Constitution Practice Quiz

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1 1 Which action illustrates the concept of checks and balances? (1) President Harry Truman issuing an executive order to desegregate the military (2) Congress overriding President Richard Nixon s veto of the War Powers Act (3) the House of Representatives Ethics Committee reviewing members financial records (4) President Jimmy Carter selecting Walter Mondale as his vice presidential running mate 2 At the Constitutional Convention (1787), which issue was resolved by the Great Compromise? (1) method of electing the president (2) power of Congress to tax exports (3) regulation of interstate commerce (4) representation of states in Congress 3 In the United States Constitution, the power to impeach a federal government official is given to the (1) House of Representatives (2) president (3) state legislatures (4) Supreme Court 4 The United States Constitution provides that federal judges be appointed for life primarily to (1) protect judicial decision-making from the influence of political pressure (2) provide time for a more thorough investigation of cases (3) ensure that judicial decisions are based on precedent (4) guarantee that different viewpoints are represented on the Supreme Court 5 Which action would be considered an example of the use of the unwritten constitution? (1) ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920 (2) declaration of war against Japan in 1941 (3) passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (4) cabinet meeting called by President Bill Clinton in Base your answer to question on the chart below and on your knowledge of social studies. Which constitutional principle is best illustrated by the chart? (1) federalism (2) implied powers (3) due process (4) property rights 7 Base your answer to the following question on the quotation below and on your knowledge of social studies.... The nation deserves and I will select a Supreme Court justice that Americans can be proud of. The nation also deserves a dignified process of confirmation in the United States Senate, characterized by fair treatment, a fair hearing and a fair vote. I will choose a nominee in a timely manner so that the hearing and the vote can be completed before the new Supreme Court term begins.... President George W. Bush, 2005 Which constitutional principle is suggested by this quotation? (1) federalism (2) checks and balances (3) States rights (4) due process

2 8 Base your answer to the following question on the quotation below and on your knowledge of social studies.... He [the President] shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to make treaties, provided two thirds of the senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the Supreme Court, and all other officers of the United States, whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law: but the Congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of departments. Article II, Section 2, Clause 2, Constitution of the United States This portion of the Constitution illustrates the principle of (1) checks and balances (2) executive privilege (3) judicial review (4) implied powers 9 The primary purpose of the Articles of Confederation was to (1) provide tax revenues for the national government (2) establish the basic framework of the national government (3) give the national government the power to regulate interstate commerce (4) establish the supremacy of the national government over the states 10 Which provision of the Bill of Rights was influenced by the trial of John Peter Zenger? (1) right to bear arms (2) right to an attorney (3) freedom of religion (4) freedom of the press 11 A major criticism of the electoral college is that it (1) limits the influence of the two-party political system (2) allows a president to be elected without a majority of the popular vote (3) forces each political candidate to campaign in every state (4) makes the federal election process too expensive 12 What was one effect of the Three-fifths Compromise? (1) Slave states gained additional congressional representation. (2) The number of justices on the Supreme Court was established. (3) Presidential appointments were assumed easy confirmation. (4) A two-house legislature was created. 13 Federalism, separation of powers, and checks and balances are constitutional principles that directly (1) empower more voters (2) restrict individual liberties (3) involve citizens in the governing process (4) reduce the concentration of governmental power 14 Base your answer on the passages below and on your knowledge of social studies. Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom and independence, and every power, jurisdiction and right, which is not by this confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled.. Article II, Articles of Confederation The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people. 10th amendment, United States Constitution The purpose of each of these provisions is to (1) determine the division of power between state and central governments (2) create a process for allowing amendments (3) grant the central government power to control the states (4) limit the power of the executive branch 15 At the Constitutional Convention of 1787, supporters of the Virginia plan and supporters of the New Jersey plan differed over the method for (1) determining congressional representation (2) selecting the president's cabinet (3) adopting the amendment process (4) giving powers to the executive branch

3 16 Base your answer to the following question on the map below and on your knowledge of social studies. Based on this map, the proposed equal rights amendment was not added to the Constitution because (1) too few New England states supported it (2) fewer than three-fourths of the states ratified it (3) the president vetoed the passage of the amendment (4) Idaho, Nebraska, and Kentucky never held a ratification vote 17 At the Constitutional Convention of 1787, the Great Compromise between the large states and the small states resulted in (1) the creation of a bicameral legislature (2) a provision for equal protection of the laws (3) a permanent solution to the slavery issue (4) the guarantee of voting rights for all male property owners 18 To provide for change, the authors of the United States Constitution included the amendment process and the (1) commerce clause (2) elastic clause (3) supremacy clause (4) naturalization clause 19 Judicial review is most accurately described as the power of the (1) president to override a decision of the Supreme Court (2) state courts to overturn decisions of the Supreme Court (3) Senate to approve all presidential appointments to federal courts (4) Supreme Court to determine the constitutionality of laws 20 One weakness of the Articles of Confederation was the inability of the central government to (1) establish a postal system (2) collect adequate taxes from the states (3) control western lands (4) admit new states to the Union

4 21 "The United States shall guarantee to every state in this Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion; and application of the legislature, or of the executive (when the legislature cannot be convened), against domestic violence. United States Constitution, Article IV, Section 4 According to this excerpt, a goal of the framers of Constitution was to ensure that the United States (1) remained neutral during domestic conflicts involving the states (2) supported the right of each state to resist presidential decisions (3) provided for the common defense of every state (4) approved a bill of rights to protect citizens from government tyranny 22 Which heading best completes the partial outline below? (1) Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation (2) Strengths of the Continental Congress (3) Provisions of the United States Constitution (4) Influence of Treaties with European Governments 23 Which major issue was debated at the Constitutional Convention in 1787 and contributed directly to the start of the Civil War? (1) regulation of interstate commerce (2) setting of qualifications for federal office holders (3) length of presidential term of office (4) balance of power between the states and the national government 24 To win a presidential election, a candidate must win a (1) two-thirds vote of the state legislatures (2) two-thirds vote in Congress (3) majority of the popular vote (4) majority of the electoral college vote 25 The primary purpose of the Articles of Confederation was to (1) provide revenues for the national government (2) establish the basic framework of the national government (3) give the national government the power to regulate interstate commerce (4) guarantee a bill of rights to protect citizens from the national government 26 "The enumeration [listing] in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed [interpreted] to deny or disparage [weaken] others retained by the people." 9th Amendment to the United States Constitution The most likely reason this amendment was included in the Bill of Rights was to (1) increase federal power over the people (2) expand state control over individual citizens (3) protect rights beyond those listed in the Constitution (4) prevent Congress from granting additional rights to individuals 27 To prevent tyranny, the authors of the Constitution drew on Montesquieu's concept of (1) religious liberty (2) universal suffrage (3) separation of powers (4) supremacy of the nobility 28 "I believe that our young people [18 20 years old] possess a great social conscience, are perplexed by the injustices which exist in the world and are anxious to rectify [correct] these ills." Senator Jennings Randolph, 1971, The New York Times Those who favor this point of view would likely have supported (1) a constitutional amendment extending voting rights (2) a presidential decision to raise speed limits (3) a Supreme Court ruling to reverse desegregation (4) a law passed by Congress to increase Social Security benefits

5 29 The United States Constitution grants the Senate the power to (1) impeach governors (2) issue pardons (3) appoint ambassadors (4) approve treaties 30 Which principle of government is found in both the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution of the United States? (1) The right to vote must be guaranteed to all Americans. (2) Supreme Court justices should be elected by the people. (3) Governing power should be divided between different levels of government. (4) States have the right to secede from the Union. 31 The decisions of the Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Marshall and under Chief Justice Earl Warren demonstrate that (1) the Supreme Court can greatly influence economic and social change (2) chief justices have little influence over the rest of the Supreme Court (3) Supreme Court decisions must be approved by the president (4) states can overturn decisions of the Supreme Court 32 "Senate Rejects Supreme Court Nominee" "Supreme Court Declares National Recovery Act (NRA) Unconstitutional" "Congress Overrides Truman Veto of Taft-Hartley Act" Each of these headlines illustrates the use of (1) reserved powers (2) checks and balances (3) executive privilege (4) federal supremacy 33 What was a result of the Great Compromise during the Constitutional Convention of 1787? (1) creating a two-house legislature (2) banning slavery in Southern states (3) requiring that the president have a cabinet (4) giving the Supreme Court the power to hear cases involving states Base your answers to questions 34 and 35 on the speakers' statements below and on your knowledge of social studies. Speaker A: As it stands now, the Constitution does not protect civil liberties. Speaker B: The system of checks and balances will control any abuse of power by a branch of government. Speaker C: The demands of the majority will overwhelm the minority. Speaker D: The amendment process will allow the Constitution to be changed when the need arises. 34 How was the concern of Speaker A resolved? (1) adoption of the elastic clause (2) establishment of the House of Representatives (3) creation of the federal court system (4) addition of the Bill of Rights 35 Which two speakers support the ratification of the Constitution? (1) A and D (2) A and C (3) B and D (4) B and C 36 "...We should consider that we are providing a Constitution for future generations, and not merely for the peculiar circumstances of the moment...." James Wilson, Constitutional Convention, 1787 The writers of the Constitution best applied this idea by providing for (1) an electoral college to select the president (2) due process of law to protect individual civil rights (3) a method for adopting a constitutional amendment (4) the direct election of members of Congress 37..."We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal;..." Seneca Falls Convention, 1848 Which document most influenced the authors of this statement? (1) Mayflower Compact (2) Albany Plan of Union (3) Declaration of Independence (4) Articles of Confederation

6 38 "... Article 6. There shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the said territory, otherwise than in the punishment of crimes whereof the party shall have been duly convicted: Provided, always, That any person escaping into the same, from whom labor or service is lawfully claimed in any one of the original States, such fugitive may be lawfully reclaimed and conveyed to the person claiming his or her labor or service as aforesaid..." Northwest Ordinance, 1787 Based on this excerpt from the Northwest Ordinance, which statement is a valid conclusion? (1) The issue of slavery was largely ignored before the Civil War. (2) Abolitionists had gained control of the Constitutional Convention. (3) Slavery was legally banned in the Northwest Territory. (4) Enslaved persons had constitutionally protected civil rights. 39 The Supreme Court decision in Marbury v. Madison (1803) was important because it (1) established the principle of judicial review (2) led to the reelection of President Thomas Jefferson (3) showed that the states were stronger than the federal government (4) proved that the legislative branch was the most powerful branch of government 40 The United States and New York State constitutions establish republican forms of government because each provides for (1) a standing army (2) elected representatives (3) control over the money supply (4) a system of implied powers 41 At the Constitutional Convention of 1787, the Great Compromise and the Three-fifths Compromise both involved the issue of how (1) new states would be created (2) states would be represented in the national government (3) the armed forces would be controlled (4) presidential elections would be conducted 42 Critics of the Articles of Confederation argued that it (1) imposed unfair taxes on the states (2) used a draft to raise a national army (3) provided a strong system of federal courts (4) placed too much power in the hands of the states 43 The years between the end of the American Revolution and the ratification of the Constitution are sometimes called the critical period because (1) the western territories were left ungoverned (2) the United States fought a war with France (3) Spain refused to sell Florida to the United States (4) the central government failed to solve many economic problems 44 Base your answer on the passage below and on your knowledge of social studies....no political truth is certainly of greater intrinsic [essential] value, or is stamped with the authority of more enlightened patrons of liberty, than that on which the objection is founded. The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive, and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny... James Madison, The Federalist, Number 47 Which constitutional principle was established to protect American citizens from the tyranny suggested in this quotation? (1) due process of law (2) States rights (3) popular sovereignty (4) separation of powers 45 "President Wilson Represents the United States at Versailles" "President Reagan Meets with Soviet President Gorbachev" "President Carter Negotiates Camp David Accords" Each headline illustrates a time when the president of the United States acted as (1) chief diplomat (2) chief legislator (3) commander in chief (4) head of a political party

7 46 "All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives;..." - Article 1, Section 7, United States Constitution The main reason the writers of the Constitution included this provision was to (1) give citizens more influence over taxation issues (2) assure that all citizens would pay taxes (3) deny presidents the power to veto revenue bills (4) provide the government with a balanced budget 47 In New York Times v. United States (1971) and United States v. Nixon (1974), the Supreme Court placed limits on the (1) authority of federal judges (2) exercise of freedom of religion (3) powers of the president (4) right of Congress to declare war 48 The framework of government described in the Constitution of the United States (1787) most clearly shows the dissatisfaction of the founders with the (1) Albany Plan of Union (2) Northwest Ordinance (3) Articles of Confederation (4) Treaty of Paris Base your answers to questions 49 and 50 on the speakers statements below and on your knowledge of social studies. Speaker A: Our national government should be strong. State governments should have only limited powers. Speaker B: A bicameral legislature would protect the power of both the large states and the small states. Speaker C: The expansion of the national government will lead to tyranny. Speaker D: The executive branch should have significant power. 49 Which speaker is expressing an idea that was included in the Great Compromise during the drafting of the Constitution in 1787? (1) A (2) B (3) C (4) D 50 During the debate over ratification of the Constitution, people who agreed with the statements of Speakers A and D became known as (1) Loyalists (2) Federalists (3) Antifederalists (4) Democratic Republicans 51 The Preamble of the Constitution demonstrates that the writers believed that sovereignty belongs to the (1) federal government (2) state governments (3) president (4) people 52 Which issue did the Virginia Plan, the New Jersey Plan, and the Great Compromise address at the Constitutional Convention (1787)? (1) the power to regulate interstate commerce (2) the number of justices on the Supreme Court (3) a system for electing the president (4) a method of determining state representation in Congress 53 What was the primary objection of the Antifederalists to ratification of the Constitution? (1) They opposed a bicameral legislature. (2) They believed the rights of the people were not protected. (3) They feared a weak central government. (4) They wanted to give more power to the executive branch. 54 During the debate over ratification of the United States Constitution, Antifederalists argued that a bill of rights should be added to (1) preserve the interests of slaveholders (2) list the responsibilities of citizens (3) protect individual liberties (4) ensure federal supremacy 55 The term federalism is best defined as (1) the process of amending a constitution (2) the power of the courts to determine the constitutionality of laws (3) a republican form of government with no hereditary ruler (4) the division of power between the states and the national government

8 56 Which power regarding the federal judiciary was established in Marbury v. Madison? (1) The president appoints all federal judges. (2) The Congress creates lower federal courts. (3) Members of the federal courts serve life terms. (4) Federal laws may be declared unconstitutional. 57 Which headline is reporting the clearest example of the United States Constitution's system of checks and balances? (1) "Environmental Protection Agency Proposes Stricter Air Pollution Controls" (2) "Supreme Court Rules on Arizona Immigration Law" (3) "President Vetoes Defense Spending Bill" (4) "California Passes Strict Gun Control Law" 58 Under the Articles of Confederation, the years between 1781 and 1787 are often referred to as the critical period because the (1) colonies were forced to pay high reparations to England (2) states were fighting the French and Indian War (3) southern states threatened to secede from the Union over the issue of slavery (4) central government lacked the power to deal with major problems 59 "...That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed,... " Declaration of Independence Which provision of the original United States Constitution was most influenced by this ideal? (1) enabling the president to select a cabinet (2) providing for direct election of the House of Representatives (3) allowing the Senate to try articles of impeachment (4) authorizing the Supreme Court to rule on disputes between states 60 Judicial review allows the Supreme Court to (1) determine the constitutionality of federal laws (2) approve nominations to the president's cabinet (3) oversee the financing of the lower federal courts (4) remove elected officials from office 61 The case of Marbury v. Madison (1803) established the principle that (1) the Supreme Court can declare federal laws unconstitutional (2) the states have power over the federal government (3) the president nominates federal judges (4) Congress can override presidential vetoes 62 The amendment process was included in the Constitution to (1) allow for change over time (2) expand the powers of the president (3) increase citizen participation in government (4) limit the authority of the United States Supreme Court 63 President Jimmy Carter's decision to criticize South Africa's apartheid policy and President Bill Clinton's decision to send troops to Bosnia were both responses to (1) human rights abuses (2) civil wars (3) immigration policies (4) trade agreement violations 64 Which issue was involved in both the firing of General Douglas MacArthur in 1951 and the passage of the War Powers Act of 1973? (1) judicial limits on free speech (2) media influence on budget policies (3) the president s authority as commander in chief (4) expansion of the military-industrial complex 65 What is the first step in adding an amendment to the United States Constitution? (1) approval by the president (2) review by the Supreme Court (3) vote by the people in a national referendum (4) passage by a two-thirds majority in both houses of Congress 66 According to the Constitution, the president is required to (1) sign or veto bills passed by Congress (2) establish income tax rates (3) review Supreme Court decisions (4) raise money for political parties

9 67 Base your answer to the question on the cartoon below and on your knowledge of social studies. Which constitutional principle is the focus of this cartoon? (1) individual liberties (2) separation of powers (3) freedom of speech (4) federalism 68 Antifederalists opposed ratification of the United States Constitution until they were assured that (1) a bill of rights would be added to the original document (2) their supporters would receive a fair share of federal government jobs (3) the president would be given increased powers (4) senators would be elected directly by the people 69 Which statement about the United States House of Representatives is accurate? (1) Representatives are chosen by the legislatures of their states. (2) The Constitution allows each state two representatives. (3) The number of representatives from each state is based on its population. (4) The political party of the president always holds a majority of House seats. 70 Base your answer on the passage below and on your knowledge of social studies. Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. First amendment, United States Constitution What is one impact of this amendment on American society? (1) Congress cannot mandate a national religion. (2) Religious groups cannot lobby Congress. (3) Members of the press cannot hold public office. (4) The Supreme Court cannot limit free speech during wartime.

10 71 Base your answer on the poster below and on your knowledge of social studies. This 1863 poster is recruiting African Americans to help (1) defeat the Confederacy in the Civil War (2) assist in the efforts of the Underground Railroad (3) settle land in the south and in border states (4) enforce the terms of the Fugitive Slave Act 72 What was a major demand of the Antifederalists during the debate over ratification of the United States Constitution? (1) continuation of slavery (2) right to habeas corpus (3) inclusion of a bill of rights (4) reduction in the number of representatives in Congress 73 Which action can be taken by the United States Supreme Court to illustrate the concept that the Constitution is the supreme law of the land? (1) hiring new federal judges (2) voting articles of impeachment (3) declaring a state law unconstitutional (4) rejecting a presidential nomination to the cabinet 74 A constitutional power specifically delegated to the federal government is the power to (1) regulate marriage and divorce (2) establish education standards (3) declare war (4) issue driver s licenses

11 75 Base your answer to question on the excerpts from the United States Constitution below and on your knowledge of social studies. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public safety may require it. Article I, Section 9... and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. Amendment IV Which basic constitutional concept is illustrated by each of these provisions? (1) balancing individual liberty and the need for order in society (2) dividing power between the Senate and the House of Representatives (3) guaranteeing equal treatment of minority groups (4) providing flexibility to meet changing needs through the elastic clause 76 The Three-fifths Compromise adopted in the Constitution in 1787 had the effect of (1) increasing the representation of southern states in Congress (2) providing a method for ratifying amendments (3) making possible the impeachment of the president (4) allowing the use of the elastic clause in the legislative process 77 What was the main reason the Federalists wanted to replace the Articles of Confederation? (1) The president did not have the power to veto legislation. (2) The legislative branch enacted an unfair tax program. (3) The Supreme Court refused to pay Revolutionary War debts. (4) The national government was too weak to solve the nation's problems. 78 Federalism is best defined as a principle of government that (1) divides power between the central government and state governments (2) includes a system of checks and balances (3) allows the states to nullify national laws (4) places the most power in the hands of the legislative branch 79 The United States Constitution requires that a national census be taken every ten years to (1) provide the government with information about voter registration (2) establish a standard for setting income tax rates (3) determine the number of members each state has in the House of Representatives (4) decide who can vote in presidential elections 80 What is the most democratic feature of the original Constitution of the United States? (1) role given to the electoral college in presidential elections (2) appointment of ambassadors by the president (3) direct election of the members of the House of Representatives (4) lifetime appointments for Supreme Court justices 81 The Federalist Papers, written by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, were intended to (1) promote independence from Great Britain (2) persuade voters to keep the Articles of Confederation (3) win support for ratification of the Constitution (4) endorse candidates running for Congress 82 What was the major argument of those who opposed ratification of the United States Constitution? (1) That states should not be forced to pay taxes to the federal government. (2) The new consitituion did not adequately protect individual liberties against abuse by the federal government. (3) The judicial branch was granted more power than the legislative and executive branches. (4) The federal government did not have enough power to defend the nation against foreign enemies.

12 83 "Congress Passes Alien and Sedition Acts" "Lincoln Suspends Writ of Habeas Corpus" "Roosevelt Authorizes Internment of Japanese Americans on West Coast" Which conclusion is best supported by these headlines? (1) Immigrants are a danger to the welfare of the United States. (2) Perceived threats to national security sometimes result in limits on civil liberties. (3) Foreign policy is greatly affected by domestic conflicts. (4) The power of the federal government is weakened by risks to national security. 84 A primary reason the Antifederalists opposed ratification of the United States Constitution in 1787 was because the Constitution failed to (1) indude a bill of rights (2) provide for a strong national defense (3) restrict immigration (4) extend voting rights to Women 85 "Congress Passes Alien and Sedition Acts'' "Lincoln Suspends Habeas Corpus'' "Wilson Signs 1918 Sedition Act" These headlines show that the federal government can (1) restrict citizens' rights in times of crisis (2) raise armies without informing the public (3) station troops in a person's home at any time (4) require citizens to be witnesses against themselves 86 A bill of rights should be added. The central government is too powerful. The nation is too large to remain a republic. These statements express concerns of citizens who opposed the (1) colonial rule of Great Britain (2) principles expressed in the Albany Plan of Union (3) ratification of the Constitution (4) secession of Southern states from the Union 87 Base your answer to question on the passage below and on your knowledge of social studies.... We the General Assembly of Virginia do enact, that no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious Worship place or Ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened [burdened] in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief, but that all men shall be free to profess, and by arguments to maintain their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise [way] diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities... Virginia General Assembly, 1779 The principle expressed in this proposed law was also contained in the (1) Zenger case decision (2) Albany Plan of Union (3) First amendment (4) Alien and Sedition Acts 88 Which statement most accurately describes federalism? (1) The judicial branch of government has more power than the other two branches. (2) The president and vice president divide executive power. (3) Power is divided between the national government and the states. (4) Power is shared between the two houses of Congress. 89 The United States Congress can check the executive branch of government by (1) appointing ambassadors (2) overriding vetoes (3) nominating judges (4) declaring laws unconstitutional 90 Many Antifederalists opposed ratification of the Constitution until they were guaranteed (1) better protection of individual liberties (2) increased presidential authority to wage war (3) stricter control over state spending (4) expanded police powers

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