Chapter 10 Section Review Packet

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1 Name: Date: Chapter 10 Section Review Packet Section 10-1: Laying the Foundations of Government 1. George Washington 2. Martha Washington 3. Electoral college 4. John Adams 5. New York City 6. Precedent 7. Alexander Hamilton 8. Thomas Jefferson 9. Cabinet 10. Judiciary Act of John Jay 12. Edmund Randolph a. First first lady of the United States b. First Vice-President of the United States c. First capital city of the United States d. Law which created a federal court system e. First Attorney General of the United States f. First Chief Justice of the Supreme Court g. First Secretary of the Treasury h. First Secretary of State i. Collective name given to the heads of various executive departments; President s close group of advisors j. An action that serves as an example to be followed in the future k. Group of people chosen by state legislatures whose job it is to officially select a President l. First President of the United States 13. List the various reasons why Americans thought George Washington was a good choice for the first President of the United States. 14. Explain how the electoral college works. 15. Describe the concerns of each of the following groups in the year 1790: farmers, merchants, and manufacturers. 16. Why did Washington say that his and the government s actions during his Presidency would be considered precedents? 17. How did Congress plan and set up the executive branch? What were some of the major departments created, and who headed these departments?

2 18. What act created the federal court system? How many levels of courts were there, and what type of court was on each level?

3 Section 10-2: Hamilton and National Finances 19. National debt 20. Bonds 21. Speculators 22. Protective tariff 23. Loose construction 24. Strict construction 25. Bank of the United States a. People who buy items at low prices in the hope that those items will rise in value b. The idea that if the Constitution doesn t specifically prohibit something, then it is allowed c. The idea that unless the Constitution specifically allows something, then it is prohibited d. Certificates that represent money owed; usually sold by the government to raise money e. A tax on imports meant to encourage people to buy domestic, rather than foreign, products f. Bank created by the US Government as a place to deposit the government s money and mint coins g. Total amount of money owed to creditors by the government of a country 26. Explain how Alexander Hamilton wanted to pay off the national debt. Include the following in your answer: money owed to foreign countries, money owed to US citizens, and the d) role of speculators. d) 27. Why did Hamilton want the federal government to assume, or take over, state debts? What compromise was made in order to convince some states, like those in the South, to agree to this? 28. What was the primary disagreement between Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson? 29. What is the purpose of a protective tariff? Who would the tariff help, and who would the tariff hurt?

4 30. What were the arguments for a national bank? B) What were some of the arguments against it? Include a discussion of loose versus strict construction in your answer.

5 Section 10-3: Troubles Ahead 31. French Revolution 32. Neutrality Proclamation 33. Edmond Genet 34. Privateers 35. Jay s Treaty 36. Thomas Pinckney 37. Right of Deposit 38. Pinckney s Treaty a. US Ambassador to Spain during Washington s Presidency b. French ambassador who angered George Washington with his demands c. Private ships hired or allowed by a country to attack its enemies d. Treaty negotiated between the US and Britain by Chief Justice John Jay e. Treaty negotiated between the US and Spain by Thomas Pinckney f. Popular democratic/republican revolution that began in 1789 g. Declaration by the United States that the country would not take sides with countries at war in Europe h. Allowed American ships to transfer good without paying fees on their cargo 39. What was the French Revolution and why did it occur? How did other countries like Great Britain respond to the Revolution? What was President Washington s response to the conflict? d) 40. Who was Citizen Genet and why did he come to the United States? How did Washington respond to his demands? How did then Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson respond to Washington s actions and why? 41. Explain Jay s Treaty and Pinckney s Treaty, and what was the result of these treaties in the United States?

6 Section 10-4: Challenges at Home 42. Little Turtle 43. Anthony Wayne 44. Battle of Fallen Timbers 45. Treaty of Greenville 46. Whiskey Rebellion a. Rebellion by farmers who opposed high taxes on their whiskey production b. General who led an army to defeat a confederation of native American tribes c. Battle in which Little Turtle and his allies were defeated by the United States d. Leader of a confederation of native American tribes on the frontier e. Treaty that ended the conflict between the United States and a confederation of native American tribes 47. Why did native Americans under the leadership of Little Turtle go to war with the United States? 48. Who was sent to fight Little Turtle? What major battle took place and what was its result? What treaty ended the conflict and what were its terms? 49. What was the Whiskey Rebellion? How did President Washington respond? 50. a- What were three key messages (warnings) in President Washington s famous farewell speech?

7 Section 10-5: John Adams Presidency 51. Political parties 52. Federalist Party 53. Democratic-Republican Party 54. XYZ Affair 55. Alien and Sedition Acts 56. Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions 57. USS Constitution th Amendment a. Acts that allowed the deportation of foreigners that were a threat to the United States and allowed the arrest of those critical of the government b. Party name chosen by the anti-federalists c. Political party that believed in a strong central government d. Political statements passed by two state legislatures declaring the Alien and Sedition Acts unconstitutional e. Scandal in which 3 French agents demanded payment in order for the United States to even negotiate with France f. Oldest commissioned warship in the US Navy; named for its thick oak hull g. Groups that help elect government officials and shape government policies h. Amendment to the Constitution that placed the vote for vice-president on a separate ballot than that of the President 59. What were the goals of the Federalist Party? Who was their primary candidate in the election of 1796? 60. What were the goals of the Democratic-Republican Party? Who was their primary candidate in the election of 1796? 61. What was the XYZ Affair? How did the American people react to this scandal? 62. How did President Adams respond to the threat of war with France? 63. In order to protect the country from traitors, Congress passed what acts? What did these acts allow the government to do?

8 64. What resolutions were passed by the state legislatures of two Southern states and why? What two men were primarily responsible for these resolutions? What was the purpose of these acts? 65. Who won the election of 1800? Why was the election controversial and what did it lead to?

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