1 St Semester Exam Review

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1 1 St Semester Exam Review 2. In 1730, which section of the English colonies had the largest number of African Americans? A. the New England Colonies B. the Southern Colonies C. the Middle Colonies D. the Southern and Middles were about equal 3. Which statement about the African-American population in the 1700 is correct? A. It was increasing in all the colonies. B. It had increased slightly in the New England Colonies. C. It had not changed since 1690 in the Middle Colonies. D. It was the largest population group in the Southern Colonies. Use the line graph and your knowledge of social studies to answer questions 5 and Which region was mainly involved in shipbuilding, forestry, and fishing? A. Middle colonies B. Southern colonies C. New England D. Western frontier 4. Based on the information in the line graph, which statement about the colonial population is true? A. The population of the colonies remained unchanged from 1650 to B. The slave population grew faster than the total population. C. European immigration to the colonies decreased after D. The total population grew at a faster rate than the slave population. 5. Based on the information in the line graph, what conclusion can be drawn about the population of the colonies? A. There were more enslaved people than free colonists in 1770.

2 B. The enslaved population was declining in the British colonies. C. The total population of British colonists was rising dramatically. D. The total population of British colonists was unchanged after Based on the information in the pie charts, which statement is accurate? A. New England had a higher percentage of imports than it did of exports. B. The Middle Colonies were the largest exporters of goods to Britain. C. The Southern Colonies imported more than the New England and the Middle Colonies together. D. The Middle Colonies exported more than New England and the Southern Colonies together. 10. What conclusion can be drawn from these pie charts? A. Britain sent its goods all over the world. B. New England traded with many countries in Europe. C. Most British trade with the thirteen colonies was with the South. D. The Middle Colonies carried on an active trade with Canada. Use the passage and your knowledge of social studies to answer question Based on this passage from John Smith, what conclusion can be drawn about the lives of colonists in Jamestown, Virginia? A. The standard of living was similar to most European nations. B. Religion played an important part in the lives of early colonists. C. Local Native American Indians were a serious threat to early colonists. D. Growing tobacco was the main source of income of early colonists to Virginia. Use the passage and your knowledge of social studies to answer question Which of the following completes the excerpt? A. teach us how to craft their goods B. be converted to our holy faith C. be brought to our country as slaves D. teach us about the stars and planets

3 13. Which feature of colonial self-government does this charter establish? A. An elected legislature B. Direct democracy C. Separation of powers D. Checks and balances Use the political cartoon and your knowledge of social studies to answer question This diagram describes events in colonial America that are related to A. the eventual adoption of the U.S. Constitution B. the formation of a government controlled by religious officials C. the creation of a national system of checks and balances D. the establishment of the principle of religious freedom Colonial America Unit Test 14. The economic system illustrated by this cartoon was opposed by American colonists because it A. Supported colonial manufacturing B. Took gold and silver from American mines C. Required colonists to sell their raw materials to buy their finished goods from England D. Prohibited colonists from fishing or trading in furs Use the diagram and your knowledge of social studies to answer question How was the founding of the Virginia House of Burgesses similar to the signing of the Mayflower Compact? a. Both strengthened the English Parliament s control over the colonies. b. Both gave settlers the right to establish colonies. c. Both contributed to the development of representative democracy. d. Both created elected legislatures. 2. Which headline best explains the reason for the establishment of Jamestown in 1607? a. Settlers set off to find gold. b. Puritans seek religious freedom. c. A large number of debtors step off boat. d. Pilgrims flee in the hope of finding religious freedom.

4 3. 7. Which phrase best describes the most common reason for settlers leaving Europe to settle colonies in what is now the United States? a. Freedom from intolerance c. Economic opportunity b. Spread of democracy d. Escape from prison 8. Why is the Mayflower Compact considered an important step in the development of American democracy? a. It established the principle of separation of church and state. b. It provided a basis for self-government in the Plymouth Colony. c. It defined colonial relations with local Native American Indians. d. It outlawed slavery in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. 9. Which colony was created so debtors and poor people could start over? a. Delaware c. Georgia b. Carolina d. Maryland This passage from the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut was important to the concept of a democratic society because it represented -- a. an effort by the colonists to use force to resist the king. b. a step toward self-government in Colonial America. c. an attempt to institute voting rights for all colonists. d. an effort by the colonists to establish freedom of religion Which colonial settlement is correctly paired with the reason it was founded? a. North Carolina - haven for Pilgrims and Puritans b. Pennsylvania - refuge for English Catholics c. Maryland - refuge for Quakers d. Georgia - place for imprisoned debtors and convicts 5. How was the Virginia House of Burgesses important to the development of democracy in the thirteen colonies? a. It was the first representative assembly in the colonies. b. It created the first written constitution in America. c. It included a bill of rights to protect individual rights. d. It introduced the principle of electing judges. 6. Which best explains why colonial settlers first went to Plymouth Colony, Maryland, and Pennsylvania? a. to bring spices to the New World b. to search for gold and silver c. to secure freedom from religious persecution d. to convert Native Americans to Christianity Before arriving in North America, Winthrop penned his goals for the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Which statement about the colonial period can be supported from the excerpt? a. Some colonies were founded on religious principles. b. Some colonies were havens of religious tolerance. c. Some colonies required religious affiliation for holding an elective office. d. Some colonies promoted religious education in the public schools. 11. In which colonial region did good harbors, abundant forests, rocky soil, and a short growing season most influence the economy? a. Southern Colonies c. Middle Atlantic Colonies b. Northwest Territory d. New England Colonies 12. The hub of the shipping trade in North America was in -- a. the Ohio River valley. c. North Carolina. b. New England. d. South Carolina.

5 Which of these colonies was founded by English Catholics fleeing religious persecution? a. Maryland c. South Carolina b. New York d. Virginia 17. The Mayflower Compact and the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut are most closely associated with-- a. abuses by absolute monarchs. b. establishment of religious toleration. c. steps toward colonial self-government. d. adoption of universal suffrage. 15. The events listed on the box above all contributed to -- a. the beginning of the colonial slave trade. b. the decline of the colonial population. c. the end of religious activity. d. the growth of representative government. 18. Which factor played an important role in the development of the plantation system in the South? a. A short growing season prevented the planting of most crops. b. A lack of fertile soil limited agriculture. c. Colonial governments bought all the crops that plantations could produce. d. A warm climate permitted the growth of labor-intensive cash crops. _ 19. Which group in Colonial America experienced these conditions? a. Pilgrims on board the Mayflower b. indentured servants hired to work in the colonies c. enslaved Africans during the Middle Passage d. Native American Indians trading with French fur traders 20. Which geographic conditions discouraged the development of a plantation economy in the New England colonies? a. a wide coastal plain and an absence of good harbors b. rocky soil and short growing season c. numerous rivers and a humid climate d. flatlands and a lack of forests What important idea did these three historic documents have in common? a. The Parliament has control over the army. b. English subjects enjoy certain basic human rights. c. The king cannot pass new laws without approval from nobles. d. The people in the community agree to make their laws and respect them. 16. Labor for the Southern rice fields was provided by -- a. enslaved Africans. c. children. b. paid workers. d. tenants. 21. Which best explains why colonial farmers settled near oceans or coastal waterways? a. It was safer since fewer Native American Indians lived there. b. Colonial governments often paid farmers to settle there. c. The land was easier to clear since it had fewer trees and rocks. d. Transportation by water of goods and crops was easier. 22. The Jamestown settlers saved their colony by planting -- a. maize. c. tobacco. b. cotton. d. wheat.

6 23. The leg of the triangular trade route in which enslaved Africans were shipped to the West Indies was known as the -- a. Tidewater. c. First Leg. b. Slave Code. d. Middle Passage. 24. Because their journey had a religious purpose, the Separatists called themselves -- a. Pilgrims. c. Puritans. b. new colonists. d. strangers. 25. The movement that drove 15,000 Puritans to Massachusetts was called the -- a. Puritan Movement. c. Virginia Compact. b. Great Migration. d. Mayflower Compact. 26. The type of farming practiced in New England was -- a. subsistence. c. cash crop. b. plantation. d. backwater. Based on the graph, which statement is most accurate? a. In 1775, the majority of colonists came from Sweden. b. Colonists from Germany often faced discrimination. c. Most colonists could trace their roots to Europe. d. Few Africans were forced into a life of slavery. 27. Which region of the thirteen colonies is represented by Cluster A? a. frontier region c. New England Colonies b. Middle Atlantic Colonies d. Southern Colonies 28. What were among the chief exports produced by colonists in Cluster C? a. whale oil and silver c. textiles and tea b. potatoes and fish d. tobacco and rice 30. What valid conclusion about the colonial population can you draw from this pie chart? a. More people in the colonies were of English descent than all other European nationalities combined. b. Slaves made up 20 percent of the colonial population. c. The Dutch population lived entirely in New York. d. One out of every ten colonists was of either German or French background. The American Revolution Unit Test 5. How did the British policy of mercantilism limit the freedom of those living in the American colonies? a. By limiting all colonial settlements to land east of the Appalachian Mountains b. By imprisoning colonists who protested the British government c. By requiring the colonies to sell certain goods only to England d. By forcing colonists to give up all attemps at self-government 29.

7 6. A chapter in a textbook discusses the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, and the Boston Tea Party. The main topic of the chapter is most likely -- a. economic conflicts in colonial America. b. trade policies between Great Britain and colonial America. c. the causes of the American Revolution. d. the development of democratic institutions in the United States. 7. Which geographic feature served as the western boundary for British colonial settlements prior to the American Revolutionary War? a. Rocky Mountains c. Mississippi River b. Appalachian Mountains d. Great Plains The main reason that Great Britain established the Proclamation Line of 1763 was to -- a. allow Canada to control the Great Lakes region. b. avoid conflicts between American colonists and Native American Indians. c. make profits by selling land west of the Appalachian Mountains. d. protect the French Catholics of Quebec A study of the causes of the American Revolution would support the generalization that revolutions are likely to occur when -- a. those in power are resistant to change. b. a society has lower standards of living than those around it. c. a society has become industrialized. d. stable governments are in power. 13. Based on the chart, what was a major effect of the Stamp Act? a. The colonists no longer needed British goods. b. The British refused to sell certain products to the colonists. c. The law led to a decline in the value of colonial currency. d. Many colonists participated in actions in opposition to the act. 12. The American colonists used the slogan, No taxation without representation, to express their belief in the need for -- a. economic interdependence. c. mercantilism. b. the consent of the governed. d. Parliamentary supremacy. Which title most accurately describes the timeline? a. Forms of Colonial Protest b. The Effects of British Navigation Acts c. Events leading to the American Revolution d. The Abuse of Power by American Colonial Legislatures What colonial claim about the Boston Massacre is supported by this illustration? a. Most of the American colonists in Boston were killed. b. British soldiers fired on unarmed colonists. c. There were more soldiers than civilians at the Boston Massacre. d. Colonists were better equipped for war than British soldiers were.

8 Study the cause and effect diagram below. Which of the following choices best completes the diagram? On the night of December 16, 1773, a band of Bostonians disguised as Native Americans boarded three British ships anchored in Boston Harbor. The action depicted in the illustration was taken in response to the -- a. signing of the Mayflower Compact. b. passing of the Stamp Act by the British Parliament. c. imposing of British duties on tea. d. signing of the Declaration of Independence. 15. Which of the following acts completes the table below? Act of Parliament Effect Sugar Act Involved duties on imported molasses? Required certain colonies to house British soldiers Townshend Acts Added light taxation on glass, lead, paper, and tea Coercive (Intolerable) Acts Dissolved many rights of Massachusetts a. Quebec Act c. Quartering Act b. Navigation Acts d. Stamp Act 16. No taxation without representation was the response of many colonists to the -- a. sharing of tax revenues with Native Americans. b. provisions of the Treaty of Paris of c. British policies in the colonies after d. calling the First Continental Congress. a. allow free and democratic elections b. provide people the physical necessities of life c. protect the unalienable rights of the people d. accept the Articles of Confederation 18. The authors of the Declaration of Independence used the phrase Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. This phrase was used to identify -- a. unalienable rights. c. states rights. b. legal rights. d. economic rights. 19. In what way did the Declaration of Independence contribute to the development of democracy? a. It guaranteed trial by jury. b. It allowed women to take part in government. c. It stated that the people are the source of governmental power. d. It provided for the election of a President every four years. 20. The main purpose for writing the Declaration of Independence was to -- a. declare war on Great Britain. b. force Spain to support the Revolutionary War. c. convince Britain to abolish slavery. d. state the colonists reasons for separating from Great Britain. 21. Which action could be justified based on the political philosophy expressed in the Declaration of Independence? a. A country s dictator arrests political opponents. b. A government passes laws to strengthen racist policies. c. A monarchial government releases political terrorists. d. A group of rebels tries to overthrow an oppressive government.

9 25. Which statement is most consistent with the views of Samuel Adams? a. Taxation without representation is tyranny. b. Colonists should be grateful to be part of the British Empire. c. Citizens, under British rule, should support King George III. d. The English King deserves respect and loyalty from his subjects. 26. Which two individuals, who played key roles in the American Revolution, are described in columns A and B? a. Haym Solomon and James Armistead b. Benjamin Franklin and Patrick Henry c. John Adams and Wentworth Cheswell d. Bernardo de Galvez and Crispus Attucks 27. Who tried to rally colonial support for independence by writing a pamphlet with the title Common Sense? a. Samuel Adams c. George Washington b. Benjamin Franklin d. Thomas Paine 22. Which conclusion is best supported by the information in the chart? a. The Stamp Act led to widespread smuggling. b. Colonists raised revenue by imposing new taxes. c. British policies were opposed by many colonists. d. The colonists reacted to British laws in a nonviolent way. 23. The series of events shown in the chart led directly to the -- a. surrender of the Dutch in New York to England in b. start of the French and Indian War. c. issuance of the Proclamation Line of d. outbreak of the American Revolution. 24. Benjamin Franklin was one of the first colonial leaders to suggest a plan for joining all of the colonies. He outlined his plain in a document called the -- a. Albany Plan of Union c. Declaration of Independence b. Mayflower Compact d. Writs of Assistance 28. Which title best completes this web diagram? a. Signers of the Declaration of Independence b. Participants in the Boston Massacre c. Heroes of the American Revolution d. Artists of the Colonial Period

10 29. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed... Which person is considered to be the author of this statement? a. George Washington c. Benjamin Franklin b. Thomas Jefferson d. Thomas Paine 30. In 1787, Congress awarded John Paul Jones the Congressional Gold Medal in honor of his valor and brilliant services during the Revolutionary War. Which accomplishment was Congress recognizing? a. Leading the evacuation of Washington D.C., during the British invasion b. Preparing the strategy for the American victory at Yorktown c. Persuading France to provide military assistance to the Continental army d. Commanding victory at sea against the British navy 35. According to the Declaration of Independence, the main purpose of government is to -- a. protect the rights of individuals. b. provide strong military leadership. c. protect a nation from foreign invasions. d. ensure the stability of a country s economy. 36. The Battle of Saratoga was a turning point in the American Revolution because a. the colonists were defeated and lost possession of New York. b. Native Americans joined the war against the colonies during the battle. c. the colonial victory convinced France to support American independence. d. Great Britain was forced to form an alliance with France against the colonies. 31. We, reposing special trust and confidence in your patriotism, valor, conduct, and fidelity, do by these presents, constitute and appoint you to be General and Commander in chief, of the army of the United Colonies, and of all the forces now raised, or to be raised, by them, and of all others who shall voluntarily offer their service... - Commission from the Continental Congress, June 17, 1775 The Continental Congress issued this commission to - a. Thomas Jefferson c. Thomas Paine b. Alexander Hamilton d. George Washington 37. The Treaty of Paris of a. was a blueprint for a new American government. b. took away the rights of Americans in England. c. formally ended the Revolutionary War. d. began the American Revolution. 38. Which was the last major battle of the American Revolution? a. Valley Forge c. Concord b. Saratoga d. Yorktown 32. I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death! This statement was made at the Second Continental Congress by the great orator -- a. Thomas Jefferson c. Thomas Paine b. Patrick Henry d. Samuel Adams 33. What role did Benjamin Franklin play during the American Revolution? a. He discovered electricity. b. He tried to convince the Americans to stop fighting. c. He urged the French to enter the war on the side of the Americans. d. He wrote the Declaration of Independence. 34. Which document included the idea first suggested by John Locke that people have a right to overthrow a government that oppresses them? a. Mayflower Compact c. Fundamental Orders of Connecticut b. Declaration of Independence d. Proclamation of The first gunshot fired at the battle between British troops and colonial Minute Men at Lexington is often referred to as the shot heard round the world because it -- a. caused the first death in the Revolutionary War. b. marked the beginning of the Revolutionary War. c. encouraged other colonies to enter the battle. d. drew the support of Biritish citizens.

11 4. Colonists not allowed to speak out against the King. How was this addressed in the U.S. Constitution? a. 1st Amendment c. 2nd Amendment b. 3rd Amendment d. 4th Amendment 5. Why did some people oppose ratification of the Constitution? a. They believed that it did not provide enough guarantees of individual rights. b. They believed that it did not create a strong enough national government. c. They believed that it did not solve the problems created by the Articles of Confederation. d. They wanted more power to go to the Executive. Which area on the map did the United States acquire through the Treaty of Paris of 1783? a. Area 1 c. Area 3 b. Area 2 d. Area 4 6. How many branches of federal government were specified under the Articles of Confederation, the laws adopted by the Continental Congress in 1777 to govern the United States? a. three legislative, judicial, and executive b. two legislative and executive only c. one executive only d. one legislative only Establishing a New Government Exam 1. Why was the Northwest Ordinance an important law? a. It established the procedure for territories to become states. b. It eastablished the rules for the settlement of the rest of the West. c. All of the above d. It made sure the settlement of the West was orderly. 7. In 1787 the United States was at a crossroads. farmers in western Massachusetts had rebelled the year before over property taxes. The state struggled to end the rebellion. Events such as this one contributed to the decision to -- a. restructure the federal government. b. sign the Treaty of Paris. c. repeal the Intolerable Acts. d. declare an embargo on imported goods. 2. The first three words of the U.S. Constitution, We the people, express the idea of popular sovereignty. Popular sovereignty is the belief that the people hold the -- a. authority to break laws established for the common good. b. power to elect the president directly. c. power to elect judges to the U.S. Supreme Court. d. final authority in government. 3. That all power is vested in, and consequently derived from, the people... Virginia Declaration of Rights, It can be concluded form the excerpt above that in Virginia the citizens -- a. are the source of the government s authority. b. must perform jury duty once a year. c. must uphold the separation of church and state. d. are required to serve in the military. Federalism is best defined as a principle of government that --

12 a. allows the states to nullify national laws. b. divides power between the central government and state governments. c. includes a system of checks and balances. d. places the most power in the hands of the legislative branch. 9. The U.S. Constitution maintains a republican system of government through the -- a. election of representatives who make laws. b. impeachment of the president. c. appointment of federal judges to life terms. d. creation of a presidential cabinet. 10. The following box contains examples of what principle of the Constitution? The president may veto laws made by Congress. Congress may impeach the president. The Supreme Court may rule a law unconstitutional. a. separation of powers c. checks and balances b. republicanism d. popular sovereignty The Constitution sets up for a strong central government with separated powers and a system of checks and balances. Based on this statement, the Constitution was influenced by which historical document? a. Anti-Federalists Writings c. Mayflower Compact b. English Bill of Rights d. Federalist Papers 16. King has absolute power. How was this addressed in the U.S. Constitution? a. Congress has equal representation in the Senate. b. The House of Representatives is based on state population. c. The Judicial Branch interprets and applies the laws d. Congress has power to override Presidential Veto 11. In 1787 many of the delegates to the Constitutional Convention opposed ratification of the U.S. Constitution because of its failure to -- a. reduce states rights. b. establish a foreign-trade policy. c. eliminate slavery. d. include a bill of rights. 12. In 1787 James Madison and other Federalists supported a written plan for a new government. This plan -- a. called for stricter interpretation of the law. b. made changing laws virtually impossible. c. called for a stronger national government. d. created a parliamentary government. Which important principle of the U.S. government is reflected in the diagram? a. popular sovereignty c. individual rights b. federalism d. separation of powers 18. When the Constitution was ratified, the first ten amendments, Bill of Rights, were immediately added to protect those rights. What historical document influenced the statement above? a. Anti-Federalists Writings c. Federalist Papers b. Mayflower Compact d. Magna Carta 13. Building support for the ratification of the United States Constitution was the purpose of -- a. Magna Carta. c. Federalist Papers. b. Albany Pan of Union. d. Mayflower Compact. 14. The Constitution limits the power of the national (federal) government. What historical document influenced the framers to limit the power of those in authority? a. Mayflower Compact c. English Bill of Rights b. Magna Carta d. Federalist Papers

13 d. It was a failure and was eventually replaced by the Constitution Under the Articles of Confederation, Congress was denied the above-listed powers because the -- a. courts were responsible for regulating business activity. b. citizens lacked interest in business matters. c. citizens feared a strong central government. d. courts were given absolute authority The first three articles of the U.S. Constitution reflect the principle of -- a. separation of powers. c. federalism. b. individual rights. d. popular sovereignty. Which of the following best completes the diagram? a. Jurisdiction of the U.S. Supreme Cout b. Amendment of the U.S. Constitution c. Regulation of interstate commerce d. Election of the president 21. The Constitution attempted to achieve a certain balance. What were the two ideas it tried to balance? a. The rights of the individual on the one hand, and the power of the government on the other. b. The rights of slaves on the one hand, and the needs of southern slave owners on the other. c. The power of the majority on the one hand, and the needs of the government on the other. d. The rights of property holders on the one hand, and the power of the government on the other. 33. What was the outcome of the Articles of Confederation? a. It established the Confederate States of America. b. It was a success and became the basis for American government. c. It became the model for governments in Europe. How did the delegates to the Constitutional Convention settle the issue described above? a. Three-Fifths Compromise b. Virginia Plan c. New Jersey Plan d. Mason-Dixon line 24. Which plan of government offered at the Philadelphia Convention would small states probably support? a. The Virginia plan because larger states would have more power in Congress. b. The Virginia plan because it said that representation in congress would be based on a states population. c. The New Jersey plan because it allowed each state equal representation in Congress. d. The New Jersey plan because it said that there should be two houses of Congress.

14 The nation deserves and I will select a Supreme Court justice that Americans can be proud of. The nation also deserves a dignified process of confirmation in the United States Senate, characterized by fair treatment, a fair hearing and a fair vote. I will choose a nominee in a timely manner so that the hearing and the vote can be completed before the new Supreme Court term begins.... President George W. Bush, 2005 Which constitutional principle is suggested by this quotation? a. checks and balances c. states rights b. due process d. federalism 26. This document was a model for the individual liberties written in the Constitution? a. English Bill of Rights c. Magna Carta b. Federalist Papers d. Anti-Federalists Writings a. The First Continental Congress occurred at this convention. b. The Articles of Confederation was written at this convention. c. The Constitution was written at this convention. d. America declared its independence at this convention. 27. One accomplishment of the national government under the Articles of Confederation was the passage of legislation establishing -- a. a process for admitting new states to the Union. b. the president s right to put down rebellions. c. a central banking system. d. the ability of Congress to tax the states effectively. 28. After the end of the Revolutionary War, states were eager to expand into newly available territory. The states of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Virginia argued over competing claims west of the Appalachian Mountains. This conflict was addressed by the -- a. Mayflower Compact c. Declaration of Independence b. Northwest Ordinance d. Albany Plan of Union 29. Quartering Act forced colonists to house troops. How was this addressed in the U.S. Constitution? a. 4th Amendment c. 5th Amendment b. 1st Amendment d. 3rd Amendment 34. The Great Compromise reached at the Constitutional Convention resulted in the -- a. ban on the importation of enslaved Africans. b. formation of the Supreme Court. c. creation of a bicameral legislature. d. development of a two-party system. 35. The opponents of the Constitution were called -- a. Republicans. c. Federalists. b. Anti-Federalists. d. Whigs. 36. What is the significance of the Philadelphia Convention of 1787? Which idea best completes this diagram? a. Representation based on a state s population b. Representation by presidential appointment c. Representation with term limits d. Representation based on a state s date of admission 31. A major reason the Anti-Federalists opposed the ratification of the United States Constitution was because the Constitution -- a. created a national bank. b. failed to provide for the direct election of members of the House of Representatives. c. lacked a provision for a federal court system. d. changed the balance of power between the state and national governments. What would be the best title for the diagram above? a. A plan for Representative Government b. The importance of the Divine Right of Kings c. Constitutional Monarchy in the United States d. The policy of Mercantilism

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