GRADE 2 Communities Here and across the World

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1 Standard 2-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of cultural contributions made by people from the various regions of the United States : Recognize the basic elements that make up a cultural region in the United States, including language, customs, and economic activities. (G, H, E, P) Taxonomy Level: A 1 Remembering Factual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: In the first grade (1-1.2) students learned the ways in which people are both alike and different from one another in different regions of the United States and the world, including their culture, language, and jobs. In the fourth grade (4-5.6) they will be asked to compare the experiences of different groups who migrated and settled in the West, including their reasons for migrating, their experiences on the trails and at their destinations, the cooperation and conflict between and among the different groups, and the nature of their daily lives. It is essential for students to know the distinct characteristics of a cultural region, the natural features of cultural regions in the U.S., and the meaning of cultural diversity. Students should know examples of these characteristics and features such as language, customs, and economic activities. Students should understand the diversity of these features across the United States. It is not essential for students to know specific language, customs, and economic activities of people in regions outside of the United States. Students do not have to compare specific, diverse cultural characteristics of regions across the United States. Appropriate assessment requires students to recognize the basic elements of a cultural region, therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be to identify elements such as language, customs, and economic activities within regions of the United States. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

2 Standard 2-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of cultural contributions made by people from the various regions of the United States : Compare the historic traditions, customs, and cultures of various regions in the United States, including how traditions are passed between and among generations. (G, H) Taxonomy Level: B 2 Understanding /Conceptual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: In first grade (1-1.2 and 1-1.3) students learned the ways in which people are both alike and different from one another in different regions of the United States and the world, including their culture, language, and jobs and also learned to illustrate their personal and family histories on a time line. In fifth grade (5.3.4) students will learn to summarize the significance of large-scale immigration and the contributions of immigrants to America in the early 1900s, including the countries from which they came, and the cultural and economic contributions they made to this nation. They will also understand changes in daily life in the boom period of the 1920s, including the improved standard of living; the popularity of new technology such as automobiles, airplanes, radio, and movies; the Harlem Renaissance and the Great Migration; Prohibition; and racial and ethnic conflict (5-4.1). It is essential for students to know how family traditions and customs are passed down from each generation. Students should know how to create a timeline of family events and how to use graphic organizers to compare cultural regions of the United States. It is not essential for students to know how to make comparisons of traditions, customs and cultures of other nations beyond the United States. Students do not need to compare regional features beyond culture and tradition or features related to geography, political, resources and trade. Appropriate assessment requires students to compare historic traditions, customs, and cultures of various regions in the U.S. and to understand how traditions are passed on; therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be to compare characteristics of various regions in the United States. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 2

3 Standard 2-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of cultural contributions made by people from the various regions of the United States : Summarize the cultural contributions of Native American nations, African Americans, and immigrant groups in different regions of the United States. Taxonomy Level: A 2 Understanding /Factual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: This is the first time students are introduced to specific contributions of cultural groups in the United States. In third grade (3-2.4, 3-2.7) students will learn about the culture, governance, and geographic locations of different Native American nations in South Carolina, including the three principal nations Cherokee, Catawba, and Yemassee that influenced the development of colonial South Carolina. Further, in fourth grade (4-2.5, 4-2.7) students will summarize the introduction and establishment of slavery in the American colonies, including the role of the slave trade; the nature of the Middle Passage; and explain how conflicts and cooperation among the Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans influenced colonial events including the French and Indian Wars, slave revolts, Native American wars, and trade. Fourth grade students (4-6.2) will also learn about the roles and accomplishments of the leaders of the abolitionist movement and the Underground Railroad before and during the Civil War. In fifth grade (5-3.4, 5-5.2) students will discover the significance of large-scale immigration and the contributions of immigrants to America in the early 1900s, including the countries from which they came, and the cultural and economic contributions they made to this nation and discover the advancement of the civil rights movement in the United States, including key events and people. Further, in eight grade (8-1.4) students will understand the growth of the African American population during the colonial period and the significance of African Americans in the developing culture (e.g., Gullah) and economy of South Carolina. Later, in high school US history (USHC-5.6, 5.7, 7.2) students will explain the influx of immigrants into the United States in the late nineteenth century in relation to the specific economic, political, and social changes that resulted; compare the accomplishments and limitations of the progressive movement in effecting social and political reforms in America; and explain cultural responses to the period of economic boom-and-bust, including the Harlem Renaissance; new trends in literature, music, and art; and the effects of radio and movies It is essential for students to summarize the cultural contributions of Native American nations, African Americans and immigrant groups. Students should be able to define and identify significant contributions made by each of these groups throughout United States history. It is not essential for students to know specific biographical and historical information about Native Americans, African Americans, and immigrant groups. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 2

4 Standard 2-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of cultural contributions made by people from the various regions of the United States. Appropriate assessment requires students to summarize cultural contributions from Native American nations, African Americans, and immigrants; therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be to generalize the cultural contributions of each group. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 2

5 Standard 2-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of cultural contributions made by people from the various regions of the United States : Recall stories and songs about regional folk figures who have contributed to the development of the cultural history of the United States, including Pecos Bill, Brer Rabbit, Paul Bunyan, Davy Crockett, and John Henry. (G,H) Taxonomy Level: A 1 Remembering /Factual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: This is the first time students use songs and stories to learn about historic and regional folklore. This is the first time students learn about Pecos Bill, Paul Bunyan, Davie Crockett, and John Henry. In later grades students will learn about other key historical figures who have contributed to the cultural history of the United States. It is essential for students to know specific elements of these stories and individual life histories as they relate to America s history and development. It is also essential to understand the basis for folklore, which incorporates both fictional and non-fictional elements. It is not essential for students to know detailed biographical information of these characters or individuals. Appropriate assessment requires students to recall stories and songs about folk figures; therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be to retrieve this information from memory. However, appropriate assessments should also require students to identify these characters and recognize their contributions. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

6 Standard 2-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the local community and the way it compares with other communities in the world : Locate on a map the places and features of the local community, including the geographic features (e. g., parks, water features) and the urban, suburban, and rural areas. (G) Taxonomy Level: C 3 Apply/ Procedural Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: Students were introduced to basic maps skills in Kindergarten where they constructed maps (K-5.3) and also in first grade (1-2.2) when students identified a familiar area or neighborhood on a simple map, using the basic map symbols and the cardinal directions. Later, in third grade (3-1.1) students will identify on a map the location and characteristics of significant physical features of South Carolina, including landforms; river systems such as the Pee Dee River Basin, the Santee River Basin, the Edisto River Basin, and the Savannah River Basin; major cities; and climate regions. In fourth grade (4-1.3) students will learn to use a map to identify the routes of various sea and land expeditions to the New World and match these to the territories claimed by different nations. As well, in fifth grade (5-6.1) student will use a map to identify the regions of United States political involvement since the fall of the communist states, including places in the Middle East, Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, the Balkans in Europe, and Asia. It is essential for students to know how to read a map legend; identify bodies of water, parks and symbols for city government; identify rural features such as farmland; and identify key elements of suburban communities. Students must also understand the meaning and characterization of urban, suburban, and rural areas. It is not essential for students to know the political and geographic features of their state, nation, and world. It is not necessary for students to know the specific geographic and community features of their specific local community on a map; they need to understand map features and characteristics from a representative local community. Further, students do not need to understand the many different types of maps and related map legends that can illustrate information. Appropriate assessment requires students to locate specific physical features of a local community on a map; therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be for students to recall and illustrate the key features of a representative local community on a map. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

7 Standard 2-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the local community and the way it compares with other communities in the world : Recognize characteristics of the local region, including its geographic features and natural resources. (G, E) Taxonomy Level: A 1 Remember/ Factual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: In first grade (1-1.5) students learned to illustrate different elements of community life, including the structure of schools; typical jobs; the interdependence of family, school, and the community; and the common methods of transportation and communication. In third grade students will be discussing significant physical features of South Carolina. They will learn to identify on a map the location and characteristics of significant physical features of South Carolina (3-1.1); interpret thematic maps of South Carolina places and regions that show how and where people live, work, and use land and transportation (3-1.2); categorize the six geographic regions of South Carolina according to their different physical and human characteristics (3-1.3); and explain the effects of human systems on the physical landscape of South Carolina over time, including the relationship of population distribution and patterns of migration to natural resources, climate, agriculture, and economic development (3-1.4). It is essential for students to know the meaning of natural resources, along with specific geographic features. Students must be able to identify those resources that are relevant to their local region. It is not essential for students to know the geographic features for the entire state of South Carolina. Students do not need to understand the diversity of natural resources across the state or nation. Appropriate assessment requires students to recognize the geographical features and natural resources of a local region; therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be to recall essential features of the local community and locate them on a map. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

8 Standard 2-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the local community and the way it compares with other communities in the world : Summarize the roles of various workers in the community, including those who hold government jobs there. (E) Taxonomy Level: B 2 Understanding Conceptual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: In first grade (1-1.5) students learned to illustrate different elements of community life, including the structure of schools; typical jobs; the interdependence of family, school, and the community; and the common methods of transportation and communication. Later, in second grade (2-3.2) students will learn to identify the roles of leaders and officials in local government, including law enforcement and public safety officials. It is essential for students to know the characteristics of important public officials in their local community. It is essential for students to be able to summarize the responsibilities of community workers such as police officers and firefighters who deal with safety, teachers and principals who deal with education, and doctors, nurses who deal with our health.. It is not essential for students to know the names of specific workers in the community. It is also not essential for students to understand the educational background of individuals that hold these positions or whether these jobs are appointed or elected positions. Appropriate assessment would require students to summarize the roles performed by community workers; therefore the primary focus of assessment should be to generalize key characteristics and responsibilities of different community workers and local government positions. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

9 Standard 2-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the local community and the way it compares with other communities in the world : Summarize changes that have occurred in the life of the local community over time, including changes in the use of land and the way that people earn their living there. (G, E, H) Taxonomy Level: B 2 Understanding /Conceptual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: In the first grade (1-1.4) students compared the daily life of families across the world including the roles of men, women, and children; typical food, clothes, and style of homes; and the ways the families earn their living. They also illustrated different elements of community life, including the structure of schools; typical jobs; the interdependence of family, school, and the community; and the common methods of transportation and communication. Later, in third grade (3-1.4) students will study the effects of human systems on the physical landscape of South Carolina over time; including the relationship of population distribution and patterns of migration to natural resources, climate, agriculture, and economic development. In fourth and fifth (4-5.4, 5-2.2) grade, respectively, students will learn how territorial expansion and related land policies affected Native Americans, and illustrate the effects of settlement on the environment of the West, including changes in the physical and human systems. In high school (ECON-1.2) students will explain the concept of opportunity costs and how individuals, families, communities, and nations make economic decisions on that basis, including analyzing marginal costs and marginal benefits and assessing how their choices may result in trade-offs. It is essential for students to know the many ways people use land in the local community and to identify the different types of jobs that exist within the community. Students should know local examples of highways, recreation areas, forests, lakes, farmland, and other land resource examples. Students should understand how land use and jobs within their community have changed over time. It is not essential for students to know geographic characteristics of other regions of the country. It is also not necessary for students to understand the economic features of other communities across the nation. Appropriate assessment will require students to summarize economic and land resource changes in the local community; therefore the primary focus of assessment should be to generalize significant changes in land use and in the ways people earn a living within the local community over time. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

10 Standard 2-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the local community and the way it compares with other communities in the world : Compare the history and features of the local community with those of different communities around the world. (G) Taxonomy Level: B 2 Understanding /Conceptual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: In the first grade (1-1.4) students compared the daily lives of families across the world including the roles of men, women, and children; typical food, clothes, and style of homes; and the ways the families earn their living. In sixth grade (6-1.4, 6-4.1) students will compare the cultural, social, and political features and contributions of civilizations in the Tigris and Euphrates, Nile, Indus, and Huang He river valleys, and compare the features and major contributions of the African civilizations of Ghana, Mali, and Songhai, including the influence of geography on their growth and the impact of Islam and Christianity on their cultures. In seventh grade (7-1.3) students will compare how European nations exercised political and economic influence differently in the Americas, including tradingpost empires, plantation colonies, and settler colonies. It is essential for students to know the elements of the history and culture of their own local community. Students must also be able to compare this information to select communities around the world. It is not essential for students to know the history and culture of all (or many) world communities. Appropriate assessment requires students to compare the history and features of the local community with communities around the world; therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be to contrast the similarities and differences between select communities around the world. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

11 Standard 2-3: The student will demonstrate an understanding of origins, structure, and functions of local government Recognize types of local laws and those people who have the power and authority to enforce them. (P) Taxonomy Level: A 1 Remembering/Factual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: In first grade (1-3.2, 1-3.4) students learned the concept of authority and gave examples of people in authority, including school officials, public safety officers, and government officials and discovered possible consequences of an absence of laws and rules, including the potential for disorderliness and violence. Later, in high school (USG-3.2, USG-3.3) students will explain the organization and responsibilities of local and state governments, the relationships among national, state, and local levels of government; and the structure and operation of South Carolina s government. They will learn to summarize the function of law in the American constitutional system, including the significance of the concept of the due process of law and the ways in which laws are intended to achieve fairness, the protection of individual rights, and the promotion of the common good. It is essential for students to know examples of local laws that are part of the local government structure. Students need to know examples of people who create and enforce the laws such as the mayor, city council, and the police, as well as principals and teachers. Students should know examples related to school rules, traffic laws, and basic criminal laws. It is not essential for students to know the details of criminal enforcement, including things like sentencing guidelines for particular crimes that have been committed. Students do not need to understand the procedures for passing laws or the names of specific community law enforcement individuals. Appropriate assessment requires students to recognize types of local laws; therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be to recall examples of local laws, along with identifying the duties and responsibilities to the community that individuals have who are responsible for enforcing these laws. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

12 Standard 2-3: The student will demonstrate an understanding of origins, structure, and functions of local government : Identify the roles of leaders and officials in local government, including law enforcement and public safety officials. (P) Taxonomy Level: A 1 Remember/ Factual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: In the first grade (1-3.2) students summarized the concept of authority and gave examples of people in authority, including school officials, public safety officers, and government officials. Later, in second grade (2-3.3) students will explain the ways that local and state governments contribute to the federal system, including law enforcement and highway construction. In high school (USG-1.1, USG-1.2) students will learn to summarize arguments for the necessity and purpose of government and politics, including the idea that the purposes of government include enhancing economic prosperity and providing for national security. They will also understand the differing ideas about the purposes and functions of law, including the rule of law and the rule of man and the idea that the rule of law protects not only individual rights but also the common good. It is essential for students to know the role(s) of local public officials such as the mayor, city council, police officers, and judges. Students should understand how these local officials assist with the affairs of local government, especially in the creation and enforcement of laws and which contribute to keeping the community safe. It is not essential for students to know specific personal histories or background information of local leaders. Students do not need to understand how these individuals came to these positions or whether they are appointed or elected positions. Appropriate assessment requires students to identify the role of leaders and officials; therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be for students to recall the duties and responsibilities of local community officials. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

13 Standard 2-3: The student will demonstrate an understanding of origins, structure, and functions of local government : Explain the way that local and state governments contribute to the federal system, including law enforcement and highway construction. (P) Taxonomy Level: C 2 Understanding /Procedural Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: In first grade (1-3.3) students identified ways that government affects the daily lives of individuals and families in the United States, including providing public education, building roads and highways, and promoting personal freedom and opportunity for all. In high school (USG-2.1) students will summarize the basic principles of American democracy including popular sovereignty, the rule of law, the balance of power, the separation of powers, limited government, federalism, and representative government as expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Also in high school (ECON-6.1) students will compare the various functions and roles of the government in the United States economy, including providing public goods, defining and enforcing property rights, correcting externalities and regulating markets, maintaining and promoting competition in the market, protecting consumers rights, and redistributing income. It is essential for students to know basic differences between the three levels of government; they should understand the basic relationship between local, state and federal levels of government. Students need to be introduced to the concept of power sharing and economic relationships between the three levels of government through examples like highway construction or law enforcement. It is not essential for students to know specific names of persons working in the three levels of government or advanced knowledge of Federalism. Students do not need to understand the unique fiscal responsibilities of each level of government or the fiscal relationships between the different levels of government. Students also do not need to understand the historical evolution of Federalism or the early founders debate and resolution of a Federalist type system. Appropriate assessments require students to explain the way local and state governments contribute to the federal government; therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be to identify examples of the different and overlapping roles of the three different levels of government, highlighting the unique contributions of local and state governments in the federal system. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

14 Standard 2-4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the division of the world geographically into continents and politically into nation-states 2-4.1: Identify on a map the continents and the major nation-states of the world and distinguish between these two entities. (P, G) Taxonomy Level: A 1 Remembering /Factual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: This is the student s first introduction to the study of continents and nation-states. In sixth grade (6-3.1) students are required to explain feudalism and its relationship to the development of European nation states and monarchies, including feudal relationships, the daily lives of peasants and serfs, the economy under the feudal/manorial system, and the fact that feudalism helped monarchs centralize power. It is essential for students to know the difference between a continent and a nation-state. Students need to know the location of the seven continents and be able to locate major nations in relationship to the continents. It is not essential for students to know the history of nation-building. Students do not need to know the names of all the nations of the world or be able to describe geographic features of the continents. Appropriate assessment requires students to identify continents and nation-states on a map; therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be to recall this information using the appropriate materials. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

15 Standard 2-4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the division of the world geographically into continents and politically into nation-states 2-4.2: Summarize how nation-states interact with one another in order to conduct trade. (P, H, E, G) Taxonomy Level: B 2 Understanding /Conceptual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: This is the student s first experience with the idea of how nationstates interact through trade. Earlier in second grade (2-4.1) students identified on a map the continents and the major nation-states of the world and distinguished between these two entities. In sixth (6-3.1) students will explain feudalism and its relationship to the development of European nation states and monarchies, including feudal relationships, the daily lives of peasants and serfs, the economy under the feudal/manorial system, and the fact that feudalism helped monarchs centralize power. In seventh grade (7-1.3, 7-1.5) students will compare how European nations exercised political and economic influence differently in the Americas, including tradingpost empires, plantation colonies, and settler colonies. They will also summarize the characteristics of European colonial powers in Asia and their effects on the society and culture of Asia, including global trade patterns and the spread of various religions. It is essential for students to know the incentives that nation-states have to interact and engage in trade. Students must understand the motives (i.e. acquiring necessary goods and services) behind trading with other nations and how this forces nation-state interactions. It is also essential for students to understand how nations interact and engage in trade, i.e., transportation, communication, etc. It is not essential for students to know the theory of comparative advantage. Students do not need to understand the costs and benefits of trade or be able to identify who wins and loses in trading relationships. It is also not essential for students to understand details of a nation s trade flows or trade patterns. Appropriate assessment requires students to summarize the way nations interact with each other; therefore the primary focus of assessment should be to generalize the main motives of nationstate trade, descriptions of nation-state trading practices, and the effects of these practices on the relationships among trading partners. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

16 Standard 2-5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of trade and markets and the role of supply and demand in determining the price and allocation of goods within the community : Identify examples of markets and price in the local community and explain the roles of buyers and sellers in creating markets and pricing. (E) Taxonomy Level: A 2 Understanding /Factual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: In first grade (1-6.4) students were introduced to the roles of producers and consumers and the ways in which they are interdependent. In high school students will have a more-in-depth discussion of the nature and role of competition in a market economy, including the determination of market price through competition among buyers and sellers and the conditions that make industries more or less competitive, such as quality, quantity, and price of products (ECON2.2). It is essential for students to know the role of trade in market transactions. Students should have an understanding of both the definition of markets and examples of markets in the local community. Students must also recognize the role of buyers and sellers in determining the price and the amount of goods sold in the market. They must also understand the importance of buyers in determining the types of goods and services that are available in the market. It is not essential for students to know issues such as profit motive, the impact of shortages and surpluses, the determinants of supply and demand, or a graphical analysis of market forces. Appropriate assessment requires students to identify examples of markets and price in a local community; therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be to define and explain the role of markets and the role of trade in market transactions. In addition, an emphasis should be placed on identifying the role of buyers and sellers in the market place. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

17 Standard 2-5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of trade and markets and the role of supply and demand in determining the price and allocation of goods within the community : Summarize the concept of supply and demand and explain its effect on price. (E) Taxonomy Level: B 2 Understanding /Conceptual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: This is the first time that students will be introduced to the concepts of supply and demand. They will have discussions of this concept in more detail in high school where the focus will be on the determinants of supply, demand and price allocation (ECON 2.1) It is essential for students to know the definition of supply and demand. Students need to know why prices go up and down in their community market place. It is not essential for students to know factors that cause supply and demand curves to shift and issues relating to equilibrium price and quantity. The objective of this indicator is to summarize the concept of supply and demand; therefore the primary focus of assessment should be to generalize the main points in the description of these economic concepts and their effects on price and to generalize why prices change in the marketplace. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

18 Standard 2-5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of trade and markets and the role of supply and demand in determining the price and allocation of goods within the community : Recognize that people s choices about what they will buy will determine what goods and services are produced. (E) Taxonomy Level: A 1 Remember /Factual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: Students were introduced to making choices in first grade (1-6.1). They would have been introduced to supply and demand earlier (2.5.2) and will be exposed to the issues of scarcity, opportunity cost, and economic decision making in high school (ECON 1.1, 1.2, 1.3). It is essential for students to know: Students must understand the relationship between what people buy and what is produced by businesses. Students should understand the market concept of consumer sovereignty, or the consumer as king of the marketplace, and the impact of consumer choices on the final production of goods and services. Students should recognize the determinants, or factors, of demand that influence changes in consumer decisions to purchase goods and services. It is not essential for students to know: Students do not need to know the meaning of scarcity, opportunity cost, and the determinants of supply that would cause supply to change in the market. Students do not have to understand a graphical analysis of supply and demand or be able to illustrate changes in supply or demand. The objective of this indicator is to exemplify the impact of people s choices on market behavior; therefore, the primary focus of assessment should be to identify determinants of demand and explain how these changes impact the price and quantity sold in the market.. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

19 Standard 2-5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of trade and markets and the role of supply and demand in determining the price and allocation of goods within the community : Identify the relationships between trade and resources both within and among communities, including natural, human, and capital resources. (E) Taxonomy Level: B 2 Understanding /Conceptual Knowledge Previous/future knowledge: Students were introduced to how families and communities cooperate and compromise in order to meet their needs in first grade (1-6.3). They will have more in-depth knowledge of productive resources in high school (ECON 1.2, 1.3). It is essential for students to know: Students must understand the meaning of natural, human, and capital resources. They need to be able to identify examples of each concept and understand how these resources are used in the production of goods and services. Students must also understand the importance of productive resources in both trade and the final production of goods and services.. It is not essential for students to know: Students do not need understand the details of the circular flow model of economic activities. Students also do not need to know the importance of productive resources in international trade. One objective of this indicator is to identify the relationship between trade and resources both within and among communities therefore; the primary focus of assessment should be to differentiate between human, natural, and capital resources and to compare their uses in the final production of goods and services. Effective May 2008 Indicator / 1

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