Constitutional Principles (4).notebook. October 08, 2014

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1 Bell Ringers Mrs. Salasney Homework Objective: Students will describe the conflicts facing the governing of the new nation 2 Which action by the British government was considered by American colonists to be a violation of their rights as Englishmen? (1) making treaties with Native American Indians (2) protecting the colonies from foreign invasion (3) failing to enforce the Navigation Acts (4) taxing the colonies without representation in Parliament American colonists showed their opposition to the British taxation and trade restrictions of the 1760s primarily by (1) supporting the French against the British (2) boycotting products from Great Britain (3) overthrowing the royal governors in most of the colonies (4) purchasing additional products from Native American Indian tribes Essential Question: What are the weaknesses of the articles of confederation? Sep 25 10:03 PM Sep 29 8:30 PM 1 Which fundamental political idea is expressed in the eclaration of Independence? 2 The Virginia House of Burgesses was important to the development of democracy in the thirteen colonies because it A The government should guarantee every citizen economic security. B The central government and state governments should have equal power. C If the government denies its people certain basic rights, that government can be overthrown. Rulers derive their right to govern from God and are therefore bound to govern in the nation s best interest. A B C provided an example of a representative form of government created the first written constitution in America provided for direct election of senators began the practice of legislative override of executive vetoes Sep 28 12:53 PM Sep 28 12:56 PM 3... I challenge the warmest advocate [supporter] for reconciliation, to shew [show], a single advantage that this continent can reap [gain], by being connected with Great Britain. I repeat the challenge, not a single advantage is derived [acquired]. Our corn will fetch its price in any market in Europe, and our imported goods must be paid for, buy them where we will.... Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776 This speaker is most likely opposed to A B C mercantilism capitalism direct democracy representative government Republic a government where citizens rule through elected officials Republicanism governments should be based on the consent of the people Sep 28 1:00 PM Sep 28 12:15 AM 1

2 The Articles of Confederation Strengths set of laws proposed after the revolution 2 levels of government (state and national) shared fundamental powers gave the national government power to declare war, make peace, sign treaties, borrow money could not enforce the acts of congress Sep 25 10:12 PM Sep 24 1:03 PM Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation No executive or judicial branches Could not tax or raise armies Each state only had 1 vote regardless of population Lacked national unity 4 The Articles of Confederation are best described as a A statement of principles justifying the Revolutionary War B plan of union for the original thirteen states C set of arguments supporting ratification of the Constitution list of reasons for the secession of the Southern States Sep 25 10:13 PM Sep 28 9:48 PM Land Ordinance of 1785 A plan for surveying land west of the Appalachian mountains Made land affordable Wanted to establish farms and communities Sep 25 10:13 PM Sep 28 2:57 PM 2

3 Northwest Ordinance of 1787 A success of the A.O.C Three stages of statehood: > Congress appointed 3 judges and a governer to govern the territory > When population reached 5,000 adult male landowners, elect a territorial legislature > When population reached 60,000, elect delegates to a state constitutional convention Shay's Rebellion 1787 An uprising of debt ridden farmers protesting increased state taxes. Showed the weakness of the central government Sep 25 10:13 PM Sep 25 10:14 PM Bell Ringer 5 A of the inability of government under the Confederation to maintain public order. B C Many people were alarmed about Shays Rebellion, not so much because of the fear of insurrection but because: the rebellion was led by aniel Shays with the blessing and support of General George Washington of the tens of thousands of farmers who participated in the rebellion. the French sent troops to support the farmers participating in the rebellion. Objective: Students will be able to describe the results of the compromises made at the constitutional convention Essential Question: What were the historical circumstances that led to Federalism? Sep 28 2:46 PM Sep 25 10:15 PM 6 The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 was important because it The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 was important because it 1. ensured universal suffrage for all males 2. extended slavery north of the Ohio River 3. provided a process for admission of new states to the Union 4. established reservations for Native American Indians A 1. ensured universal suffrage for all males B 2. extended slavery north of the Ohio River C 3. provided a process for admission of new states to the Union 4. established reservations for Native American Indians Sep 28 12:24 AM Sep 29 8:48 PM 3

4 Constitutional Convention ebate In your groups answer the questions on the handouts and choose a spokesperson for each argument. Sep 25 10:35 PM Sep 28 3:45 PM Articles of Confederation vs. Constitution Strong central government vs. Strong states Great Compromise Large states vs. small states Sep 27 6:03 PM Sep 25 10:35 PM 3/5ths Compromise North vs. South Objective: Students will examine excerpts from the Federalist papers to exemplify the debates facing the framers of the constitution Essential Question: What is the main argument between the federalists and the anti federalists? Sep 28 12:30 AM Sep 28 3:23 PM 4

5 Federalist Strong Central Gov't Bill of Rights not needed. Gov't powers would be limited by the Constitution Checks & Balances Anti Federalist Weak central gov't so it would not threaten people rights or take the power of the states Add Bill of Rights to protect the people against abuses of power. Federalism new system of government where powers were divided between the state governments and the national government elegated powers national gov't Reserved powers state gov't Sep 25 10:35 PM Sep 28 12:30 AM Federalist Papers a series of essays defending the constitution and supporting ratification Federalist # 51 "Ambition must be made to counteract ambition...if men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary. In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself." James Madison The Federalist No. 51 Based on this quote, what is Madison's view of the relationship between human nature and good government? Sep 25 10:36 PM Sep 28 9:35 PM Bell Ringers (4) Senteos 7 What was an important accomplishment of the central government under the Articles of Confederation? A elimination of debts from the Revolutionary War B removal of all British troops from North America C formation of a national policy relating to Native American Indians Objective: Students will be able to list one power for each branch of government development of guidelines for the admission of new states into the Union Sep 25 10:28 PM Oct 5 10:46 PM 5

6 8 Which concept from the European Enlightenment was included in the United States Constitution? A absolutism 9 The United States Government is considered a federal system because A the people elect national officials B despotism C limited monarchy consent of the governed B both national and state governments exist within the nation C foreign policy is handled by state governments each state has equal representation in the United States Senate Oct 5 10:44 PM Oct 5 10:43 PM 10 At the Constitutional Convention of 1787, delegates from the small states most strongly supported the idea of A establishing a strong national executive B levying taxes on exports C popular election of Senators equal representation for the states in the national legislature Oct 5 10:41 PM Sep 28 2:32 PM Bell Ringer In complete sentences list one power for each branch of government Gmail Homework 2 COST documents due Thursday Objective: Students can connect the 3 branches of government to the Articles of the Constitution Mod 8 gmail subject: Mod 8 Apps gmail and google drive Oct 6 10:02 AM Oct 7 7:39 AM 6

7 Answer these questions based on the Constitution pg List 3 purposes of the Constitution (preamble) 2. Name the two houses described in article 1? (article 1) 3. How was representation determined in both houses? (article 1) 4. How old do you have to be to be a representative (article 1) 5. How old do you have to be to be a senator? (article 1) 6. What branch proposes bills that can become laws if approved? (article 1) 7. Who has the power in the executive branch of government (article 2) 8. What are the qualifications to be president? (article 2) 9. What does the president promise to defend? (article 2) 10. How does the president approve laws? (article 1) 11. Which branch is described by article 3 and how long do they serve? (article 3) Article 1 Article 2 Article 3 Make Laws Enforce Laws Review Laws Oct 5 11:02 PM Sep 28 3:13 PM Ratifying the Constitution Objective: students will define the Bill of Rights in their own words Essential Question: why did the Founding Fathers add a Bill of Rights to the Constitution? Sep 28 12:34 AM Oct 5 10:55 PM The Bill of Rights pg Right to assemble, freedom of the press, speech, petition and religion 2. Right to bear arms 3. Freedom from quartering troops 4. Freedom against unreasonable search and seizure 5. Rights of accused persons 6. Right to a speedy and public trial 7. Right to a trial by jury 8. Limits on fines and punishments 9. Rights of the people 10. Powers of the states and the people the first 10 Amendments of the Constitution Which Amendment intended to protect the people from the from the federal Bill of government Rights abusing its power protects the following right? Sep 28 12:35 AM Nov 24 12:24 PM 7

8 Bell Ringer You do NOT need your ipad Homework due tomorrow Objective: Students will be able to describe the difference between Checks and Balances and Separation of Powers Essential Question: What Enlightenment thinkers influenced the Constitution? Bell Ringer: With a partner define the following terms in 3 words or less Ratification Bicameral Amend Veto Override Levy Apportionment Sep 25 10:27 PM Oct 8 7:40 AM Checks and Balances: A system that keeps no one branch from becoming too powerful Pg. 143 in the textbook/ Internet Provide 2 3 examples of checks and balances Oct 8 7:47 AM Oct 5 11:21 PM Separation of Powers Each branch has its own powers and the powers do not overlap. Sep 25 10:31 PM Oct 5 11:12 PM 8

9 Montesquieu The 3 Branches of Government French Enlightenment philosopher Praised British government for separating the monarch and parliament power of the purse? chief diplomat? judicial review? Oct 5 11:12 PM Sep 28 12:30 AM A B C 11 To avoid having too much power concentrated in one branch of government, the framers of the Constitution established 1. a bicameral national legislature 2. division of power among different levels of government 3. the system of two political parties 4. the system of checks and balances Federalism Checks and Balances Judicial Review Separation of Power Popular Sovereignty Oct 5 11:15 PM Oct 1 1:30 PM Objective: Students will be able to give several examples of the unwritten Constitution Essential Question: What precedents did George Washington set? The system of checks and balances is best illustrated by the power of 1. the President to veto a bill passed by Congress 2. Congress to censure one of its members 3. a governor to send the National Guard to stop a riot 4. state and Federal governments to levy and collect taxes Objective: Students will be able to define elegated, Concurrent and Reserved Powers while giving an example of each. Essential Question: What examples can you give of the Unwritten Constitution? Sep 25 10:30 PM Oct 5 11:19 PM 9

10 Electoral College Marbury v. Madison Sep 28 12:35 AM Sep 25 10:36 PM The Elastic Clause Committees Sep 25 10:31 PM Sep 25 10:32 PM Filibuster Lobbying Sep 25 10:32 PM Sep 25 10:32 PM 10

11 The Constitution elegated Powers Army & Navy Coin money Regulate Trade Concurrent Power Enforce Laws Establish Courts Borrow Money Protect the Safety of the People Build Roads Collect Taxes Reserved Powers Conduct Elections Establish Schools Regulate Businesses within a state Establish local Gov't Regulate Marriages Sep 28 9:46 PM Sep 28 12:36 AM 11

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