Clay County Civics Review

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Clay County Civics Review"

Transcription

1 Clay County Civics Review Units 4 and 5: The Legislative and Executive Branches C3.4, C3.8, C4.1, C4.2, C4.3 Review content provided by Florida Joint Center for Citizenship Review tasks created by Kelly Watt, unless otherwise indicated Last Updated November 2014

2 Clay County Civics Review Packet: Important Notes and Directions Important Notes: 1. Limitations: This packet was created as a self-paced review tool for 8 th graders enrolled in M/J United States History & Civics in preparation of the state-mandated Civics EOC. This packet will never replace the value of daily teacher instruction. Because it is designed to be completed independently of regular class instruction, success with this material is heavily dependent upon student effort. Students are encouraged to seek the assistance of their social studies teacher throughout the process. Additional resources, including videos for every benchmark, can be found on Escambia County Schools EOC review site: 2. Organization The civics curriculum is comprised of 35 tested benchmarks. A benchmark identifies what a student should know and be able to do. Every benchmark contains benchmark clarifications (BC) which indicate how achievement of that benchmark must be demonstrated. In this packet, students have a set of notes providing background information on every benchmark clarification, courtesy of Florida Joint Center for Citizenship. For each BC, they also have a learning activity. Following completion of the BC tasks, students use what they ve learned to complete a single benchmark task. Directions: Note: These are standardized directions. Teachers can modify this fit each individual student s needs. Students should be aware of their teacher s expectations for each unit. 1. Review what the benchmark is asking you to know and be able to do. 2. Review the tasks associated with each benchmark clarification (BC). 3. Conduct a close read of the first set of notes with BC1. 4. On a separate sheet of paper (unless otherwise indicated), create your written response to the task associated with BC1. Take time to create a quality response, explaining all of your answers with details from the notes. 5. Repeat steps 2-4 with the remaining BC tasks. 6. Read and complete the benchmark task at the bottom of the page. Your response to these questions should be a minimum of 7 sentences long. 7. Turn in entire packet plus written work to your teacher with your name at the top. **You are encouraged to seek the assistance of your teacher if you have any questions.

3 C3.4: Identify the relationship and division of powers between the federal government and state government. Benchmark Clarification BC1 BC2 BC3 BC4 Task Draw a Venn diagram showing what federalism means. Use the following terms on your Venn diagram: Federalism, Enumerated Powers, Reserved Powers, Concurrent Powers, State, Federal Explain how federalism addressed each of the two issues from the Articles of Confederation Explain what KIND of powers are given to the federal government? (Don t just list them. Instead think about how federal powers are different from state powers. Why give the federal government those powers and not the state governments?) 1.) In your own words, what does the 10 th amendment say? 2.) Does this mean that state governments can do whatever they want? Explain your answer with reasons listed in the notes. Benchmark Task: Read the passage below and answer the question below. Before the U.S. Constitution, the United States had the Articles of Confederation and was organized with a confederal system. A confederal system is a system of government where power is held by independent states and there is little power in the federal (national) government. The U.S. Constitution was written because of concerns about the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation. The federal government had very little power and the states acted as independent nations with too much power. Government power was unbalanced and there was no sense of national unity. To solve these problems, the U.S. Constitution was written and the United States moved from a confederal system to a system of federalism. The Founding Fathers had a big goal. They needed to limit state power because states had too much power under the Articles of Confederation. They also needed to create a federal government with limited power. As a solution, the Founding Fathers created a system of federalism. This means that power is shared between the federal, state, and local governments. The federal government has its own powers, shares some powers with the states, and gives states some of their own powers. By dividing power between different levels, this limits the power of each level of government and one level of government cannot become too powerful. How does federalism limit government power? Highlight the relevant passages in the text that helped you answer this question, and then answer the question. 1

4 SS.7.C.3.4 Identify the relationship and division of power between the federal and state governments. SS.7.C.3.4 Benchmark Clarification 1: Students will define the system of federalism. Federalism is a system of government where power is shared between the central government and the states. Under the Articles of Confederation, a confederal system of government existed which means that there was no central government. This system proved to be weak and ineffective and a new constitution was written. The United States Constitution was created around the principle of federalism the idea that power is shared between the national, state and local governments. Federalism corrected the problems under the Articles of Confederation, all while maintaining a balance between central and state powers. According to the Constitution, powers are set aside specifically for the national government (enumerated power, also known as delegated powers), for state governments only (reserved powers) or for both (concurrent powers). concurrent powers - powers shared by the national, state, and/or local government confederal system - a system of government where power is located with the independent states and there is little power in the central government enumerated or delegated powers - the powers specifically named and assigned to the federal government or prohibited to be exercised by the states under the U.S. Constitution federalism - a system of government in which power is divided and shared between national, state, and local government reserved powers - powers that are not granted to the federal government that belong to (are reserved to) the states and the people 2

5 SS.7.C.3.4 Identify the relationship and division of power between the federal and state governments. SS.7.C.3.4 Benchmark Clarification 2: Students will analyze how federalism limits government power. The U.S. Constitution was written in response to concerns about the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation. The two major weaknesses are: 1. The national government had very little power. There was a national Congress that did not have the power to tax the people or to raise its own army or navy. 2. Because there was no national government, the states could act as if they were independent nations. This meant that the states could have independent relationships with other countries (such as making treaties or trade agreements), and they also found themselves in arguments with other states at times (such as over the use of rivers or lakes that bordered more than one state). Together, the Articles of Confederation did not encourage national unity (togetherness) or a sense of nationhood among the states. The U.S. Constitution, as it was written, reflected the problems under the Articles of Confederation, and the Founding Fathers wanted to solve these problems. The founders had a big goal: they needed to limit state power (because the states had independent power under the Articles of Confederation) all while creating a limited, national government. They needed to create a system of federalism, where the new government created opportunities for states to enjoy unique powers and to share others with the newly formed national government. For example, only the national government has the power to raise and support armies (enumerated/delegated powers), while it is up to the states to decide whether or not citizens must be registered in order to vote on Election Day (reserved). Both the state and national governments have the power to tax (concurrent); some states tax incomes (New York) while others do not (Florida) (reserved). The Constitution provides limitations on government power under the system of federalism that it creates. Articles of Confederation - the first constitution of the United States concurrent powers - powers shared by the national, state, and/or local government enumerated or delegated powers - the powers specifically named and assigned to the federal government or prohibited to be exercised by the states under the U.S. Constitution federalism - a system of government in which power is divided and shared between national, state, and local government reserved powers - powers that are not granted to the federal government that belong to (are reserved to) the states and the people 3

6 SS.7.C.3.4 Identify the relationship and division of power between the federal and state governments. SS.7.C.3.4 Benchmark Clarification 3: Students will compare concurrent powers, enumerated powers, reserved powers, and delegated powers as they relate to state and federal government. Types of Powers Concurrent Powers Enumerated Powers Reserved Powers Definitions Concurrent powers are powers that are shared by the national and state governments. Examples of shared powers are: 1. The power to levy taxes (tax the people). 2. The ability to borrow money. Enumerated (delegated) powers are powers that are specifically listed in the Constitution for the national government. Examples of powers granted to the national government are: 1. The power to raise and support an army and navy. 2. The power to coin money. 3. The power to declare war. Reserved powers are powers that are given to the states by the Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which states that any power not specifically granted to the national government is reserved to the states. Examples of powers that belong to the states: 1. The power to run elections. 2. The power to establish schools. Delegated Powers Delegated (Enumerated) powers are powers that are specifically listed in the Constitution for the national government. Additional examples of power granted to the national government are: 1. The power to regulate trade and commerce. 2. The power to establish rules for naturalization. 3. The power to declare war. 4

7 SS.7.C.3.4 Identify the relationship and division of power between the federal and state governments. SS.7.C.3.4 Benchmark Clarification 4: Students will analyze the issues related to the Tenth Amendment. The Tenth Amendment to the Constitution was added as the last Amendment in the Bill of Rights. The Tenth Amendment says The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited to it by the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. Because the writers of the Constitution were concerned about giving too much power to the national government, they decided to list out the specific powers for Congress (enumerated/delegated). When the necessary and proper clause was added to the Constitution it was so broad that it allowed Congress to have so many powers that listing them seemed pointless. In addition, the Tenth Amendment does not list any individual powers. Instead it just broadly says that powers are reserved to the States and to the people leaving the meaning of reserved powers wide open to the states. Even though the Tenth Amendment extends unenumerated powers to the states and to the people, the state legislatures may not create laws or take actions that violate the Constitution because of the supremacy clause. The supremacy clause states that the Constitution is the Supreme Law of the Land. If a state law goes against the Constitution, that law is struck down making the Constitution supreme over all state laws. Bill of Rights - the first ten amendments of the U.S.Constitution enumerated or delegated powers - the powers specifically named and assigned to the federal government or prohibited to be exercised by the states under the U.S. Constitution necessary and proper clause - the power of Congress to make laws that they need to carry out their enumerated powers reserved powers - powers that are not granted to the federal government that belong to (are reserved to) the states and the people, see Tenth Amendment supremacy clause - the clause that states that the U.S. Constitution is the supreme law of the land, and that national laws are supreme over state laws Tenth Amendment - the final amendment in the Bill of Rights, it states: The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. 5

8 C3.8/C3.9: Analyze the structure, functions, and processes of the legislative, executive and judicial branches. Government AND illustrate the law-making process at the state, federal and local levels. Benchmark Clarification BC1 Task Complete a chart that looks like this: Branch Legislative Executive Judicial Structure (who runs this branch?) Powers Role in making laws BC2 Who are your local, state and federal lawmakers? Research and find the names of your Clay County Commissioners, state legislators, and Florida s US Representatives and US Senators BC3 How are ordinances, statutes and acts similar? How are they different? BC4 How is the law-making process similar in state and federal governments? Explain at least three similarities. Extra Practice: I m Just a Bill video Three Branches of Power game Three Branches - webquest Benchmark Task: See next page Based on what you have learned, why do you think the process of a bill becoming a law at the federal level has many steps? Cite evidence from the notes and any other source you used. 6

9 SS.7.C.3.8 Analyze the structure, function and processes of the legislative, executive and judicial branches. Also Assesses SS.7.C Illustrate the lawmaking process at the local, state, and federal levels. SS.7.C.3.8 Benchmark Clarification 1: Students will examine the processes of the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government. The United States government is made of up of three separate branches: the legislative, the executive, and the judicial. Each branch is organized very differently, has different jobs and responsibilities and has its own unique set of powers. The Legislative Branch The legislative branch includes the House of Representatives and the Senate together they are the lawmaking body of the United States called Congress. Article I of the Constitution discusses the powers and organization of Congress. The main job of Congressmen/Congresswomen is to make laws. The legislative branch is responsible for making laws. At the federal level, the process of how a bill becomes a law can be difficult. Each bill begins as an idea. An idea for a law can come from U.S. Representatives, Senators, the president, or even ordinary citizens. An idea suggested in Congress to be a law is called a bill. Bills can be proposed in either chamber (house) of Congress (the House of Representatives or the Senate). Depending on which chamber of Congress proposes the bill, it will be assigned to an appropriate committee. The committee in Congress that the bill is assigned to will research more information related to the bill. There are several different types of committees each with their own set of responsibilities. Every member of Congress serves on one or more committees. After the committee completes its research and discusses the bill, the committee decides if the bill should move forward in the next step in becoming a law. If the committee agrees to move the bill forward, the bill moves to the full house of Congress where the bill was first introduced so that it can be debated and then voted on. If that chamber of Congress votes to keep the bill (for example, the U.S. House of Representatives) it then moves to the other chamber of Congress (for example, the U.S. Senate) for more debate and discussion. Finally, the other chamber of Congress will vote on the bill. If members of that chamber vote to keep the bill, the president will then be asked to sign the bill. If there are more than 10 days remaining in the congressional session, the president may take one of three actions. The president may choose to sign the bill into law, the president may choose to veto (reject) the bill or the president may choose to take no action on the bill. A bill becomes law if the president takes no action on the bill and there are at least 10 days remaining in the congressional session. If fewer than 10 days remain in a congressional session when the president is presented with a bill to sign, the president may take no action on the bill and the bill is vetoed. Bills on which the president takes no action when less than 10 days remain in the congressional session are called pocket vetoes. 7 1

10 The Executive Branch The second branch of the United States government is the executive branch. The executive branch includes the President and Vice President. The main job of the executive branch is to enforce the laws. Article II of the Constitution discusses the powers of the president. The president serves as chief executive of the nation enforcing the laws that Congress makes. If the president does not agree with a particular law that Congress has proposed (a bill), the Constitution gives the president the power to veto the bill. This is an important part of the system of checks and balances that guarantees that no one branch of government abuses its power. As well, the president has the power to issue executive orders, which are decisions that have the force of law. Executive orders do not have to be approved by Congress although the U.S. Supreme Court may find them to be unconstitutional and strike them down. For example, an executive order signed by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1942 allowed for the forced internment of U.S. citizens of Japanese descent during World War II. Additionally, the president has the power to nominate people to serve in different government positions. These are known as presidential appointments. Examples of presidential appointments include the president s cabinet, justices to the U.S. Supreme Court and ambassadors to different countries. As a part of the checks and balances system, the presidential appointments must be approved and confirmed by the Senate in order for them to take effect. This prevents the president from nominating or appointing people to these very important positions who may have been appointed for the wrong reason and may lack qualifications. The Judicial Branch The third branch is the judicial branch. The judicial branch includes the Supreme Court, federal courts and the state courts. Article III of the Constitution outlines the U.S. court structure. The U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the nation. In most cases, the Supreme Court has appellate jurisdiction, which means it has the power to review cases that have already been decided in lower courts. Sometimes the U.S. Supreme court has original jurisdiction, which means the Court has the power to hear a case first. For example, cases involving disagreements between two states would be first heard by the U.S. Supreme Court. There are thousands of appeals requests for cases to be heard by the Supreme Court each year although less than 100 are likely to be accepted. Once the Supreme Court reviews an appeal, the Court decides whether or not to hear the case. The Court will issue a writ of certiorari if the Court decides to accept the case on appeal. Because most cases that are accepted by the Supreme Court on appeal deal with constitutional questions, the Supreme Court has claimed the power of judicial review. Judicial review is the Court s power to determine whether or not a law or action is constitutional. This 8 2

11 power was not originally granted to the Supreme Court by the US Constitution. Instead, the Court interpreted the Constitution to mean that it does have this power in the Marbury v. Madison case (see SS.7.C.3.12). Courts use different processes to conduct their work. For example, courts issue court orders, documents requiring that someone do or not do something such as appear in court. Sometimes, the two parties involved in a civil suit may wish to speed up the court process by requesting a summary judgment. A summary judgment is a decision made on the basis of statements and evidence presented for the record without a trial. ambassador - a person sent as the chief representative of his or her own government in another country appellate jurisdiction - the power to hear appeals of cases which have been tried in lower courts bill - an idea being suggested to become a law cabinet - persons appointed by a head of state to head executive departments of government and act as official advisers checks and balances - a principle of the federal government, according to the U.S. Constitution, that allows each branch of government to limit the power of the other branches citizen - a legal member of a state and/or country committee - a group of House or Senate (or both) members gathered to discuss and debate proposed legislation and issues on specific topics Congress - the national legislative body of the U.S., consisting of the Senate, or upper house, and the House of Representatives, or lower house Congressman/Congresswoman - a member of the U.S. Congress, typically used to address members of the U.S. House of Representatives court order - a formal statement from a court that orders someone to do or stop doing something executive branch - the branch of government that enforces the laws made by the legislative branch executive order - an order that comes from the U.S. President or a government agency and must be obeyed like a law federal courts - courts that decide arguments over how to interpret the Constitution, all laws passed by Congress, arguments involving states, and in agreements with other nations., the U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the land and is at the top of the federal courts forced internment - the confinement of a group of people, especially during a war judicial branch - the branch of government that interprets the laws made by the legislative branch judicial review - the power of the U.S. courts to examine the laws or actions of the legislative and executive branches of the government and to determine whether such actions are consistent with the U.S. Constitution justice - the title given to judges of the U.S. Supreme Court legislative branch - the branch of government that creates laws Marbury v. Madison - U.S. Supreme Court case that established judicial review original jurisdiction - the power of a court to be the first to hear a case on a specific topic; for the U.S. Supreme Court this involves cases involving conflicts between Congress and the president and in cases in which a state is a party president - the head of the executive branch presidential appointments - the power of the U.S. President to choose members of his or her cabinet, ambassadors to other nations, and other officials in his or her administration state courts - courts that deal with issues of law relating to those matters that the U.S. Constitution did not give to the federal government and are outlined in a state s constitution summary judgment - a judgment decided by a trial court without that case going to trial; a summary judgment is an attempt to stop a case from going to trial unconstitutional - not in agreement with the U.S Constitution U.S. House of Representatives - the lower house of the U.S. Congress U.S. Representative - a member of the U.S House of Representatives; representatives are elected in districts throughout each state U.S. Senate - the upper house of the U.S. Congress U.S. Senator - a member of the U.S. Senate elected to represent an entire state, there are two senators per state U.S. Supreme Court - the highest court of the United States; it sits at the top of the federal court system veto - a decision by an executive authority such as a president or governor to reject a proposed law or statue World War II - a war that began on July7, 1937 in Asia and September 1, 1939 in Europe and lasted until 1945; it involved most of the world s countries writ of certiorari - the procedure to see if the U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case; a writ of certiorari is issues when a higher level court agrees to hear an appeal of an inferior court s decision 9 3

12 SS.7.C.3.8 Analyze the structure, function and processes of the legislative, executive and judicial branches. Also Assesses SS.7.C Illustrate the lawmaking process at the local, state, and federal levels. SS.7.C.3.8 Benchmark Clarification 2: Students will compare local, state, and federal lawmakers. The U.S. federal system allows both the national and state governments to share certain powers and responsibilities. Lawmaking is a power that is shared at each level of government the local, state, and federal levels. At the local level, depending on how the local government is organized, lawmakers could be city commissioners, city council members, county commissioners, or mayors. The number of commissioners and/or council members will vary depending on how the city or county government is organized. These local government officials pass ordinances that govern the people who live in villages, towns, cities and counties. State government is organized like the federal government. There is a state house of representatives and state senate made up of state representatives and state senators called state legislators. State representatives are elected to serve two-year terms and state senators are elected to serve four-year terms. State legislators work to create state laws, called statutes, which govern the people who live in the state. At the federal level, each state is given a certain number of U.S. Representatives based on the state s population and two U.S. Senators. U.S. Representatives serve two-year terms and have no term limits. U.S. Senators serve six-year terms and have no term limits. Together, U.S. Representatives and U.S. Senators make up the Congress. Congress enacts federal laws, called acts, which govern the people of the entire nation. act - legislation which has passed both houses of Congress in identical form, been signed into law by the president, or passed over his veto, therefore becoming law city commissioners/councilmembers - a member of the governing body of a city county commissioners - a member of the governing body of a county federal - a system of government where power is shared between a central government and states mayor - the head of government for a city, town or other municipality ordinance - a law enacted by a city or county affecting local affairs such as traffic, noise, and animal control state legislator - a member of the Florida House of Representatives (state representative) or Florida Senate (state senator) state representative - a member of a state legislature (i.e. the Florida House of Representatives) state senator - a member of a state legislature (i.e. the Florida Senate) statute - a law enacted at the state level U.S. Representative - a member of the U.S House of Representatives; representatives are elected in districts throughout each state U.S. Senator - a member of the U.S. Senate elected to represent an entire state, there are two senators per state 10

13 SS.7.C.3.8 Analyze the structure, function and processes of the legislative, executive and judicial branches. Also Assesses SS.7.C Illustrate the lawmaking process at the local, state, and federal levels. SS.7.C.3.8 Benchmark Clarification 3: Students will distinguish among ordinances, statutes and acts at the local, state and federal levels. Local governments pass laws that govern the people living in their villages, towns, cities, or counties. Local laws are called ordinances. State governments are required to make laws that govern the people that living in the state. State laws are called statutes. The federal government is required to make laws that govern the citizens and people within the United States. Federal laws are called acts. act - legislation which has passed both houses of Congress in identical form, been signed into law by the president, or passed over his veto, therefore becoming law ordinance - a law enacted by a city or county affecting local affairs such as traffic, noise, and animal control statute - a law enacted at the state level 11

14 SS.7.C.3.8 Analyze the structure, function and processes of the legislative, executive and judicial branches. Also Assesses SS.7.C Illustrate the lawmaking process at the local, state, and federal levels. SS.7.C.3.8 Benchmark Clarification 4: Students will compare and contrast the lawmaking process at the local, state, and federal levels. Lawmaking at the Local Level It is the job of local governments to make communities better places to live. To accomplish this job, local lawmaking bodies have the power to pass ordinances. Ordinances are regulations that govern a local community. Ordinances may not conflict with state laws, called statutes or federal laws, called acts. Local law enforcement groups (like the police force or Sherriff s deputies) are in charge of enforcing both ordinances and state statutes. Lawmaking at the State Level At the state level, the process of how a bill becomes a law can be difficult. Each bill begins as an idea. An idea for a law can come from state legislators, the governor, or even ordinary citizens. An idea once proposed in the state legislature is called a bill. Bills can be proposed in either the state house of representatives or the state senate. The house or senate committee that the bill is assigned to will research more information related to the bill. There are several different types of committees each with their own set of responsibilities. Every state legislator serves on one or more committees. After the committee completes its research and discusses the bill, the committee decides if the bill should move forward. If the committee agrees to move the bill forward, the bill moves to the full house of Congress where the bill was first introduced for debate and vote. If that legislative chamber votes to keep the bill (for example, the state house of representatives) it then moves to the other legislative chamber (for example, the state senate) for more debate and discussion. Finally, the other legislative chamber will vote on the bill. If members of that chamber vote to keep the bill, the governor will then be asked to sign the bill into law. State legislatures have various committees similar to the federal Congress. The committees study bills, hold hearings, and revise bills if necessary. Both state houses (the House of Representatives and the Senate) must approve a bill and the governor must sign it before it becomes law. Lawmaking at the Federal Level At the federal level, the process of how a bill becomes a law can be difficult. Each bill begins as an idea. An idea for a law can come from U.S. Representatives, Senators, the president, or even ordinary citizens. 12 1

15 Once an idea is proposed in Congress, it is called a bill. Bills can be proposed in either chamber (house) of Congress (the House of Representatives or the Senate). Depending on which chamber of Congress proposes the bill, it will be assigned to an appropriate committee. The committee in Congress to which the bill is assigned will research more information related to the bill. There are several different types of committees each with their own set of responsibilities. Every member of Congress serves on one or more committees. After the committee completes its research and discusses the bill, the committee decides if the bill should move forward. If the committee agrees to move the bill forward, the bill moves to the full house of Congress where the bill was first introduced for debate and vote. If that chamber of Congress votes to keep the bill (for example, the U.S. House of Representatives) it then moves to the other chamber of Congress (for example, the U.S. Senate) for more debate and discussion. Finally, the other chamber of Congress will vote on the bill. If members of that chamber vote to keep the bill, the president will then be asked to sign the bill. If there are more than 10 days remaining in the congressional session, the president may take one of three actions. The president may choose to sign the bill into law, the president may choose to veto (reject) the bill or the president may choose to take no action on the bill. A bill becomes law if the president takes no action on the bill and there are at least 10 days remaining in the congressional session. If fewer than 10 days remain in a congressional session when the president is presented with a bill to sign, the president may take no action on the bill and the bill is vetoed. Bills on which the president takes no action when less than 10 days remain in the congressional session are called pocket vetoes. act - legislation which has passed both houses of Congress in identical form, been signed into law by the president, or passed over his veto, therefore becoming law bill - an idea being suggested to become a law citizen - a legal member of a state and/or country committee - a group of legislators gathered to discuss and debate proposed legislation and issues on specific topics governor - the head of a state government ordinance - a law enacted by a city or county affecting local affairs such as traffic, noise, and animal control president - the head of the executive branch state house of representatives - the lower house of a state legislature (i.e., Florida House of Representatives) state legislator - a member of the Florida House of Representatives (state representative) or Florida Senate (state senator) state senate - the upper house of a state legislature (i.e., Florida Senate) statute - a law enacted at the state level U.S. Congress - the national legislative body of the U.S., consisting of the Senate, or upper house, and the House of Representatives, or lower house U.S. House of Representatives - the lower house of the U.S. Congress U.S. Representative - a member of the U.S House of Representatives; representatives are elected in districts throughout each state U.S. Senate - the upper house of the U.S. Congress U.S. Senator - a member of the U.S. Senate elected to represent an entire state, there are two senators per state veto - a decision by an executive authority such as a president or governor to reject a proposed law or statute 13 2

16 C4.1: Differentiate concepts related to US domestic and foreign policy. Benchmark Clarification BC1 BC2 BC3 Task Draw pictures of two issues that are considered DOMESTIC and two issues that are considered FOREIGN. Label each one. Look through the newspaper, either in print or online. Find three examples of recent foreign policy issues/decisions and three examples of recent domestic policy issues/decisions. Benchmark Task: Source: National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) / Copyright 1987 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All rights reserved. 1. What is going on in this cartoon? 2. What is the issue on which it is focusing? How do you know? 3. What is the relationship between foreign and domestic policy, according to this cartoon? BC4 Which TWO of the five foreign policy goals do you think are most important? Why? BC5 After reading the notes on the Secretary of State, what are three things you think they should do every day if they are to be successful in meeting our foreign policy goals? Extra Practice: Department of State Explain the goals of U.S. foreign policy and the role of the State Department in foreign policy. 14

17 SS.7.C.4.1 Differentiate concepts related to U.S. domestic and foreign policy. SS.7.C.4.1 Benchmark Clarification 1: Students will recognize the difference between domestic and foreign policy. The U.S. Constitution lists several powers for Congress that deal specifically with foreign and domestic policy. Foreign policy is the nation s overall plan for dealing with other nations. Domestic policy is the nation s plan for making laws and policies that impact citizen and non-citizen behavior in the United States. There are several different areas that the U.S. government focuses on when it comes to developing domestic policy. The U.S. government focuses on social programs, health care, and education when developing its domestic policy. The U.S. government also has to think about several areas when developing its foreign policy plan. The government has to create a plan for diplomacy, which is ways to maintain relationships with other nations. The government needs to consider which countries to join in an alliance with, which is making military or defensive union with other nations. Finally, the government also considers making treaties, or formal agreements, with other nations for the purposes of trade, defense, and other reasons. alliance - a union between nations for assistance and protection diplomacy - the work of keeping up relations between the governments of different countries domestic policy - a course of action chosen to guide people in making decisions about their own country foreign policy - a course of action chosen in order to guide people in making decisions about other countries treaty - an agreement or arrangement between two or more countries 15

18 SS.7.C.4.1 Differentiate concepts related to U.S. domestic and foreign policy. SS.7.C.4.1 Benchmark Clarification 2: Students will identify issues that relate to U.S. domestic and foreign policy. There are many different areas that the U.S. government focuses on when it comes to developing domestic policy. Some examples of domestic policy issues are social welfare, health care and education. The U.S. government creates laws and policies related to social welfare, which is when the government provides economic assistance to those in need. The government has designed economic programs for mothers with children, people who are unemployed and people who are disabled. The Social Security program, for example, was enacted in 1936 to help the elderly by providing them with a monthly income during retirement. As well, the government is concerned with providing needed medical care. Medicare was enacted to help pay for the medical care and medicines that elderly people need and often cannot afford. Medicaid was enacted to help pay for medical care and medicines that poor people need and often cannot afford. Finally, the federal government focuses on improving education as part of its domestic policy plan. The government provides teaching and learning resources to students from nursery school age through high school and college. One example of a policy related to education was the addition of the No Child Left Behind Act, which changed education standards and created new tests to measure student achievement. On the other hand, the federal government is also concerned about foreign affairs, or dealings with other nations. The federal government s foreign policy plan addresses how the government plans to interact with nations around the world. The president and the Secretary of State are the nation s primary foreign policy agents. There are general goals that the president and the Secretary of State keep in mind when developing the nation s foreign policy plan. These goals include: (1) national security (keeping the United States safe especially at its borders), (2) promoting peace (creating diplomatic relationships and allies (friendships/protection) with other nations), (3) spreading democracy (teaching other nations about the benefits of democratic governments), (4) promoting international trade (expanding the number of goods sold to other countries and good purchased from other countries) and (5) providing foreign aid (providing military, economic health and other types of assistance to other countries that are in need). One example of foreign aid was the aid offered after the United States signed the Marshall Plan, which was a plan to rebuild war-torn Europe after World War II. The U.S. government has to think about several areas when creating its foreign policy plan. The government has to create a plan for diplomacy, which is ways to establish and maintain relationships with other nations. Ambassadors and diplomats, including the Secretary of State, establish good working relationships with other nations. 16 1

19 As well, the government needs to consider which countries with which to join in an alliance. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is one example of a military alliance between several countries, and the United States is a member. By joining with another nation in a military or economic agreement, the United States considers that nation to be an allied nation. The government also considers making treaties, or formal agreements, with the leaders of other nations for the purposes of trade, defense, security and other goals. All of these international relations (dealings with other countries) create better working relationships with nations around the world. alliance - a union between nations for assistance and protection ambassador - a person sent as the chief representative of his or her own government in another country diplomacy - the work of keeping up relations between the governments of different countries domestic policy - a course of action chosen to guide people in making decisions about their own country federal government - the organization through which political authority is exercised at the national level, government of the United States foreign policy - a course of action chosen in order to guide people in making decisions about other countries international relations - relationship between nations around the world North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) - group of 28 countries that has agreed to protect each other in case of attack; founded in 1949 Secretary of State - the head of the U.S. Department of State; a member of the President s Cabinet treaty - an agreement or arrangement between two or more countries 17 2

20 SS.7.C.4.1 Differentiate concepts related to U.S. domestic and foreign policy. SS.7.C.4.1 Benchmark Clarification 3: Students will analyze the domestic implications of U.S. domestic and foreign policy. It is often the case that what is going on in other places in the world affects domestic policy in the United States. The U.S. government may increase its military spending, and spend less on domestic programs, if there are conflicts happening between nations or threats of attack against the United States that may threaten the safety of Americans or U.S. allies. For example, in the 1990s many communist nations fell (except Cuba and China) which allowed for less military spending and more domestic spending in the United States. This is one example of how global events changed policies and actions inside the United States. domestic policy - a course of action chosen to guide people in making decisions about their own country 18

21 SS.7.C.4.1 Differentiate concepts related to U.S. domestic and foreign policy. SS.7.C.4.1 Benchmark Clarification 4: Students will identify the goals and objectives of U.S. domestic and foreign policy. There are very clear goals that the United States has when it comes to developing domestic and foreign policy plans. Domestic policy is any set of laws or actions that are related to government programs that impact the citizens and people within the borders of the United States. Domestic policy covers a wide range of areas, from education, to the economy, taxes, social welfare and health care. The main goal of any domestic policy plan is to make laws and rules that benefit and protect the citizens and people within U.S. borders. Foreign policy is a nation s overall plan for dealing with other nations. There are some general goals to foreign policy plans in the United States which include: (1) national security (keeping U.S. borders safe), (2) promoting peace (creating diplomatic relationships and allies (friendships/protection) with countries around the world), (3) spreading democracy (teaching other nations about the benefits of democratic government), (4) promoting international trade (expanding the number of goods sold to other countries and good purchased from other countries) and finally (5) providing foreign aid (providing military, economic health and other assistance to other countries that are in need). allies - nations united with another for some common purpose such as assistance and protection diplomacy - the work of keeping up relations between the governments of different countries domestic policy - a course of action chosen to guide people in making decisions about their own country foreign policy - a course of action chosen in order to guide people in making decisions about other countries 19

22 SS.7.C.4.1 Differentiate concepts related to U.S. domestic and foreign policy. SS.7.C.4.1 Benchmark Clarification 5: Students will recognize the role of the U.S. State Department in foreign affairs. As part of the president s Cabinet, the U.S. State Department has an important role in guiding and carrying out of the nation s foreign policy plan. The Secretary of State is responsible for meeting with and offering suggestions to the president, visiting other nations, holding meetings with foreign leaders and government officials, and keeping the United States safe. By visiting and meeting with leaders of other nations, the Secretary of State learns more about these countries and reports back to the president with important information that will help the president and Congress create a foreign policy plan based on safety and the creation of good relationships. Cabinet - persons appointed by a head of state to head executive departments of government and act as official advisers foreign policy - a course of action chosen in order to guide people in making decisions about other countries Secretary of State - the head of the U.S. Department of State; a member of the President s Cabinet U.S. State Department - the federal department in the U. S. that sets and maintains foreign policies; part of the executive branch of the federal government 20

23 C4.2: Recognize government and citizen participation in international organizations Benchmark Clarification BC1 BC2 BC3/BC4 Task For each of the five major international organizations, create a picture with a caption of less than FIVE words that reflect their goals Think about what the UN does. Why do you think NYC is a good place to headquarter the UN in the US? Read through the chart, focusing on the various ways that people can get involved in international organizations. What are the THREE most common methods? Which one could you see yourself doing the most and why? Extra Practice: UN Benchmark Task: Using what you have learned from the readings on international organizations, choose three organizations and explain the function of the organization and how a country or individual citizens can participate and/or support the organization. 21

24 SS.7.C.4.2 Recognize government and citizen participation in international organizations. SS.7.C.4.2 Benchmark Clarification 1: Students will identify major international organizations in which government plays a role. The end of World War II, and more specifically the Holocaust, brought international attention to issues and problems of worldwide concern. People all over the world began to pay closer attention to human rights (rights that people have because they exist) and different organizations were created to support these concerns. Governments all over the world created and participated in a number of international organizations that protected human rights and focused on economic and trade related concerns. Below are some examples of major international organizations in which governments participate. Name of Organization North American Free Trade Agreement North Atlantic Treaty Organization United Nations World Trade Organization International Court of Justice (World Court) Short Form Name NAFTA NATO UN WTO No short form name. Symbol Purpose Allows free trade among the United States, Canada and Mexico and has opened new markets, created jobs, and encouraged growth in the economies of its members. The governments of the United States, Mexico and Canada encourage the purchase and sale of each other s goods. A group of 28 countries that have agreed to protect each other in case of attack; specifically started to protect themselves against aggression by the Soviet Union and its communist allies. It is a military and defense agreement among the governments of member nations. Created to keep peace worldwide and develop friendly relationship among nations. 193 nations (governments) are members of the United Nations. Countries may join the General Assembly. The WTO was created to promote trade and economic growth by lowering taxes and other trade limitations. Countries may join and make agreements related to trade and taxes. The World Court offers legal advice to the UN and handles international legal concerns such as boundary issues and debt payments. Countries may become members by meeting the requirements of the UN. Individuals may work or intern with the World Court. 22

25 SS.7.C.4.2 Recognize government and citizen participation in international organizations. SS.7.C.4.2 Benchmark Clarification 2: Students will recognize that international organizations may be located in the United States. Several international organizations exist that protect human rights (the rights of all people) and focus on economic and trade related concerns. While these organizations have members from countries around the world, some of these organizations are located in the United States. The United Nations is headquartered in New York City. The UN was founded after World War II and is an organization that keeps peace and helps to develop friendly relationships between and among countries. 193 nations (governments) are members of the United Nations and meet in New York City at different times throughout the year. 23

26 SS.7.C.4.2 Recognize government and citizen participation in international organizations. SS.7.C.4.2 Benchmark Clarification 3: Students will describe the ways that individual citizens and government can seek participating in international organizations. Both individuals and nations governments can participate in international organizations. Below are some examples of how people and governments can get involved. Name of Organization International Red Cross/ Red Crescent Non- Governmental Organizations (NGOs) International Non- Governmental Organizations (INGOs) Short Form Name No short form name NGO/INGO Symbol Purpose The International Red Cross is an international humanitarian organization with approximately 97 million volunteers, members and staff. It was founded to protect human life and health, to guarantee respect for all human beings, and to prevent and relieve human suffering. Individuals and governments can support this international organization by donating money, raising awareness, and volunteering. NGOs/INGOs are types of organizations that work independent of any government. They are private organizations that work to relieve suffering, promote the interests of the poor, protect the environment, provide basic social services, or assist with community development. These NGOs/INGOs operate independently from any government and maintain their non-governmental (no government is involved) position by not allowing government representatives to join their organizations. United Nations UN An organization that was created to keep peace worldwide and develop friendly relationship among nations. United Nations Children s Fund International Court of Justice UNICEF Also known as the World Court 193 nations (government) are members of the United Nations. Countries can join the General Assembly. Individuals can donate money to the UN, apply for internships with the UN or work for them directly. A United Nations program headquartered in New York City, which provides long-term help and care to mothers and children in developing nations. They work to benefit a variety of issues related to children such as education, vaccinations, nutrition, and other issues. Individuals can contribute to UNICEF by donating money, raising awareness, purchasing gifts, or signing up for social media alerts. The World Court offers legal advice to the UN and handles international legal concerns such as boundary issues and debt payments. Countries can become members by meeting the requirements of the UN. Individuals can work or intern with the World Court. 24

27 SS.7.C.4.2 Recognize government and citizen participation in international organizations. SS.7.C.4.2 Benchmark Clarification 4: Students will examine the ways that government and individuals may support international organizations. Both individuals and nations governments can support international organizations. Below are some examples of how people and governments can help. Name of Organization International Red Cross/ Red Crescent Non- Governmental Organizations (NGOs) International Non- Governmental Organizations (INGOs) Short Form Name No short form name NGO/INGO Symbol Purpose The International Red Cross is an international humanitarian movement with approximately 97 million volunteers, members and staff. It was founded to protect human life and health, to guarantee respect for all human beings, and to prevent and relieve human suffering. Individuals and governments can support this international organization by donating money, raising awareness, and volunteering. NGOs/INGOs are types of organizations that work independent of any government. They are private organizations that work to relieve suffering, promote the interests of the poor, protect the environment, provide basic social services, or assist with community development. These NGOs/INGOs operate independently from any government and maintain their non-governmental (no government is involved) position by not allowing government representatives to join their organizations. United Nations UN An organization that was created to keep peace worldwide and develop friendly relationship among nations. United Nations Children s Fund International Court of Justice UNICEF Also known as the World Court 193 nations (government) are members of the United Nations. Countries can join the General Assembly. Individuals can donate money to the UN, apply for internships with the UN or work for them directly. A United Nations program headquartered in New York City, which provides long-term help and care to mothers and children in developing nations. They work to benefit a variety of issues related to children such as education, vaccinations, nutrition, and other issues. Individuals can contribute to UNICEF by donating money, raising awareness, purchasing gifts, or signing up for social media alerts. The World Court offers legal advice to the UN and handles international legal concerns such as boundary issues and debt payments. Countries can become members by meeting the requirements of the UN. Individuals can work or intern with the World Court. 25

Unit One: Quarter Three. Name:

Unit One: Quarter Three. Name: SS.7.C.3.3 Structure and Function of the LEGISLATIVE BRANCH ****At the end of this lesson, I will be able to do the following: recognize the structure of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.

More information

FEDERALISM SS.7.C.3.4 Identify the relationship and division of powers between the federal government and state governments.

FEDERALISM SS.7.C.3.4 Identify the relationship and division of powers between the federal government and state governments. FEDERALISM SS.7.C.3.4 Identify the relationship and division of powers between the federal government and state governments. TABLE OF CONTENTS Lesson Summary... 2 Suggested Student Activity Sequence...

More information

Enlightenment Separation of Powers Natural Law Social Contract Montesquieu John Locke

Enlightenment Separation of Powers Natural Law Social Contract Montesquieu John Locke SS.7.C.1.1: Recognize how Enlightenment ideas including Montesquieu's view of separation of power and John Locke's theories related to natural law and how Locke's social contract influenced the Founding

More information

To exit session, click red X in top right corner. Confirm OK. Chat is used only to ask or answer questions when prompted

To exit session, click red X in top right corner. Confirm OK. Chat is used only to ask or answer questions when prompted Welcome to today s Live Lesson session with Mrs. Silvers! We will be getting started soon In the meantime, please make sure that your sound is turned ON and also complete the Audio Setup Wizard while you

More information

Enlightenment Separation of Powers Natural Law Social Contract Montesquieu John Locke

Enlightenment Separation of Powers Natural Law Social Contract Montesquieu John Locke SS.7.C.1.1: Recognize how Enlightenment ideas including Montesquieu's view of separation of power and John Locke's theories related to natural law and how Locke's social contract influenced the Founding

More information

Highlights: The Relationship and Division of Powers between the Federal and State Governments SS.7.C.3.4

Highlights: The Relationship and Division of Powers between the Federal and State Governments SS.7.C.3.4 Highlights: The Relationship and Division of Powers between the Federal and State Governments SS.7.C.3.4 Identify the relationship and division of powers between the federal government and state governments.

More information

SS.7.C.4.1 Domestic and Foreign Policy alliance allies ambassador diplomacy diplomat embassy foreign policy treaty

SS.7.C.4.1 Domestic and Foreign Policy alliance allies ambassador diplomacy diplomat embassy foreign policy treaty The Executive Branch test will include the following items: Chapter 8 textbook, SS.7.C.3.3 Illustrate the structure and function of the (three branches of government established in Articles I, II, and

More information

Social Studies Lesson Plan Give examples of powers granted to the federal government and those reserved for the states.

Social Studies Lesson Plan Give examples of powers granted to the federal government and those reserved for the states. Teacher s Name: Employee Number: School: Social Studies Lesson Plan Give examples of powers granted to the federal government and those reserved for the states. 1. Title: Federal and State Powers 2. Overview

More information

EOC Civics Unit #4 Review. Organization and Function of Government

EOC Civics Unit #4 Review. Organization and Function of Government EOC Civics Unit #4 Review Organization and Function of Government Forms of Government SS.7.C.3.1 Democracy = We The People = Self-Government Direct Democracy Everyone makes decisions Florida is a DD for

More information

Citizenship Just the Facts.Civics Learning Goals for the 4th Nine Weeks.

Citizenship Just the Facts.Civics Learning Goals for the 4th Nine Weeks. .Civics Learning Goals for the 4th Nine Weeks. C.4.1 Differentiate concepts related to U.S. domestic and foreign policy - Recognize the difference between domestic and foreign policy - Identify issues

More information

The US Constitution. Articles of the Constitution

The US Constitution. Articles of the Constitution The US Constitution Articles of the Constitution Article I delegates all legislative power to the bicameral Congress. The two chambers differ in the qualifications required of their members, the term of

More information

State and Local Government in the United States

State and Local Government in the United States State and Local Government in the United States www.whitehouse.gov The United States have three levels of government; a federal level, a state level and a local level. Each one has its own features and

More information

Civics EOC. Assembled by the Citrus County Research & Accountability Department

Civics EOC. Assembled by the Citrus County Research & Accountability Department Civics EOC All 35 of the questions on this Civics EOC are from the Florida Civics EOC Test Item Specifications. An electronic copy of the Item Specifications can be found at http://fcat.fldoe.org/eoc/pdf/fl12spiscivicswtr2g.pdf

More information

Week # Date Benchmark # s to Complete 1 3/30 4/4 Citizen You! SS.7.C.2.1; SS.7.C.2.2; SS.7.C.2.3; SS.7.C.2.14; SS.7.C.1.9

Week # Date Benchmark # s to Complete 1 3/30 4/4 Citizen You! SS.7.C.2.1; SS.7.C.2.2; SS.7.C.2.3; SS.7.C.2.14; SS.7.C.1.9 Name: Date: Per.: Civics End of Course Exam Online Benchmark Review 1. Visit civics360.org. First time only follow the prompts to create an account using your school email. 2. Scroll down to see a list

More information

Unit #11: The National Government

Unit #11: The National Government Unit #11: The National Government 1. What document defines the current structure and powers of the national government? A. Magna Carta B. Articles of Confederation C. Constitution of the United States

More information

nations united with another for some common purpose such as assistance and protection

nations united with another for some common purpose such as assistance and protection SS.7.C.4.1 Differentiate concepts related to U.S. domestic and foreign policy. Students will recognize the difference between domestic and foreign policy. Students will identify issues that relate to U.S.

More information

SS.7.C.2.4 Evaluate rights contained in the Bill of Rights and other amendments to the Constitution

SS.7.C.2.4 Evaluate rights contained in the Bill of Rights and other amendments to the Constitution Civics 2 nd Quarter Exam Study Guide Use your worksheet reading pages and the following chapters in the workbook to complete this study guide. Refer to past tests and progress checks for additional review.

More information

Branching Out. The Structure and Function of the Federal Government. Benchmarks

Branching Out. The Structure and Function of the Federal Government. Benchmarks Branching Out The Structure and Function of the Federal Government Benchmarks SS.7.C.3.3 Illustrate the structure and function (three branches of government established in Articles I, II, and III with

More information

Three Branches of the American Government Packet

Three Branches of the American Government Packet Name: Three es of the American Government Packet THREE BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT Directions: Use the Civics in Action section in your book to complete the flow chart below by filling in the blanks with words

More information

Judicial Branch. SS.7.c.3.11 Diagram the levels, functions, and powers of courts at the state and federal levels.

Judicial Branch. SS.7.c.3.11 Diagram the levels, functions, and powers of courts at the state and federal levels. Judicial Branch SS.7.c.3.11 Diagram the levels, functions, and powers of courts at the state and federal levels. U.S. Supreme Court Judicial branch of our federal government is in charge of resolving disputes

More information

The Articles of Confederation

The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation was the first government of the United States following the Declaration of Independence. A confederation is a state-centered, decentralized government

More information

Civics EOC Exam Preparation

Civics EOC Exam Preparation Civics EOC Exam Preparation Welcome! Sit in groups of four at each table. Presenter Mr. Regnier Do not doodle on the dry erase boards. The U.S. System of Federalism Federal State Local Benchmark Identify

More information

Social Studies Grade 5 Optional

Social Studies Grade 5 Optional The School District of Palm Beach County Social Studies Grade 5 Optional Standard 3: Structure and Functions of Government SS.5.C.3.3 Give examples of powers granted to the federal government and those

More information

Georgia Standards of Excellence American Government and Civics 2016

Georgia Standards of Excellence American Government and Civics 2016 A Correlation of 2016 To the Georgia Standards of Excellence American Government and Civics 2016 FORMAT FOR CORRELATION TO THE GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE (GSE) GRADES K-12 SOCIAL STUDIES AND SCIENCE

More information

Going Over the LEJ. Analyzing the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial Branches. Benchmarks

Going Over the LEJ. Analyzing the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial Branches. Benchmarks Going Over the LEJ Analyzing the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial Branches Benchmarks SS.7.C.3.8 Analyze the structure, functions, and processes of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.

More information

REPORTING CATEGORY 3: GOVERNMENT POLICIES AND POLITICAL PROCESSES

REPORTING CATEGORY 3: GOVERNMENT POLICIES AND POLITICAL PROCESSES REPORTING CATEGORY 3: GOVERNMENT POLICIES AND POLITICAL PROCESSES SS.7.C.2.8: Identify America's current political parties, and illustrate their ideas about government. A political party is a group of

More information

LAW-MAKING FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL LEVEL SS.7.C.3.9

LAW-MAKING FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL LEVEL SS.7.C.3.9 LAW-MAKING FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL LEVEL SS.7.C.3.9 Use the PowerPoint to complete the work. By the end of this lesson I will be able to SS.7.C.3.9 Illustrate the lawmaking process at the local, state

More information

Congress. Congress STEP BY STEP. one Congress in a FLASH reading page to each student. students to complete the activities in the review worksheet.

Congress. Congress STEP BY STEP. one Congress in a FLASH reading page to each student. students to complete the activities in the review worksheet. Teacher s Guide Congress Time Needed: One class period Materials Needed: Student worksheets Copy Instructions: Reading (2 pages; class set) Primary Document Activity (1 page; class set) Review Worksheet

More information

9.1 Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to

9.1 Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to 9.1 Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to convince their states to approve the document that they

More information

Chapter 3 The Constitution. Section 1 Structure and Principles

Chapter 3 The Constitution. Section 1 Structure and Principles Chapter 3 The Constitution Section 1 Structure and Principles The Constitution The Founders... 1) created the Constitution more than 200 years ago. 2) like Montesquieu, believed in separation of powers.

More information

Define : Appointment confirmation:

Define : Appointment confirmation: Define : Appointment confirmation: Committee selection: How a Bill becomes a law? Term: Definitions: Appointment Confirmation Committee Selection How a Bill Becomes a Law Definition The Senate approving

More information

9.3. The Legislative Branch Makes Laws For the framers of the Constitution,

9.3. The Legislative Branch Makes Laws For the framers of the Constitution, 9.3. The Legislative Branch Makes Laws For the framers of the Constitution, the first step in building a trusted government was to create a fair way to make laws. Article I of the Constitution gives the

More information

Unit One: Quarter Three. Name:

Unit One: Quarter Three. Name: SS.7.C.3.3 Structure and Function of the LEGISLATIVE BRANCH ****At the end of this lesson, I will be able to do the following: recognize the structure of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.

More information

The Six Basic Principles

The Six Basic Principles The Constitution The Six Basic Principles The Constitution is only about 7000 words One of its strengths is that it does not go into great detail. It is based on six principles that are embodied throughout

More information

Branch, Section 1) What is the job of the Legislative Branch? Where are the powers of Congress outlined in the Constitution?

Branch, Section 1) What is the job of the Legislative Branch? Where are the powers of Congress outlined in the Constitution? Civics Unit 3 (Chapter 5, the Legislative Branch) I. The Senate and the H. of R. (Chapter 5 The Legislative Branch, Section 1) What is the job of the Legislative Branch? Where are the powers of Congress

More information

Congress had the power over relations, foreign, with the capacity to create alliance and form

Congress had the power over relations, foreign, with the capacity to create alliance and form Surname 1 Name: Course: Instructor: Date: The Articles of Confederation were the first written constitution of the United States. These Articles created a legislature where there was equal representation

More information

Congress. Congress STEP BY STEP. through the first reading page with the class. one Primary Document Activity and Review Activity to each student.

Congress. Congress STEP BY STEP. through the first reading page with the class. one Primary Document Activity and Review Activity to each student. Teacher s Guide Congress Time Needed: One class period Materials Needed: Student worksheets Copy Instructions: Reading (2 pages; class set) Primary Document Activity (1 page; class set) Review Activity

More information

US Constitution. Articles I-VII

US Constitution. Articles I-VII US Constitution Articles I-VII Quick Questions What is the Constitution? What is the Preamble? What are the Articles and their purpose? Preamble Six Purposes are Listed -> What are they? We the people

More information

The Constitution. Name: The Law of the Land. What Does Our Constitution Look Like? The Constitution s Table of Contents

The Constitution. Name: The Law of the Land. What Does Our Constitution Look Like? The Constitution s Table of Contents The Law of the Land A constitution is a document that gives the rules for how a government should run. The Framers wrote our Constitution to create a government for the new United States of America. Creating

More information

American Government Branches of Government: A Closer Look

American Government Branches of Government: A Closer Look Non-fiction: American Government Branches of Government: A Closer Look American Government Branches of Government: A Closer Look The Constitution of the United States establishes three separate branches

More information

LEVELS & BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT

LEVELS & BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT LEVELS & BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT Who serves in the Legislative Branch? LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT Who serves in the executive branch? Executive Branch Enforces the law Who serves in the judicial

More information

Civics Learning Goals for the 3 rd Quarter

Civics Learning Goals for the 3 rd Quarter Civics Learning Goals for the 3 rd Quarter 2017-18 Unit: The U.S. and the World C.4.1 Differentiate concepts related to U.S. domestic and foreign policy. - Students will recognize the difference between

More information

netw rks Federal and State Powers State Government L esson 1: The Federal System ESSENTIAL QUESTION Terms to Know GUIDING QUESTIONS Vocabulary

netw rks Federal and State Powers State Government L esson 1: The Federal System ESSENTIAL QUESTION Terms to Know GUIDING QUESTIONS Vocabulary L esson 1: The Federal System ESSENTIAL QUESTION Why and how do people create, structure, and change governments? GUIDING QUESTIONS 1. How does the federal system allow the national government and state

More information

Chapter 9 - The Constitution: A More Perfect Union

Chapter 9 - The Constitution: A More Perfect Union Chapter 9 - The Constitution: A More Perfect Union 9.1 - Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to convince

More information

Social Studies Curriculum Guide Ninth Grade AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

Social Studies Curriculum Guide Ninth Grade AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Social Studies Curriculum Guide Ninth Grade AMERICAN GOVERNMENT It is the policy of the Fulton County School System not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age,

More information

Legislative Branch (also called Congress)

Legislative Branch (also called Congress) Name: Hour: Three Branches Review Sheet This should be completed for your test. Write your answers here or if you need more space on a separate sheet of paper. Legislative Branch (also called Congress)

More information

Who attended the Philadelphia Convention? How was it organized? We the People, Unit 3 Lesson 12

Who attended the Philadelphia Convention? How was it organized? We the People, Unit 3 Lesson 12 Who attended the Philadelphia Convention? How was it organized? We the People, Unit 3 Lesson 12 A convention has been called to rewrite Redwood school constitution. We need some delegates (representatives).

More information

Civics Curriculum Guide

Civics Curriculum Guide Civics Curriculum Guide 2015-2016 Column 1: Standards The standards are the benchmarks that our state decides as what must be taught by teachers and learned by students in a given grade level and content

More information

PROFESSIONAL TEACHING STANDARDS BOARD. United States Constitution Study Guide

PROFESSIONAL TEACHING STANDARDS BOARD. United States Constitution Study Guide PROFESSIONAL TEACHING STANDARDS BOARD United States Constitution Study Guide Section 21-7-304, Wyoming Statutes, 1969--"All persons hereafter applying for certificates authorizing them to become administrators

More information

A Correlation of. To the. Louisiana High School Civics Standards 2011

A Correlation of. To the. Louisiana High School Civics Standards 2011 A Correlation of 2016 To the Civics Standards 2011 Introduction This document demonstrates how Pearson American Government, 2016 meets the Civics Standards, 2011. Hailed as a stellar educational resource

More information

Part Two Print out the Elected Officials Sheet and complete questions. Make sure you pay attention to state officials and national officials.

Part Two Print out the Elected Officials Sheet and complete questions. Make sure you pay attention to state officials and national officials. Honors Civics Summer Work 2013-2014 Part One Print off the web quest, and complete all assignments and place in a folder/notebook. Make sure your answers are complete with details (the more detail the

More information

The Structure and Functions of the Government

The Structure and Functions of the Government The Structure and Functions of the Government The United States of America is a democratic republic or an indirect government. In definition, it means that when the people vote, they give the power to

More information

Constitution Day Lesson STEP BY STEP

Constitution Day Lesson STEP BY STEP Teacher s Guide Time Needed: One Class Period Materials Needed: Student worksheets Scissors and glue or tape (optional) Transparency or Projector (optional) Copy Instructions: Reading (4 pages; class set)

More information

Ch. 5 Test Legislative Branch Government

Ch. 5 Test Legislative Branch Government Name: Date: 1. In 1998, California had forty-five representatives in the U.S. House of Representatives while Louisiana had seven. What accounts for the difference in these numbers? A. area of the states

More information

A Correlation of. Prentice Hall Magruder s American Government To the. Nevada Social Studies Standards Social Studies Skills & Civics

A Correlation of. Prentice Hall Magruder s American Government To the. Nevada Social Studies Standards Social Studies Skills & Civics A Correlation of Prentice Hall American Government 2011 To the Social Studies Skills & Civics Grades 9-12 Prentice Hall,, Grades 9-12 Introduction This document demonstrates how American Government 2010

More information

Comparing the U.S. Constitution & The Florida State Constitution. Mr. Raymond s Civics EOC Academy

Comparing the U.S. Constitution & The Florida State Constitution. Mr. Raymond s Civics EOC Academy Comparing the U.S. Constitution & The Florida State Constitution Mr. Raymond s Civics EOC Academy Last time: Federalism the National, State & Local Governments working together Benchmark: SS.7.C.3.13 Compare

More information

Chapter 3: The Constitution

Chapter 3: The Constitution Chapter 3: The Constitution United States Government Week on October 2, 2017 The Constitution: Structure Pictured: James Madison Structure Preamble: introduction that states why the Constitution was written

More information

Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.4.C.2.2 Identify ways citizens work together to influence government and help solve community and state problems

Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.4.C.2.2 Identify ways citizens work together to influence government and help solve community and state problems Teacher s Name: Employee Number: School: Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.4.C.2.2 Identify ways citizens work together to 1. Title: HOW A Bill Becomes a Law - 4 th Grade 2. Overview - Big Ideas: Enduring

More information

Student Name: Civics 3 rd Quarter Civics Study Guide

Student Name: Civics 3 rd Quarter Civics Study Guide Civics 3 rd Quarter Civics Study Guide Page 1 Student Name: Civics 3 rd Quarter Civics Study Guide Date: In completing this study guide, you will need to draw on your knowledge from throughout the 3 rd

More information

understanding CONSTITUTION

understanding CONSTITUTION understanding the CONSTITUTION Contents The Articles of Confederation The Constitutional Convention The Principles of the Constitution The Preamble The Legislative Branch The Executive Branch The Judicial

More information

Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.3.C.3.3. Recognize that every state has a state constitution

Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.3.C.3.3. Recognize that every state has a state constitution Teacher s Name: Employee Number: School: Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.3.C.3.3 Recognize that every state has a state 1. Title: Every State Has a State Constitution 2. Overview - Big Ideas: Enduring Understandings

More information

The Origins of political thought and the Constitution

The Origins of political thought and the Constitution The Origins of political thought and the Constitution Social Contract Theory The implied agreement between citizens and the gov t saying that citizens will obey the gov t and give up certain freedoms in

More information

The Constitution. Name: The Law of the Land. What Does Our Constitution Look Like?

The Constitution. Name: The Law of the Land. What Does Our Constitution Look Like? The Law of the Land A constitution is a document that gives the rules for how a government should run. The Framers wrote our Constitution to create a government for the new United States of America. Creating

More information

[ 5.1 ] The Presidency An Overview. [ 5.1 ] The Presidency An Overview. The President's Many Roles. [ 5.1 ] The Presidency An Overview

[ 5.1 ] The Presidency An Overview. [ 5.1 ] The Presidency An Overview. The President's Many Roles. [ 5.1 ] The Presidency An Overview [ 5.1 ] The Presidency An Overview [ 5.1 ] The Presidency An Overview The President's Many Roles chief of state term for the President as the ceremonial head of the United States, the symbol of all the

More information

The Constitution. A Blueprint to the Government

The Constitution. A Blueprint to the Government The Constitution A Blueprint to the Government The Preamble We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common

More information

Magruder's American Government 2011

Magruder's American Government 2011 A Correlation of Magruder's American Government 2011 To the INTRODUCTION This document demonstrates how American Government 2011 meets the. Correlation page references are to the Student and Teacher s

More information

10/6/11. A look at the history and organization of US Constitution

10/6/11. A look at the history and organization of US Constitution A look at the history and organization of US Constitution During Revolution, the states created a confederation. Loose association of states. Continental Congress responsible to war effort during the Revolution.

More information

What are three concepts found in the Magna Carta that influenced the Founding Fathers?

What are three concepts found in the Magna Carta that influenced the Founding Fathers? Study Guide: Civics EOC Exam John Locke: What ideas is he known for? What is the social contract? Montesquieu: How did he influence the Founding Fathers? What are three concepts found in the Magna Carta

More information

Subject Area: Social Studies State-Funded Course: American Government/Civics

Subject Area: Social Studies State-Funded Course: American Government/Civics The Georgia Performance s for grades K-12 Fine Arts, K-12 Social Studies, K-12 Health and Physical Education, and SSCG1 SSCG1 a. SSCG1 b. he student will demonstrate knowledge of the political philosophies

More information

The Scope of Congressional Powers. Congressional Power. Strict Versus Liberal Construction

The Scope of Congressional Powers. Congressional Power. Strict Versus Liberal Construction The Scope of Congressional Powers What are the three types of congressional power? How does strict construction of the U.S. Constitution on the subject of congressional power compare to liberal construction?

More information

We the People Lesson 15. How did the Framers resolve the conflict about powers of the legislative branch?

We the People Lesson 15. How did the Framers resolve the conflict about powers of the legislative branch? We the People Lesson 15 How did the Framers resolve the conflict about powers of the legislative branch? The Capitol Building How much power should Congress have? Framers agreed stronger Nat l gov t needed

More information

American Government Branches of Government: A Closer Look

American Government Branches of Government: A Closer Look Non-fiction: American Government Branches of Government: A Closer Look American Government Branches of Government: A Closer Look The Constitution of the United States established three separate branches

More information

The Federal in Federalism STEP BY STEP

The Federal in Federalism STEP BY STEP Teacher s Guide Time Needed: One class period Materials Needed: Student Worksheets Projector (optional) Tape Copy Instructions: Reading (3 pages; class set) Federal Power Cheat Sheet (1 page; class set)

More information

AP U.S. Government & Politics Exam Must Know Vocabulary

AP U.S. Government & Politics Exam Must Know Vocabulary AP U.S. Government & Politics Exam Must Know Vocabulary Amicus curiae brief: friend of the court brief filed by an interest group to influence a Supreme Court decision. Appellate jurisdiction: authority

More information

We the People.. The Failings of the Articles of Confederation and the Solutions of the Constitutional Convention Unit Two- BD

We the People.. The Failings of the Articles of Confederation and the Solutions of the Constitutional Convention Unit Two- BD We the People.. The Failings of the Articles of Confederation and the Solutions of the Constitutional Convention Unit Two- BD Sorting Out the Problems: Article One * Two plans are put forth to address

More information

All In a Day s Work. The Coolest Job in the Country! Name:

All In a Day s Work. The Coolest Job in the Country! Name: The Coolest Job in the Country! Imagine you have been elected President of the United States. What do you think would be the best part of the job? Having your own personal jet? Living in the White House?

More information

Chapter 6. APUSH Mr. Muller

Chapter 6. APUSH Mr. Muller Chapter 6 APUSH Mr. Muller Aim: How is the New Republic tested? Do Now: Thus I consent, sir, to this Constitution, because I expect no better, and because I am not sure that it is not the best. The opinions

More information

Constitution Day September 17

Constitution Day September 17 Constitution Day September 17 Articles of Confederation March 1, 1781- goes into effect No Executive Branch-No single leader No Judicial Branch-No national courts No power to collect taxes No power to

More information

That s An Order. Lesson Overview. Procedures

That s An Order. Lesson Overview. Procedures Lesson Overview Overview: This lesson will explore s as used by presidents of the past and present. Students will evaluate the concept of s and establish a position on the constitutionality of executive

More information

American Government Branches of Government: A Closer Look

American Government Branches of Government: A Closer Look Non-fiction: American Government Branches of Government: A Closer Look American Government Branches of Government: A Closer Look The Constitution of the United States established three separate branches

More information

The S e cope o e f f Congressi essi nal al P ower w s

The S e cope o e f f Congressi essi nal al P ower w s The Scope of Congressional Powers What are the three types of congressional power? How does strict construction of the U.S. Constitution on the subject of congressional power compare to liberal construction?

More information

American Government. C H A P T E R 11 Powers of Congress

American Government. C H A P T E R 11 Powers of Congress American Government C H A P T E R 11 Powers of Congress C H A P T E R 11 Powers of Congress SECTION 1 The Scope of Congressional Powers SECTION 2 The Expressed Powers of Money and Commerce SECTION 3 Other

More information

Magruder s American Government

Magruder s American Government Presentation Pro Magruder s American Government C H A P T E R 11 Powers of Congress 2001 by Prentice Hall, Inc. C H A P T E R 11 Powers of Congress SECTION 1 The Scope of Congressional Powers SECTION 2

More information

For the President, All in a Day s Work STEP BY STEP. one Anticipation Activity worksheet to each student. the worksheet activities to the class.

For the President, All in a Day s Work STEP BY STEP. one Anticipation Activity worksheet to each student. the worksheet activities to the class. Teacher s Guide Time Needed: One class period Materials Needed: Student worksheets For the President, All in a Day s Work Learning Objectives. Students will be able to: Identify powers of the executive

More information

Essential Question: What justifies the limitation or promotion of freedom?

Essential Question: What justifies the limitation or promotion of freedom? Name _ Period Parent Signature (EC) LESSON PACKET - We The People 7 th Social Studies DUE DATE:_ Essential Question: What justifies the limitation or promotion of freedom? Directions: Read the following

More information

Ratification. By March 1781, all 13 Colonies had ratified the Articles of Confederation, making it the official written plan of government.

Ratification. By March 1781, all 13 Colonies had ratified the Articles of Confederation, making it the official written plan of government. The Goal To form a confederation of states - A Firm League of Friendship To continue the form of government established by the Second Continental Congress Ratification By March 1781, all 13 Colonies had

More information

The Constitution CHAPTER 5. Table of Contents

The Constitution CHAPTER 5. Table of Contents CHAPTER 5 The Constitution ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: Why do people, create, structure, and change governments? How do societies balance individual and community rights? How does social change influence government?

More information

The Constitution. Name: The Law of the Land. What Does Our Constitution Look Like?

The Constitution. Name: The Law of the Land. What Does Our Constitution Look Like? The Law of the Land A constitution is a document that gives the rules for how a government should run. The Framers wrote our Constitution to create a government for the new United States of America. Creating

More information

Nine of the 13 states had to approve the Constitution in. order for it to be the law of the land. This happened on June 21,

Nine of the 13 states had to approve the Constitution in. order for it to be the law of the land. This happened on June 21, Task 1: Read Nine of the 13 states had to approve the Constitution in order for it to be the law of the land. This happened on June 21, 1788 when New Hampshire ratified it. The government of the United

More information

Answer Key for Writing Assignment

Answer Key for Writing Assignment Answer Key for Writing Assignment UNITED STATES NATIONAL GOVERNMENT ONLY: President is ultimate authority over states and tribes of the U.S. President can negotiate treaties with other countries. The President

More information

Constitution Cheat Sheet

Constitution Cheat Sheet Constitution Cheat Sheet The Preamble to the Constitution has no force in law; instead, it establishes the "Why" of the Constitution. Why is this document in existence? It reflects the desires of the Framers

More information

Chapter 18 The Judicial Branch

Chapter 18 The Judicial Branch Chapter 18 The Judicial Branch Creation of a National Judiciary The Framers created the national judiciary in Article III of the Constitution. There are two court systems in the United States: the national

More information

Federal Constitution Test Review & Study Guide

Federal Constitution Test Review & Study Guide Name: AP GOPO 2018-2019 AP United States Government & Politics (AP GOPO) Sumer Work Federal Constitution Test Review & Study Guide AP Government will require you to do a high level of work and to have

More information

Name Class Period. MAIN IDEA PACKET: Government Institutions AMERICAN GOVERNMENT CHAPTERS 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 & 18

Name Class Period. MAIN IDEA PACKET: Government Institutions AMERICAN GOVERNMENT CHAPTERS 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 & 18 Name Class Period UNIT 4 MAIN IDEA PACKET: Government Institutions AMERICAN GOVERNMENT CHAPTERS 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 & 18 CHAPTER 10 CONGRESS Chapter 10 Section 1: The National Legislature Congress,

More information

Foundations Series: American Government 2010

Foundations Series: American Government 2010 A Correlation of American Government 2010 South Carolina Social Studies Standards for U.S. Government Grades 9-12 INTRODUCTION This document demonstrates how meets the objectives of the U.S. Government.

More information

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation Articles of Confederation Do Now How is power divided in our country today? SWBAT Analyze government problems under the Articles of Confederation Activity Review the Articles of Confederation chart and

More information

Chapter 3: The Constitution Section 1

Chapter 3: The Constitution Section 1 Chapter 3: The Constitution Section 1 Objectives EQ: How does the constitution function in a way that has been flexible over a long period of time? Copyright Pearson Education, Inc. Slide 2 Standards Content

More information

UNIT II: THE U.S. CONSTITUTION

UNIT II: THE U.S. CONSTITUTION UNIT II: THE U.S. CONSTITUTION Seven Articles Separation of Powers Principles of Federalism Ilovesocialstudies.com SEVEN ARTICLES Article I Establishes the Legislative Branch Article II Establishes the

More information

A More Perfect Union. The Three Branches of the Federal Government. Teacher s Guide. The Presidency The Congress The Supreme Court

A More Perfect Union. The Three Branches of the Federal Government. Teacher s Guide. The Presidency The Congress The Supreme Court A More Perfect Union The Three Branches of the Federal Government The Presidency The Congress The Supreme Court Teacher s Guide Teacher s Guide for A More Perfect Union : The Three Branches of the Federal

More information

Recognizing the problem/agenda setting: ormulating the policy: Adopting the policy: Implementing the policy: Evaluating the policy: ECONOMIC POLICY

Recognizing the problem/agenda setting: ormulating the policy: Adopting the policy: Implementing the policy: Evaluating the policy: ECONOMIC POLICY POLICY MAKING THE PROCESS Recognizing the problem/agenda setting: Almost no policy is made unless and until a need is recognized. Many different groups and people may bring a problem or issue to the government

More information