yuen Long (4.2%) (as against 2,7% for persons living in other districts in Hong Kong) Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 29

38 Usual day and time crossing the boundary to Hong Kong (h) 65.9% usually crossed the boundary to Hong Kong during weekdays, with 46.3% from Monday to Thursday and 19.6% on Friday. 46.7% usually crossed the boundary during weekends, with 18.5% on Saturday and 28.2% on Sunday. 8.5% usually returned to Hong Kong on public holidays. The remaining 20.2% said that their day of travel was not fixed. The proportion who usually returned to Hong Kong during weekdays was much higher among persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work" (94.6%) and frequent travellers who visited the Mainland through land and water boundary control points at least once a week (88,2%). The proportion who usually returned to Hong Kong during weekends was higher among those who visited the Mainland mainly "for shopping" (64.1%), "for visiting friends" (59,9%), "for leisure" (59.5%), "for sightseeing" (56.6%) and "for making visits to residential properties in the Mainland" (52.1%). A higher proportion of those who visited the Mainland mainly "for visiting relatives other than spouse and children" (16.3%) made their return trips to Hong Kong on public holidays. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 30

39 (i) 4.9% usually crossed the boundary to Hong Kong between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m., 60,4% between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. A considerable proportion (30.8%) returned to Hong Kong after 9 p.m., with 3.3% between 11 p.m. and midnight. The remaining 11.6% said that their time of travel was not fixed. Further analyses reveal that a higher proportion of the following persons crossed the boundary to Hong Kong after 9 p.m. - Persons aged under 50 (32.2% for persons aged 15 to 19, 38.7% for persons aged 20 to 29, 34.6% for persons aged 30 to 39 and 32.6% for persons aged 40 to 49) (as against 25.6% for persons aged 50 to 59 and 16.6% for persons aged 60 and over) Single persons (34.4%) (as against 29.5% for married / cohabited persons) Non-goods vehicle drivers (41.3%), clerks (38.1%), service workers / shop sales workers (37.2%) (as against 22.2% to 32.9% for other occupation groups) Persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for leisure" (47.8%), "for shopping" (40.5%) and "for sightseeing" (37.9%) (as against 24.2% for persons visiting the Mainland mainly "for work" and 22.2% to 28.0% for persons travelling to the Mainland for other main purposes) On the other hand, a higher proportion of the following persons returned to Hong Kong between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m. - Persons aged 20 to 29 (6.5%) (as against 2.6% for persons aged 15 to 19 and 4.3% to 5.3% for persons aged 30 and over) Persons having spouse or children in the Mainland (14.5%) (as against 3.8% for persons not having spouse nor children in the Mainland) Goods vehicle drivers (13.0%), persons engaged in elementary occupations (9.6%), craft and related workers (8,8%), other vehicle drivers (7.4%) and service workers / shop sales workers (6.4%) (as against 2.0% to 3.5% for other occupation groups) Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 31

40 Persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for going home" (14.8%), "for making visits to residential properties in the Mainland" (7.2%) and u for leisure" (6.4%) (as against 4.2% for persons visiting the Mainland mainly "for work" and 2.2% to 5.1% for persons travelling to the Mainland for other main purposes) Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 32

41 Views on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at

42 Chapter 4 Views on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Land Boundary Control Points Views on existing arrangement of passenger clearance at land boundary control points 4.1 In the survey, all persons aged 15 and over were asked whether or not they considered the existing arrangement of passenger clearance at land boundary control points convenient. (a) The majority (82.5%) answered in the positive while 8.2% said the opposite. A small proportion (0.6%) considered that the existing arrangement was convenient at some but not all land boundary control points. Another 8.7% did not express any views because they had not used or seldom used land boundary control points in the past 12 months and so they had little knowledge about the existing arrangement of passenger clearance at land boundary control points. The proportion considering the existing arrangement of passenger clearance at land boundary control points inconvenient was higher among persons who visited the Mainland frequently 20.0% for those who visited the Mainland at least once a week, 19.9% for those who visited the Mainland less than once a week but at least once every two weeks, 14.2% for those who visited the Mainland less than once every two weeks but at least once a month, and 14.8% for those who visited the Mainland less than once a month but at least once every three months. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 33

43 (b) The major reasons for considering the existing arrangement inconvenient were "too crowded when crossing the boundary during peak hours on weekends and public holidays" (78,4%) and "too crowded when crossing the boundary during peak hours on weekdays" (38.5%). Other reasons were "control points close too early during public holidays" (3.0%) and "absence of 24-hour passenger clearance" (2.7%). For those persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week, the major reasons cited were similar "too crowded when crossing the boundary during peak hours on weekends and public holidays" (68.3%) and "too crowded when crossing the boundary during peak hours on weekdays" (56.3%). However, for persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work", the most prominent reason was "too crowded when crossing the boundary during peak hours on weekdays" (71.9%), followed by "too crowded when crossing the boundary during peak hours on weekends and public holidays" (52.4%). 4.2 For those persons who considered the existing arrangement of passenger clearance inconvenient at all or some land boundary control points (representing 8.8% of all persons aged 15 and over), they were read out the various types of arrangement of passenger clearance in Table A below and were asked to indicate which arrangement they considered as most convenient to them. The survey results show that "to reduce congestion during peak hours on weekends and public holidays" was the arrangement preferred by most, followed by "to reduce congestion during peak hours on weekdays", and "to open control points round-the-clock on days before and after long holidays", Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 34

44 Table A Tvpes of arrangement Views on different types of arrangement of passenger clearance at land boundary control points To reduce congestion during peak hours on weekends and public holidays To reduce congestion during peak hours on weekdays To open control points round-the-clock on days before and after long holidays To open control points round-the-clock every day To open control points earlier on weekends and public holidays To open control points earlier on weekdays To close control points later on weekends and public holidavs To close control points later on weekdays Sample size (1 242) Base: Persons aged 15 and over who considered the clearance at all or some land boundary control Most convenient arrangement % Up to third most convenient arrangement % existing arrangement of passenger points inconvenient Subgroup analyses show that frequent travellers and persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work" had some different views on the arrangement of passenger clearance at land boundary control points. - Among those persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week, the proportions preferring the arrangements "to reduce congestion during peak hours on weekdays" (32.8%) and "to open control points round-the-clock every day"(21.0%) were larger than those recorded for all persons aged 15 and over who considered the existing arrangement inconvenient (18.9% and 11.1% respectively). On the other hand, a smaller proportion of these frequent travellers preferred the arrangements "to reduce congestion during peak hours on weekends and public holidays" (30.1%) and "to open control points round-the-clock on days before and after long holidays"(5.8%) (44.9% and 12.9% respectively for all persons aged 15 and over who considered the existing arrangement inconvenient). Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 35

45 ~ Similarly, a larger proportion of persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work" preferred the arrangements "to reduce congestion during peak hours on weekdays" (39.8%) and "to open control points round-the-clock every day"(15.4%) while a smaller proportion preferred the arrangements "to reduce congestion during peak hours on weekends and public holidays" (24.8%) and "to open control points round-the-clock on days before and after long holidays"(7.6%). Views on 24-hour operation of land boundary control points 4.3 In the survey, all persons aged 15 and over were asked whether or not they considered 24-hour operation of land boundary control points useful to them. (a) (b) (c) The majority (86.7%) answered in the negative. 12.5% answered in the positive. The dominant reason was that "it allows them to cross the boundary at any time when there is a need" (74.0%). Other reasons were that "they would often cross the boundary during the extended hours for returning home in Hong Kong" (30.1%), "for going to work in the Mainland" (3.2%), "for shopping / leisure / meals in the Mainland" (2.8%), "for going to wdrk in Hong Kong" (2,8%) and "for visiting relatives other than spouse and children in the Mainland" (2,5%). Further analysis reveals that the higher the frequency of visitmg the Mainland through land and water boundary control points, the larger the proportion considering 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points useful (from 9.6% for persons visiting the Mainland less than once every three months to 46.8% for persons visiting the Mainland at least once a week). Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 36

46 For those frequent travellers (i.e. persons visiting the Mainland at least once a week), the reasons for considering 24-hour operation of land boundary control points useful were "it allows them to cross the boundary at any time when there is a need 5 ' (64.1%), "they would often cross the boundary during the extended hours for returning home in Hong Kong" (47.6%), "for going to work in the Mainland" (11.1%), "for going to work in Hong Kong" (9.0%) and "for going home in the Mainland" (6.3%). (d) The proportion considering 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points useful was also higher among the following persons - Persons having spouse or children in the Mainland (25.4%) (as against 11.9% for persons not having spouse or children in the Mainland) Good vehicle drivers (27.3%), other vehicle drivers (18.8%), managers / administrators (22.5%), and craft and related workers (18.0%) (as against 11.2% to 14.8% for other occupation groups) Persons who need to work in the Mainland frequently (35.5%) (as against 13.3% for persons who did not need to work in the Mainland frequently) Persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for leisure" (40.9%), "for going home" (39.0%), and "for work" (34.0%) (as against 12.7% to 31.2% for persons travelling to the Mainland for other main purposes) Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 3 7

47 4.4 For those persons who considered 24-hour operation of land boundary control points useful (representing 12.5% of all persons aged 15 and over), they were further asked to express their views in regard to the following aspects - Preferred time for implementing 24-hour operation of land boundary control points (a) 49.9% suggested that 24-hour operation of land boundary control points should be implemented as soon as possible and 16.9% within the next 12 months. This was mainly because "it allows them to cross the boundary at any time when there is a need 55 (86.0%). The proportion considering that 24-hour operation of land boundary control points should be implemented as soon as possible was particularly higher among frequent travellers who visited the Mainland at least once a week (64.3%). The corresponding proportion was also higher among persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for going home" (75.7%), "for visiting friends" (64.7%) (5), "for shopping" (61.7%), "for sightseeing" (58.3%), "for leisure" (57.8%) and "for work" (56.5%). (b) (c) However, 12.5% considered that 24-hour operation of land boundary control points should be implemented one year later and 2.1% even said that the later it was implemented the better it would be. The major reasons cited were "no urgent need for crossing the boundary during the extended hours" (48.2%), "the Government needs time to make arrangements " (30.4%), and "did not want to put Hong Kong's economy under pressure so soon" (22.9%). The remaining 18.7% did not have any preference for the time of implementing 24-hour operation of land boundary control points. Number of land boundary control points for 24-hour operation (d) Two-thirds (67.8%) considered it suffice to open one land boundary control point for 24-hour operation while 28.1% thought the opposite. 4.1% said that it would depend on which control point would operate round-the-clock. (5) Note that the estimate is based on a small sample size of 35 respondents. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 38

48 Similar views were obtained from frequent travellers who visited the Mainland at least once a week, with 71.1% considering it suffice to open one land boundary control point for 24-hour operation and 24.9% holding the opposite view. For persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work", they also expressed similar views, with 68.7% considering it suffice to open one land boundary control point for 24-hour operation and 27.5% holding the opposite view. Land boundary control point desired by most for 24-hour operation (e) Lo Wu Control Point (84.0%) was desired by most for 24-hour operation, followed far behind by Lok Ma Chau Control Point (7.7%), Hung Horn Control Point (6.1%), Man Kam To Control Point (1.6%) and Sha Tau Kok Control Point (0.5%). For frequent travellers and persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work", although the majority (78.6% and 76.2% respectively) preferred Lo Wu Control Point to be opened for 24-hour operation, a comparatively higher proportion (13.5% and 12.9% respectively) preferred Lok Ma Chau Control Point. 4.5 All persons aged 15 and over were further asked whether they would cross the boundary during the extended hours if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. (a) (b) 2.9% answered in the affirmative while the majority (86.8%) said not. 10.3% were uncertain. The demographic characteristics of the 2.9% of persons who would cross the boundary during the extended hours as well as their trip pattern to the Mainland are presented below - Demographic characteristics 68.7% were males and 31.3% females. 3.1% were of age 15 to 19, 17.7% 20 to 29, 33.1% 30 to 39, 28.8% 40 to 49, 12.3% 50 to 59 and 4.9% 60 and over. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 39

49 26,3% were single, 67.2% married and 6.5% separated / divorced / widowed. 12,5% had spouse or children in the Mainland. 81.7% were economically active persons. - Among them, 21.1% were managers / administrators, 18.7% service workers / shop sales workers, 17,6% professionals / associate professionals, 12.4% craft and related workers, 10.1% clerks, 7.9% persons engaged in elementary occupations, 6.5% goods vehicle drivers, 3.9% other vehicle drivers, and 0.7% plant and machine operators / assemblers (excluding drivers). 18.3% were economically inactive persons, with 9.6% being homemakers, 4.1% retired persons, 3.7% students and 0.9% other economically active persons. 10,5% usually lived in Yuen Long, 3.8% North and 83.9% other districts in Hong Kong. The remaining 1.7% usually lived in the Mainland of China. Trip pattern to the Mainland 29.3% were frequent travellers who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week. 32.4% visited the Mainland mainly "for work", 14.2% "for leisure", 13.3% "for shopping", 11.1% "for going home", 11.1% "for visiting relatives other than spouse and children", and 10.3% "for sightseeing". 64.0% usually crossed the boundary to the Mainland during weekdays, with 40.3% from Monday to Thursday and 23.7% on Friday usually crossed the boundary to the Mainland during weekends, with 35.5% on Saturday and 16,8% on Sunday. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 40

50 68.1% usually crossed the boundary to the Mainland between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. while 24.1% usually crossed the boundary to the Mainland between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m. and 5.6% after 9 p.m. (c) Further analyses of the 2.9% reveal that a higher proportion of the following persons would cross the boundary during the extended hours - Persons aged 30 to 39 (4.3%) and persons aged 40 to 49 (3.9%) (as against 1.2% for persons aged 15 to 19, 3.0% for persons aged 20 to 29 and 0.8% to 2.9% for persons aged 50 and over) Persons having spouse or children in the Mainland (8.4%) (as against 2.7% for persons not having spouse nor children in the Mainland) Goods vehicle drivers (11.0%), managers / administrators (7.0%), and service workers / shop sales workers (4.9%) (as against 2.3% to 4.0% for other occupation groups) Persons who need to work in the Mainland frequently (12.3%) (as against 3.1% for person who did not need to work in the Mainland frequently) The more frequent travellers 20.9% for persons who visited the Mainland at least once a week, 10.8% for persons who visited the Mainland less than once a week but at least once every two weeks, 9.1% for persons who visited the Mainland less than once every two weeks but at least once a month and 6.0% for persons who visited the Mainland less than once a month but at least once every three months (as against 1.5% for persons who visited the Mainland less than once every three months and 0.6% for persons who had not visited the Mainland in the past 12 months) Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points mainly "for leisure" (18.0%), "for going home" (15.3%), "for work" (11.6%), "for visiting friends" (10.8%), and "for shopping" (9.7%). Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 41

51 Persons living in Yuen Long (4.8%) (as against 2.6% for persons living in North and 2.8% for persons living in other districts in Hong Kong) 4.6 For those persons who would cross the boundary during the extended hours if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points (representing 2.9% of all persons aged 15 and over), they were asked how often and for what purpose they would cross the boundary during the extended hours. The results are given below - Expected frequency of crossing the boundary during the extended hours (a) 28.1% would cross the boundary during the extended hours frequently and 59.4% occassionally while 12.6% would seldom do so. Perceived main purpose for crossing the boundary during the extended hours (b) 'Tor going home in Hong Kong" (56.5%) was the most common purpose for crossing the boundary during the extended hours, followed by "for urgent matters" (24.6%), "for shopping / leisure / meals in the Mainland" (5.6%), "for going home in the Mainland" (3.7%) and "for work in Hong Kong" (3.6%). Further analyses show that a considerably higher proportion of frequent travellers would cross the boundary during the extended hours frequently (48.0%). Their main purposes for crossing the boundary during the extended hours were "for urgent matters" (18.3%), "for work in Hong Kong" (9.0%), "for going home in Hong Kong" (57.3%), "for work in the Mainland" (5.8%), and "for going home in the Mainland" (4.8%). Similarly, a considerably higher proportion of persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work" would cross the boundary during the extended hours frequently (37.7%). Their main purposes for crossing the boundary during the extended hours were "for going home in Hong Kong" (67.5%), "for urgent matters" (18.2%), "for work in the Mainland" (9.8%), and "for work in Hong Kong" (4.5%). Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 42

52 Impact on Pattern of Trips to the Mainland if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at

53 Chapter 5 Impact on Pattern of Trips to the Mainland if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at Number of visits to the Mainland and duration of stay per trip 5.1 For those persons aged 15 and over who had visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points in the past 12 months (representing 63.9% of all persons aged 15 and over), they were asked whether they would make more visits or fewer visits to the Mainland if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. (a) (b) 7.0% said that they would make more visits to the Mainland while 0.1% would make fewer visits. Most (92.9%), however, would make similar number of visits to the Mainland. Further analyses indicate that a higher proportion of the following persons would make more visits to the Mainland if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points - Persons having spouse in the Mainland (14.3%) (as against 6.9% for persons not having spouse in the Mainland) Goods vehicle drivers (17.1%) (as against 6.2% to 10.6% for other occupation groups) Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week (16.5%) or less than once a week but at least once every two weeks (14.7%) (as against 4.1% to 12.2% for persons who visited the Mainland less often) Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points mainly "for going home" (15.4%), "for visiting friends (21.6%), "for leisure" (22.2%) and "for sightseeing" (16.1%) (as against 9.5% for persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work" and 5.6% to 13.7% for persons visiting the Mainland for other main purposes) Persons who would cross the boundary during the extended hours if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points (53.3%) (as against 1.9% for persons who would not do so) Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 43

54 5.2 In regard to the duration of stay per trip, most (90.4%) said that they would maintain their duration of stay per trip to the Mainland even if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. (a) (b) (c) 8.5% said that they would stay longer per trip to the Mainland. The dominant reason was "staying longer for entertainment in the Mainland" (83.2%), followed by "staying longer for work in the Mainland" (12.1%) and "staying overnight in the Mainland more often" (8.7%). 1.2% said that they would shorten their trips because "they would stay overnight in the Mainland less often" (83.5%) and "they would return to Hong Kong more often" (22.5%). Further analyses indicate that a higher proportion of the following persons would lengthen their duration of stay per trip to the Mainland- Persons having spouse in the Mainland (14.0%) (as against 8.5% for persons not having spouse in the Mainland) Goods vehicle drivers (15.3%) (as against 5.0% to 11.4% for other occupation groups) Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week (16.8%), persons who visited the Mainland less than once a week but at least once every two weeks (15.7%) and persons who visited the Mainland less than once every two weeks but at least once a month (15.2%) (as against 5.8% to 11.9% for persons who visited the Mainland less often) Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points mainly "for leisure" (25.8%), "for visiting friends (19.9%), "for going home" (16.9%), "for shopping" (19.0%) and "for sightseeing" (14.0%) (as against 9.7% for persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work" and 7.0% to 11.5% for persons visiting the Mainland for other main purposes) Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 44

55 Persons who would cross the boundary during the extended hours if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points (45.8%) (as against 3.3% for persons who would not do so) (d) On the other hand, a higher proportion of the following persons would shorten their duration of stay per trip to the Mainland- Managers / administrators (3.7%) and plant and machine operators / assemblers (but excluding drivers) (6) (5.5%) (as against 0.5% to 1.7% for other occupation groups) Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week (3.8%), persons who visited the Mainland less than once a week but at least once every two weeks (2.7%), persons who visited the Mainland less than once every two weeks but at least once a month (2.4%) (as against 0.6% to 1.8% for persons who visited the Mainland less often) Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points mainly "for leisure" (4.6%) and "for work" (4.2%) (as against 1.0% to 3.3% for persons visiting the Mainland for other main purposes) Persons who would cross the boundary during the extended hours if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points (11.0%) (as against 0.3% for persons who would not do so) Persons usually living in the Mainland of China (6.1%) (as against 1.1% for persons usually living in Hong Kong) (6) Note that the estimate is based on a small sample size of 35 respondents. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 45

56 Activities in the Mainland 5.3 For the persons who would change their number of visits to the Mainland or their duration of stay per trip to the Mainland (representing 7.5% of all persons aged 15 and over), they were asked which types of activities they would be engaged in more often or less often in the Mainland. The results are given below - (a) (b) The most common activities they would be engaged in more often in the Mainland were "having meals / drinks" (27.1%), "participating in leisure activities" (25.8%) and "going shopping" (24.1%). Other activities were "visiting relatives other than spouse and children" (15.8%), "going to work" (13.7%), "staying overnight in the Mainland" (12.7%) and "visiting friends" (10.5%). About one-tenth (9.6%), however, said that there would not be any activity they would be engaged in more in the Mainland. In regard to the activities they would be engaged in less often in the Mainland, the dominant one was "staying overnight in the Mainland" (18.8%). This response was given by 23.1% of persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work". The majority (80.2%), however, said that there would not be any activity they would be engaged in less often in the Mainland. Monthly expenditure in the Mainland 5.4 Of those persons who visited the Mainland at least once a month and would change their number of visits or their duration of stay per trip to the Mainland (representing 2.5% of all persons aged 15 and over), 63.0% said that they would spend more in the Mainland per month if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points while 4.7% would spend less. The remaining 32.3% said that the amount of their monthly expenditure in the Mainland would be more or less the same. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 46

57 5.5 Further analyses indicate the following variations in the impact of 24-hour passenger clearance on the amount of monthly expenditure in the Mainland among different persons - (a) (b) (c) A higher proportion of persons living in Yuen Long said that they would spend more in the Mainland (77.7%) (7) A higher proportion (36.7%) of frequent travellers who visited the Mainland at least once a week said that the amount of their monthly expenditure in the Mainland would be more or less the same. Of those persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for work", a higher proportion said that they would spend less (10.6%) or about the same amount (40.4%) in the Mainland per month. (7) Note that the estimate is based on a small sample size of 41 respondents. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 4 7

58 Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 48

59 Impact on Housing Demand in Hong Kong if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at

60 Chapter 6 Impact on Housing Demand in Hong Kong if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at Impact on housing demand in Hong Kong 6.1 Of all persons aged 18 and over, it was estimated that 35.9% (or some persons) currently owned residential properties in Hong Kong and 5.3% (or some persons) had plans to purchase residential properties in Hong Kong in the next three years. (a) Of those persons who currently owned residential properties in Hong Kong, nearly all (98.0%) would keep their residential properties in Hong Kong if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. 2.0% said that they would sell their properties in Hong Kong and similar results were recorded for persons living in North (1.5%) and Yuen Long (2.3%), However, the proportion who said that they would sell their properties in Hong Kong was higher proportion among the following persons - Persons having spouse or children in the Mainland (5.1%) ( as against 1.9% for persons not having spouse or children in the Mainland) Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a week (4.6%) or less than once a week but at least once every two weeks (5.8%) (as against 1.0% to 2.9% for persons who visited the Mainland less often) Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points mainly for "making visits to residential properties in the Mainland" (6.5%), "for visiting relatives other than spouse and children" (5.0%) and "for visiting friends" (4.9%). Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 49

61 (b) As for those persons who had plans to purchase residential properties in Hong Kong in the next three years, the majority (89.5%) said that the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would not affect their plans. However, 7.0% said that they would delay their plans and 2.3% would even cancel their plans while 1.1% would speed up their plans. The dominant reason for delaying or cancelling their plans of purchasing residential properties in Hong Kong were "they worry that property prices in Hong Kong would drop" (85.7%). Other reasons were "they would take up residence in the Mainland" (9.1%) and "they would purchase a residential property in the Mainland" (8.8%) if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. Impact on housing demand in the Mainland 6.2 Of all persons aged 18 and over, it was estimated that 10.4% (or some persons) currently owned (8) or rented residential properties in the Mainland; and 2.8% (or some persons) had plans to purchase, build or rent residential properties in the Mainland in the next three years. (a) Of those persons who had plans to purchase, build or rent residential properties in the Mainland (representing 2.8% of all persons aged 18 and over), the majority (73.1%) said that the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would not affect their plans. However, 24.7% said that they would speed up their plans while 1.3% would delay their plans and 0.9% would cancel their plans. The major reasons for speeding up their plans to purchase, build or rent residential properties in the Mainland were "they would visit the Mainland more often" (52.4%), "they would take up residence in the Mainland" (30.8%) and "they expect that property prices in the Mainland would rise" (22.8%). (8) Including properties which were purchased, built and inherited. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 50

62 (b) Of those persons who did not have plans to purchase, build or rent residential properties in the Mainland in the next three years (representing 97.2% of all persons aged 18 and over), nearly all (97,9%) said that they would not consider doing so even if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. However, 0,4% would and 1.7% might consider doing so because "they would visit the Mainland more often" (55.8%), "they would take up residence in the Mainland" (32.9%) and "they expect that the property prices in the Mainland would rise" (12.9%). Impact on aspiration to take up residence in the Mainland 6.3 In the survey, all household heads were asked whether their entire households intended to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years. It was estimated that some households (0.9%) had such an intention but nearly all (99.0%) did not. (5) (a) (b) (c) Analyzed by district of residence, the proportion having an intention to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years was lower among households living in North (0.2%) as compared with households living in Yuen Long (1.2%) and other districts in Hong Kong (0.9%). Of those households that had an intention to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years (representing 0.9% of all households), the majority (79.1%) said that the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would not affect their plans. However, the remaining 20.9% would s peed up their plans. Of those households that did not intend to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years (representing 99.0% of all households), 0.1% said that they would probably take up residence in the Mainland if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points but nearly all (99,4%) would not. The remaining 0.6% were uncertain. (5) A very small proportion (0.04%) of households said that they were already residing in the Mainland. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 51

63 For households living in North and Yuen Long, none would take up residence in the Mainland if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. (d) Of those households that intended to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years and those that would consider taking up residence in the Mainland if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points (representing 1.6% of all households), 46.4% would return their present accommodation in Hong Kong to the owners when they took up residence in the Mainland. 24.8% would keep it for self-occupation while about one-tenth would lease it out (11.5%) or sell it (10.8%). 6.4 For cases where the household heads said that their entire households did not intend to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years, their household members aged 18 and over were asked individually about their intention to take up residence in the Mainland. Including the members of cases where the entire household intended to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years, the survey results indicate that 1.4% of all persons aged 18 and over (or some persons) had an intention to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years while most (98.1%) did not have such an intention. (9) (a) Analyzed by district of residence, the proportion having an intention to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years was lower among those living in North (0.3%) but higher among those living in Yuen Long (2.3%) and those usually living in the Mainland of China (2.6%). (9) A small proportion (0.5%) of persons aged 18 and over said that they were already residing in the Mainland. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 52

64 (b) (c) Of those persons who intended to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years (representing 1.4% of all persons aged 18 and over), 19.8% said that they would speed up their plans if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. This was because "it allows them to return to Hong Kong at any time when there is a need" (94.3%) and "they can return to the Mainland even they work late in Hong Kong" (11.3%). However, the majority (79.3%) said that the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would not affect their plans and 0.8% would delay their plans. Of those persons who did not have an intention to take up residence in the Mainland in the next three years (representing 98.1% of all persons aged 18 and over), most (98.9%) said that they would not consider taking up residence in the Mainland even if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. However, 0.2% would or might consider doing so because "it allows them to return to Hong Kong at any time when there is a need" (883%). Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 53

65 Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 54

66 Impact on Employment in Hong Kong if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at

67 Chapter 7 Impact on Employment in Hong Kong if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at Land Boundary Control Points Whether would accept taking up employment that need to work in the Mainland frequently 7.1 It was estimated that 56.5% (or some persons) of all persons aged 15 and over were employed persons and 5.1% (or some persons) were unemployed persons. 7.2 In the survey, all employed persons were asked whether they had to work in the Mainland frequently and, if not, whether they would accept taking up employment that required them to work in the Mainland frequently. (a) The survey results indicate that one-tenth (9.7%) of those employed persons had to work in the Mainland frequently. (b) (c) Of the remaining 90.3% of employed persons, 39.8% said that they would accept taking up employment that required them to work in the Mainland frequently while 49.0% would not. Subgroup analyses indicate that a higher proportion of the following employed persons would accept taking up employment that required them to work in the Mainland frequently - Males (45.7%) (as against 32.0% for females) Persons aged 30 to 39 (44.9%) (as against 18.3% to 40.5% for other age groups) The more educated (46.0% for persons having attained education at matriculation level or above) (as against 16.3% to 41.0% for persons having attained other education levels) Persons having spouse or children in the Mainland (51.0%) (as against 393% for persons not having spouse or children in the Mainland) Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 55

68 Managers / administrators (45.4%), professionals / associate professionals (46.9%), craft and related workers (46.4%) and goods vehicle drivers (46.3%) (as against 21.7% to 39.4% for other occupation groups) Persons engaged in construction work (47.3%) (as against 34.7% to 43.4% for other industry groups) The higher income group (51.0% for persons with a monthly personal income of HK$20,000 or more) (as against 15.3% to 43.7% for persons with a monthly personal income of less than HK$20,000) Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once every three months (58.2% for those visiting the Mainland at least once a month and 46.9% for those visiting the Mainland less than once a month but at least once every three months) (as against 39.9% for those who visited the Mainland less often) Persons living in North (47.3%) (as against 37.5% for persons living in Yuen Long and 39.6% for persons living in other districts in Hong Kong) 7.3 For unemployed persons, they were asked whether they would accept taking up employment or business opportunity that required them to work in the Mainland frequently. (a) (b) The survey results indicate that 49.3% of unemployed persons would accept taking up employment or business opportunity that required them to work in the Mainland frequently while 41.1% would not. Subgroup analyses indicate that a higher proportion of the following unemployed persons would accept taking up employment or business opportunity that required them to work in the Mainland frequently - Males (57.2%) (as against 37.3% for females) Persons aged 30 to 39 (56.1%) (as against 35.6% to 50.8% for other age groups) Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 56

69 The more educated (69.0% for persons having attained education at matriculation level or above) (as against 43.4% to 48.4% for persons having attained other education levels) Persons having spouse or children in the Mainland (71.3%) (10) (as against 48.1% for persons not having spouse or children in the Mainland) Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a month (76.0%) (as against 37.9% to 51.0% for those who visited the Mainland less often) Persons living in North (55.5%) (as against 40.4% for persons living in Yuen Long and 49.6% for persons living in other districts in Hong Kong) 7.4 Taking together employed and unemployed persons who would not accept taking up employment and / or business opportunity that required them to work in the Mainland frequently (representing persons or 33.3% of all persons aged 15 and over), 5.8% said that they would accept if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. (a) (b) The dominant reason was "it allows them to return to Hong Kong at any time when there is a need" (95.9%). Further analyses show that a higher proportion of the following persons would accept taking up employment and / or business opportunity that required them to work in the Mainland frequently if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points - Persons who visited the Mainland through land or water boundary control points at least once a month (11.9%) (as against 5.0% to 5.9% for those who visited the Mainland less often) (10) Note that the estimate is based on a small sample size of 44 persons. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 5 7

70 Persons living in Yuen Long (13.0%) (as against 4,3% for persons living in North and 5.3% for persons living in other districts in Hong Kong) 7.5 All economically active persons were asked whether or not they would consider taking up work of a different job nature or business nature if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. (a) (b) A very small proportion (0.3% or some persons) answered in the positive. The reasons were "there would be more people travelling to the Mainland" (33.7%), "more job or business opportunities would be available" (32.6%), and "able to travel between the Mainland and Hong Kong at any time" (13.1%). Most (97.9%), however, replied in the negative. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 58

71 Impact on Family Relationship if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at

72 Chapter 8 Impact on Family Relationship if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at Land Boundary Control Points 8.1 In the survey, all persons aged 15 and over who were living with their spouse, children and / or parents in Hong Kong were asked whether or not the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would affect their gathering time and relationship. The results are presented below - (a) Most said that the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would not affect their gathering time with their spouse (97.1%), children (97.5%) and parents (97.5%). A very small proportion said that their gathering time would increase (0.5%, 0.4% and 0.2% respectively) or decrease (2.3%, 2.1% and 2.3% respectively). Similar results were recorded for persons living in North and Yuen Long, Most said that their gathering time with their spouse (96.9% and 96.5% respectively), children (98.0% and 97.5% respectively) and parents (98.8% and 99.0% respectively) would not be affected. However, analyzed by their frequency of visiting the Mainland through land or water boundary control points, the proportion who considered that they would have less gathering time with their spouse, children or parents in Hong Kong was higher among persons who visited the Mainland at least once a week (5.0%, 4.9% and 7.1% respectively). At the same time, a higher proportion of the same group of persons considered that they would have more gathering time with their spouse, children and parents (4.6%, 3.5% and 1.3% respectively). Further analyses show that a higher proportion of persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for leisure" considered that they would have less gathering time with their spouse (7.3%), children (8.5%) and parents (9.5%) in Hong Kong if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 59

73 (b) In regard to their relationship, nearly all said that their relationship with their spouse (98.2%), children (98.9%) and parents (99.4%) in Hong Kong would remain unchanged. A very small proportion said that their relationship would improve (0.4%, 0.3% and 0.1% respectively) or deteriorate (1.4%, 0.8% and 0.5% respectively). Similar results were recorded for persons living in North and Yuen Long. Nearly all said that their relationship with their spouse (97.7% and 96.8% respectively), children (99.5% and 97.8% respectively) and parents (99.1% and 99.0% respectively) would not be affected. However, analyzed by their frequency of visiting the Mainland through land or water boundary control points, the proportion who considered that their relationship with their spouse, children and parents in Hong Kong would deteriorate was slightly higher among persons who visited the Mainland at least once a week (3.1%, 2.3% and 1.7% respectively). At the same time, a slightly higher proportion of the same group of persons considered that their relationship with their spouse, children and parents would improve (3.3%, 2.5% and 1.3% respectively) as compared with persons who visited the Mainland less often. Further analyses show that a slightly higher proportion of persons who visited the Mainland mainly "for leisure" considered that their relationship with their spouse, children and parents in Hong Kong would deteriorate (4.3%, 3.4% and 1.6% respectively) if 24-hour passenger clearance was provided at land boundary control points. Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 60

74 Impact on Law and Order in Hong Kong if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at

75 Chapter 9 Impact on Law and Order in Hong Kong if 24-hour Passenger Clearance Was Provided at 9.1 All persons aged 15 and over were asked whether they considered the implementation of 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points would affect the law and order in their district of residence when keeping all other factors constant. (a) (b) Most (92.4%) considered that there would not be any impact on law and order. However, 7.3% considered that law and order in their district of residence would become worse, especially for persons living in North (19.5%) and Yuen Long (12.0%). The major reasons were "more people would pass through their districts" (67.0%), "criminals would flee to the Mainland conveniently" (22.5%), and "there would be more illegal immigrants from the Mainland" (6.2%). Household Survey on 24-hour Passenger Clearance at Page 61

76 X HK H84 f Household survey on 24-hour passenger clearance at land boundary control points : final report Date Due "3 i OT FOR LC AN

77

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