The United States Constitution. The Supreme Law of the Land

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "The United States Constitution. The Supreme Law of the Land"

Transcription

1 The United States Constitution The Supreme Law of the Land

2 Standards SSUSH5 The student will explain specific events and key ideas that brought about the adoption and implementation of the United States Constitution. a. Explain how weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation and Daniel Shays Rebellion led to a call for a stronger central government. b. Evaluate the major arguments of the anti-federalists and Federalists during the debate on ratification of the Constitution as put forth in The Federalist concerning form of government, factions, checks and balances, and the power of the executive, including the roles of Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. c. Explain the key features of the Constitution, specifically the Great Compromise, separation of powers (influence of Montesquieu), limited government, and the issue of slavery. d. Analyze how the Bill of Rights serves as a protector of individual and states rights. e. Explain the importance of the Presidencies of George Washington and John Adams; include the Whiskey Rebellion, non-intervention in Europe, and the development of political parties (Alexander Hamilton).

3 Confederation v. Federation Confederation: A confederation is an association of sovereign member states, that by treaty have delegated certain of their competences to common institutions, in order to coordinate their policies in a number of areas, without constituting a new state on top of the member states

4 Confederation v. Federation Federation: a type of sovereign state characterized by a union of partially self-governing states or regions united by a central (federal) government.

5 Introductory Video America Gets a Constitution

6 The Articles of Confederation After independence, states chose how they were to carry out a their own republican form of government 1777 Continental Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation (Ratified 1781) Some powers granted to central government but MOST were left up to individual states

7 Problems with the Articles Federal gov t could declare war and other foreign affairs Federal gov t have no power to collect taxes, relying only on contributions from states Resolving MAJOR issues required 2/3 of the states to approve (9 total) Any amendments to the Articles took the approval of all 13 states

8 Governing Western Lands In the Land Ordinance of 1785 Congress laid out plans for peacefully settling Western land ceded from France in the 1763 Treaty of Paris. The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 Outlined the steps for a territory to apply for statehood. Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and parts of Minnesota BANNED SLAVERY in these territories Led to increased interaction with Natives; broke the promise of the Proclamation of 1763 Called for establishment of free public schools

9

10 Shay's Rebellion (Massachusetts, ) The wealthy investors that had paid for the Revolution wanted their money back. The states raised taxes to pay the debt. Poor farmers rioted in protest of the raised taxes. (Led by Daniel Shay) Massachusetts didn t have the money to raise an army to stop the riots. Congress didn t have the power to tax to raise a national army to stop the riot

11 Effects of Shay s Rebellion People would defy any government that acted against their wishes. It showed America that the federal government had to be strengthened to avoid civil unrest. Forced Americans to reevaluate the strength of a confederation and move to a stronger central government Shay s Rebellion showed the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation

12 Constitutional Convention, 1787

13 Meeting in Philadelphia, 1787 Spring/Summer 1787, leaders from 12 states (all except Rhode Island) met in Philadelphia at Independence Hall to REVISE the Articles of Confederation Elected George Washington as president of the convention

14 Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists Two different groups emerged from the debate over whether to revise the Articles or create a brand new Constitution Federalists favored a strong central government (John Adams, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton) Antifederalists- favored states and individual rights, feared a strong central government would lead to tyranny (Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Adams, Patrick Henry)

15 James Madison Rival to Hamilton at the Convention Father of the Constitution Believed a large republic with diverse interests would preserve the common good

16 Alexander Hamilton Rival to Madison at Convention Favored government ruled by aristocracy and monarchy Looked out for the interests of businessmen and the wealthy

17 Rival Plans of Government Delegates debated how best to distribute representatives to the new Congress for each state Virginia Plan proposed by Madison; bicameral (two house) legislature with larger populated states having more members New Jersey Plan would retain unicameral (one house) legislature and all states have EQUAL number of members

18 The Great Compromise Introduced by Roger Sherman Proposed bicameral legislature to appease both sides Senate EQUAL representation; 2 per state House of Representatives based on population Also divided power between federal and state governments (system known as Federalism)

19 Slavery and the Three-Fifths Compromise Debate sparked between Northern and Southern delegates South feared domination by North, which had far more free peoples South feared that the institution of slavery would be in jeopardy All knew that the issue of slavery could tear apart the newly formed country

20 Slavery and the Three-Fifths Compromise 1st Constitution forbade Congress from blocking the importation of slaves for 20 years (until 1808). 2nd 3 out of every 5 slaves could be counted in allocating state representation 3rd All states required to return fugitive slaves to their owners

21 Ratifying the Constitution Founding Fathers decided that ratification by only 9 states would be enough to put into law the new Constitution The Federalist Papers series of essays written by Hamilton, Madison and John Jay (right) promoting the views of the Federalist faction Still many states were Anti- Federalist and refused to ratify

22 Bill of Rights Only after many state conventions were promised an individual Bill of Rights did they ratify the Constitution. Bill of Rights first 10 Amendments; composed by James Madison Intended to protect individuals from a strong central government and give them certain specified rights Included freedom of religion, petition, assembly, the press, legal rights, right to bear arms, etc.

23 The Bill of Rights 1. Freedoms of Speech, Assembly, Religion, Press, petition for redress of grievances 2. Right to bear arms 3. No quartering act 4. Privacy, search and seizure 5. Due process, double jeopardy, self incrimination 6. Speedy, public trial 7. Trial by jury 8. Prohibits cruel and unusual punishment 9. Rights not specifically mentioned are also protected 10. All powers not delegated to the Federal government are reserved for the states

24 Principles of New Constitution (AKA words you need to know) Popular sovereignty gov t derives its political authority from the people Limited Government the central gov t has ONLY the powers the Constitution gives it Separation of Powers gov t divided among three branches (legislative, executive and judicial): Montesquieu!

25 Principles of New Constitution (AKA words you need to know) Federalism federal and state gov ts share power Checks and Balances each branch has the power to limit actions of the other two Representative democracy (Republic) citizens elect reps to gov t to make laws Electoral College group of people chosen by each state who directly elect the President

26 President George Washington - #1 Established enduring precedents 2 term tenure Cabinet Proclamation of Neutrality Federal Court System (1789) Creation of 13 circuit (one in each state) and 3 courts of appeals throughout nation Warned about development of political parties

27 Development of Political Parties Alexander Hamilton Hamilton formed the Federalist Party who believed in a very strong central government Federalists pushed to: Increase Federal power Place a high tax on whiskey Sponsor a protective tariff (Tariff of 1789) to pay off debt from Revolution and operate government Sponsored the creation of a national bank

28 Development of Political Parties Thomas Jefferson Jefferson formed the Democratic-Republicans who believed in preserving the power of the states Democratic-Republicans believed: Maintain power among state governments Federalists policies focused on the wealthy at the expense of the common man

29 The Whiskey Rebellion It occurred because of the tax on whiskey. Whiskey was important to western farmers because it was a product of corn that could be shipped east for sale. The poor farmers rebelled against the tax. Washington used the army to put down the rebellion. This demonstrated that the new government was committed to enforcing its laws and that the new Constitution worked.

30 President John Adams - #2 Only Federalist president Presided over: XYZ Affair France tried to interfere with US trade after the US made a trade agreement with Britain France tried to bully the US into a bribe to resume free trade US remained neutral Alien & Sedition Acts Increased the time for citizenship from 5 to 14 years Made it illegal to speak out against or criticize the President or Congress Virginia & Kentucky Resolutions Push by Dem-Republicans for states to nullify federal laws they considered unconstitutional (in response to Sedition Act)

31 TOD, Part 1:COMPARE/CONTRAST CHART Directions: Copy the chart below on a separate sheet of paper. Complete the chart by explaining the stance (feelings) that each party had on the listed issues FEDERALISTS/FEDERALIST PARTY ISSUES 1)GOVERNMENTAL POWER 2) TAXES ANTI-FEDERALISTS/ DEMOCRATIC- REPUBLICAN PARTY 3) LAWS/RULES 4) FOREIGN INTERVENTION

32 TOD Part 2: Explain the significance of 4 of the following to the development of the United States Constitution (1 sentence each) Articles of Confederation Daniel Shay George Washington James Madison Alexander Hamilton Roger Sherman John Jay Thomas Jefferson

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation Articles of Confederation Do Now How is power divided in our country today? SWBAT Analyze government problems under the Articles of Confederation Activity Review the Articles of Confederation chart and

More information

Unit 3 Section 1 Articles and Early Government.notebook. January 18, Vocabulary. Westward Ho! Need for State and National Government

Unit 3 Section 1 Articles and Early Government.notebook. January 18, Vocabulary. Westward Ho! Need for State and National Government 8.1 Vocabulary Wilderness Road Republic Articles of Confederation Land Ordinance of 1785 Northwest Territory Northwest Ordinance Shays's Rebellion Chapter Connection: Articles of Confederation were not

More information

Unit 4 Writing the Constitution Concepts to Review

Unit 4 Writing the Constitution Concepts to Review Unit 4 Writing the Constitution Concepts to Review CAUSE AND EFFECTS OF MAJOR ERAS AND EVENTS IN U.S. HISTORY THROUGH 1877 Writing the Constitution Shays Rebellion Philadelphia Convention 1787 Great Compromise

More information

Chapter 8 Section Review Packet

Chapter 8 Section Review Packet Name: Date: Section 8-1: The Articles of Confederation Chapter 8 Section Review Packet 1. Constitution 2. Republicanism 3. Limited government 4. Suffrage 5. Articles of Confederation 6. Ratification 7.

More information

What types of things did the new states do to make the governments more democratic?

What types of things did the new states do to make the governments more democratic? Chapter 8 Confederation to Constitution pg. 218 241 8 1 The Confederation Era pg. 221 225 Moving West and New State Governments Into which areas did American settlement expand in the late 1700s? What types

More information

Chapter 5, Section 3 Creating the Constitution. Pages

Chapter 5, Section 3 Creating the Constitution. Pages Chapter 5, Section 3 Creating the Constitution Pages 163-168 It didn t take long for people to realize that the Articles of Confederation had many weaknesses. By the mid-1780s most political leaders agreed

More information

Constitutional Convention. May 1787

Constitutional Convention. May 1787 Constitutional Convention May 1787 Annapolis Convention September 11 to September 14, 1786 Annapolis, Maryland Purpose - How to fix the articles of confederation Alexander Hamilton (New York) MUST resolve

More information

Grade 7 History Mr. Norton

Grade 7 History Mr. Norton Grade 7 History Mr. Norton Section 1: A Loose Confederation Section 2: The Constitutional Convention Section 3: Ideas Behind the Constitution Section 4: Ratification and the Bill of Rights Grade 7 History

More information

The Constitution: From Ratification to Amendments. US Government Fall, 2014

The Constitution: From Ratification to Amendments. US Government Fall, 2014 The Constitution: From Ratification to Amendments US Government Fall, 2014 Origins of American Government Colonial Period Where did ideas for government in the colonies come from? Largely, from England

More information

The Critical Period The early years of the American Republic

The Critical Period The early years of the American Republic The Critical Period 1781-1789 The early years of the American Republic America after the War New Political Ideas: - Greater power for the people Republic: Represent the Public America after the War State

More information

FORMING A NEW GOVERNMENT

FORMING A NEW GOVERNMENT FORMING A NEW GOVERNMENT These questions are in random order. They will be in a different order in class tomorrow. Seven Principles Checks & Balances Federalism Individual Rights Limited Government Popular

More information

The States: Experiments in Republicanism State constitutions served as experiments in republican government The people demand written constitutions

The States: Experiments in Republicanism State constitutions served as experiments in republican government The people demand written constitutions The States: Experiments in Republicanism State constitutions served as experiments in republican government The people demand written constitutions provide clear definition of rights describe clear limits

More information

The Articles of Confederation

The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation Explain the weaknesses and strengths of the Articles of Confederation. Examine the need for a strong central government. Document that broke the 12 English colonies from British

More information

AKS M 49 C 30 a-d D 32 a-c D 33 a-c D 34 a-b BUILDING A NEW NATION

AKS M 49 C 30 a-d D 32 a-c D 33 a-c D 34 a-b BUILDING A NEW NATION AKS M 49 C 30 a-d D 32 a-c D 33 a-c D 34 a-b BUILDING A NEW NATION The official end of the Revolutionary War was the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1783. The newly independent US and GA now faced the

More information

American Government. Unit 2 Study Guide

American Government. Unit 2 Study Guide American Government Unit 2 Study Guide Events leading up the Declaration of Independence: 1) Stamp Act- a tax placed on all printed material a. An attempt to earn money lost in the French and Indian War

More information

LESSON TWO: THE FEDERALIST PAPERS

LESSON TWO: THE FEDERALIST PAPERS LESSON TWO: THE FEDERALIST PAPERS OVERVIEW OBJECTIVES Students will be able to: Identify the Articles of Confederation and explain why it failed. Explain the argument over the need for a bill of rights

More information

Grade 7 History Mr. Norton

Grade 7 History Mr. Norton Grade 7 History Mr. Norton Section 1: Washington Takes Office Section 2: Creating a Foreign Policy Section 3: Political Parties Emerge Section 4: The Second President Grade 7 History Mr. Norton Cornell

More information

CHAPTER 9 The Confederation and the Constitution,

CHAPTER 9 The Confederation and the Constitution, CHAPTER 9 The Confederation and the Constitution, 1776 1790 A. Checklist of Learning Objectives After mastering this chapter, you should be able to: 1. Explain the broad movement toward social and political

More information

CREATING A GOVERNMENT

CREATING A GOVERNMENT Let us not be afraid to view with a steady eye the dangers with which we are surrounded. Are we not on the eve of a war, which is only to be prevented by the hopes from this convention? CREATING A GOVERNMENT

More information

Forming a New Government

Forming a New Government Forming a New Government Why Independent in the First Place? Citizens wanted to limit the power of government Lack of representation No taxation without representation Protect personal freedoms Desired

More information

CHAPTER 2: REVOLUTION AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC

CHAPTER 2: REVOLUTION AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC CHAPTER 2: REVOLUTION AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC COLONIAL RESISTANCE AND REBELLION SECTION 1 England s Parliament and Big Ben The Proclamation of 1763 sought to halt the westward expansion of the colonist,

More information

CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION

CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION Objectives Why did the Constitutional Convention draft a new plan for government? How did the rival plans for the new government differ? What other conflicts required the Framers

More information

10/13/14 GOVERNMENT BY THE STATES OPPOSITION TO THE ARTICLES CHAPTER 5 THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES ( )

10/13/14 GOVERNMENT BY THE STATES OPPOSITION TO THE ARTICLES CHAPTER 5 THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES ( ) 1 CHAPTER 5 THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES (1776 1800) Mr. Anderson, M.Ed., J.D. GOVERNMENT BY THE STATES Early Gov t Articles of Confederation Set of laws to govern the U.S. most power w/ the states

More information

LECTURE 3-3: THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION AND THE CONSTITUTION

LECTURE 3-3: THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION AND THE CONSTITUTION LECTURE 3-3: THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION AND THE CONSTITUTION The American Revolution s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government. I. Allegiances A.

More information

Name Class Date. MATCHING In the space provided, write the letter of the term or person that matches each description. Some answers will not be used.

Name Class Date. MATCHING In the space provided, write the letter of the term or person that matches each description. Some answers will not be used. Origins of American Government Section 1 MATCHING In the space provided, write the letter of the term or person that matches each description. Some answers will not be used. 1. Idea that people should

More information

What to Know Chapter 4: Forming a Government How does the government control itself? RTI Standards: Need to know. Assignment Title

What to Know Chapter 4: Forming a Government How does the government control itself? RTI Standards: Need to know. Assignment Title What to Know Chapter 4: Forming a Government How does the government control itself? RTI Standards: Need to know Powers of government Assignment Title Three Branches of Government System of Checks and

More information

The Constitutional Convention

The Constitutional Convention The Constitutional Convention Problems like Shay s Rebellion revealed the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation This event convinced many U.S. citizens that our 1 st written plan of government needed

More information

Constitutional Convention

Constitutional Convention Constitutional Convention I INTRODUCTION Constitutional Convention, meeting during the summer of 1787 at which delegates from 12 states wrote the Constitution of the United States. At the convention in

More information

Chapter Two: The Constitution

Chapter Two: The Constitution Chapter Two: The Constitution Learning Outcomes 1. Explain how the colonial experience prepared Americans for independence. 2. Discuss the restrictions that Britain placed on the colonies and the American

More information

Chapter 6. APUSH Mr. Muller

Chapter 6. APUSH Mr. Muller Chapter 6 APUSH Mr. Muller Aim: How is the New Republic tested? Do Now: Thus I consent, sir, to this Constitution, because I expect no better, and because I am not sure that it is not the best. The opinions

More information

Creating a Nation Test Review

Creating a Nation Test Review Creating a Nation Test Review Question #1: Multiple Choice The Northwest ordinance of 1787 is important because. A. It sent troops to the Northwest to protect the colonies from Native Americans. B. It

More information

Constitution Test Study Guide

Constitution Test Study Guide Constitution Test Study Guide Part One: Development of the Constitution Articles of Confederation: America's first government. The 13 states were loosely unified but the government was very weak, with

More information

Chapter 6: The Constitution and the New Republic,

Chapter 6: The Constitution and the New Republic, Chapter 6: The Constitution and the New Republic, 1787-1800 1. The United States Under the Articles, 1781-1787 a. Foreign Problems i. failed to uphold the Treaty of Paris, did not return Loyalist property

More information

AIM: How did the Articles of Confederation impact the U.S.?

AIM: How did the Articles of Confederation impact the U.S.? AIM: How did the Articles of Confederation impact the U.S.? Do Now: How do you think Hale Charter Academy would function if we got rid of the assistant principal, and the dean, and we allowed the individual

More information

Ch. 8: Creating the Constitution

Ch. 8: Creating the Constitution Ch. 8: Creating the Constitution The Articles of Confederation After declaring independence from Britain in 1776, Congress tried to unite the states under one national government. However, many feared

More information

The Coming of Independence. Ratifying the Constitution

The Coming of Independence. Ratifying the Constitution C H A P T E R 2 Origins of American Government 1 SECTION 1 SECTION 2 SECTION 3 SECTION 4 SECTION 5 Our Political Beginnings The Coming of Independence The Critical Period Creating the Constitution Ratifying

More information

WARM UP. 1 Using the information from yesterday or new information collected using your ipad create a bubble map on the Constitutional Convention

WARM UP. 1 Using the information from yesterday or new information collected using your ipad create a bubble map on the Constitutional Convention WARM UP 1 Using the information from yesterday or new information collected using your ipad create a bubble map on the Constitutional Convention 2 Include people, dates, locations, facts and other information

More information

It s to late to apologize uzfrawatbvg&feature=player_de tailpage#t=4s

It s to late to apologize  uzfrawatbvg&feature=player_de tailpage#t=4s It s to late to apologize http://www.youtube.com/watch?v= uzfrawatbvg&feature=player_de tailpage#t=4s War effectively comes to an end in October 1781 with the defeat of the British at Yorktown. Washington

More information

Basic Concepts of Government The English colonists brought 3 ideas that loom large in the shaping of the government in the United States.

Basic Concepts of Government The English colonists brought 3 ideas that loom large in the shaping of the government in the United States. Civics Honors Chapter Two: Origins of American Government Section One: Our Political Beginnings Limited Government Representative government Magna Carta Petition of Right English Bill of Rights Charter

More information

The Constitutional Convention

The Constitutional Convention The Constitutional Convention Problems like Shay s Rebellion revealed the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation This event convinced many U.S. citizens that our 1 st written plan of government needed

More information

The Constitution. Chapter 2 O Connor and Sabato American Government: Continuity and Change

The Constitution. Chapter 2 O Connor and Sabato American Government: Continuity and Change The Constitution Chapter 2 O Connor and Sabato American Government: Continuity and Change The Constitution In this chapter we will cover 1. The Origins of a New Nation 2. The Declaration of Independence

More information

american History Semester Exam review (KEY)

american History Semester Exam review (KEY) american History Semester Exam review (KEY) 1. Fill in the name of each era and characteristics. Then use the word bank to match the events. 1. Exploration & Colonization 2. American Revolution 3. Creating

More information

A. As You Read. B. Reviewing Key Terms. Section 1 Guided Reading and Review Government and the State

A. As You Read. B. Reviewing Key Terms. Section 1 Guided Reading and Review Government and the State 1 Section 1 Guided Reading and Review Government and the State As you read Section 1, fill in the answers to the following questions. 1. What are the four characteristics of a state? a. b. c. d. 2. What

More information

netw rks Where in the world? When did it happen? The Federalist Era Lesson 1 The First President ESSENTIAL QUESTION Terms to Know GUIDING QUESTIONS

netw rks Where in the world? When did it happen? The Federalist Era Lesson 1 The First President ESSENTIAL QUESTION Terms to Know GUIDING QUESTIONS Lesson 1 The First President ESSENTIAL QUESTION What are the characteristics of a leader? GUIDING QUESTIONS 1. What decisions did Washington and the new Congress have to make about the new government?

More information

THE CONSTITUTION. How do societies balance individual and community rights? How does social change influence government?

THE CONSTITUTION. How do societies balance individual and community rights? How does social change influence government? CHAPTER 5 THE CONSTITUTION NGSSS SS.7.C.1.7 Describe how the Constitution limits the powers of government through separation of powers and checks and balances. ESSENTIAL QUESTION Why do people create,

More information

Analyze the maps in Setting the Stage. Then answer the following questions and fill out the map as directed.

Analyze the maps in Setting the Stage. Then answer the following questions and fill out the map as directed. Geography Challenge G e o G r a p h y C h a l l e n G e Geography Skills Analyze the maps in Setting the Stage. Then answer the following questions and fill out the map as directed. 1. Label each state

More information

Ch. 7 Launching a Nation Study Guide

Ch. 7 Launching a Nation Study Guide Ch. 7 Launching a Nation Study Guide Short Answer 1. As secretary of state Thomas Jefferson criticized U.S. policy toward France because he 2. In general, Congress created departments in the executive

More information

Ratification. By March 1781, all 13 Colonies had ratified the Articles of Confederation, making it the official written plan of government.

Ratification. By March 1781, all 13 Colonies had ratified the Articles of Confederation, making it the official written plan of government. The Goal To form a confederation of states - A Firm League of Friendship To continue the form of government established by the Second Continental Congress Ratification By March 1781, all 13 Colonies had

More information

A. True or False Where the statement is true, mark T. Where it is false, mark F, and correct it in the space immediately below.

A. True or False Where the statement is true, mark T. Where it is false, mark F, and correct it in the space immediately below. AP U.S. History Mr. Mercado Name Chapter 10 Launching the New Ship of State, 1789-1800 A. True or False Where the statement is true, mark T. Where it is false, mark F, and correct it in the space immediately

More information

Once a year, each state would select a delegation to send to the capital city.

Once a year, each state would select a delegation to send to the capital city. In November 1777, the Continental Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. This was a plan for a loose union of the states under Congress. Once a year, each state would select

More information

4. After some negotiating, mostly with the promise of the Bill of Rights, the Constitution was ratified.

4. After some negotiating, mostly with the promise of the Bill of Rights, the Constitution was ratified. Chapter #9: The Confederation and the Constitution Big Picture Ideas 1. The Articles of Confederation, the first government set up after the American Revolution, was structured out of fear of a too-strong

More information

Creating a Republic. Loose Confederation Constitutional Convention Ideas Behind the Constitution Ratification & Bill of Rights

Creating a Republic. Loose Confederation Constitutional Convention Ideas Behind the Constitution Ratification & Bill of Rights Creating a Republic Loose Confederation Constitutional Convention Ideas Behind the Constitution Ratification & Bill of Rights 7-1: Loose Confederation States Constitutions Articles of Confederation Weaknesses

More information

Section Preview. Toward a New Constitution. Section Chapter 14: With Libery and Justice, the Federal Government

Section Preview. Toward a New Constitution. Section Chapter 14: With Libery and Justice, the Federal Government Section Preview As you read, look for: reasons for calling for a constitutional convention, important issues at the Constitutional Convention, method of amending the Constitution, basic principles of our

More information

The Constitutional Convention. Chapter 2 Section 4

The Constitutional Convention. Chapter 2 Section 4 The Constitutional Convention Chapter 2 Section 4 Constitutional Convention May 1787 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 74 delegates allowed, 55 attended, 39 signed final Delegates to the Convention Had lots of

More information

The British did not even stay for the official portrait at the Treaty of Paris in 1783!

The British did not even stay for the official portrait at the Treaty of Paris in 1783! Creating a Republic The British did not even stay for the official portrait at the Treaty of Paris in 1783! The treaty ending the war with Britain, more than doubled the territory of the United States!

More information

If Men Were Angels: Teaching the Constitution With the Federalist Papers

If Men Were Angels: Teaching the Constitution With the Federalist Papers If Men Were Angels: Teaching the Constitution With the Federalist Papers Overview This lesson explores the Federalist Papers. First, students engage in a discussion about how they get information about

More information

Constitutional Convention Unit Notes

Constitutional Convention Unit Notes Constitutional Convention Unit Notes Civics Textbook: Government and Society - Text p. 5 Cue four reasons why society needs a government Notes 1. Law and Order Government makes laws to protect citizens

More information

Constitutional Convention

Constitutional Convention Constitutional Convention Members Principles Agreements and compromises The Constitutional Convention, 1787 u 55 delegates attended but on a typical day 35 were present u 29 held college degrees u 34 were

More information

Period 3: 1754 to 1800 (French and Indian War Election of Jefferson)

Period 3: 1754 to 1800 (French and Indian War Election of Jefferson) Period 3: 1754 to 1800 (French and Indian War Election of Jefferson) Key Concept 3.1: British attempts to assert tighter control over its North American colonies and the colonial resolve to pursue self-government

More information

Parliament. Magna Carta ( ) A. Signed it. English Bill of Rights. Common Law. Vocabulary Magna Carta Rule of Law Due Process

Parliament. Magna Carta ( ) A. Signed it. English Bill of Rights. Common Law. Vocabulary Magna Carta Rule of Law Due Process Objective 1.1-1.1 - Identify the English documents that influence American colonial government Vocabulary 1.1 - Magna Carta Rule of Law Due Process Parliament English Bill of Rights Common Law precedent

More information

Origins of American Government. Chapter 2

Origins of American Government. Chapter 2 Origins of American Government Chapter 2 Section 1 Essential Questions 1) What two principles of government came from the English heritage of the colonists? 2) What documents from England influenced the

More information

4 th Grade U.S. Government Study Guide

4 th Grade U.S. Government Study Guide 4 th Grade U.S. Government Study Guide Big Ideas: Imagine trying to make a new country from scratch. You ve just had a war with the only leaders you ve ever known, and now you have to step up and lead.

More information

Ch.8, Sec.2 Creating the Constitution

Ch.8, Sec.2 Creating the Constitution ü A al Convention Is Called - during the summer of 1787, 12 states sent delegates to Philadelphia to discuss amending the Articles of Confederation - the example set by Shays Rebellion proved our young

More information

NEW GOVERNMENT: CONFEDERATION TO CONSTITUTION FLIP CARD

NEW GOVERNMENT: CONFEDERATION TO CONSTITUTION FLIP CARD NEW GOVERNMENT: CONFEDERATION TO CONSTITUTION FLIP CARD Big Ideas: Imagine trying to make a new country from scratch. You ve just had a war with the only leaders you ve ever known, and now you have to

More information

[ 2.1 ] Origins of American Political Ideals

[ 2.1 ] Origins of American Political Ideals [ 2.1 ] Origins of American Political Ideals [ 2.1 ] Origins of American Political Ideals Key Terms limited government representative government due process bicameral unicameral [ 2.1 ] Origins of American

More information

Underpinnings of the Constitution

Underpinnings of the Constitution Underpinnings of the Constitution A constitution is a nations basic laws creates political institutions assigns and divides power in government provides certain guarantees to citizens includes unwritten

More information

Chapter 5:1 o Explain early state governments and how they reflected republican ideals. o Describe the structure and powers of the nation under the

Chapter 5:1 o Explain early state governments and how they reflected republican ideals. o Describe the structure and powers of the nation under the Chapter 5:1 o Explain early state governments and how they reflected republican ideals. o Describe the structure and powers of the nation under the Articles of Confederation. o List the main weakness of

More information

Constitutional Principles (4).notebook. October 08, 2014

Constitutional Principles (4).notebook. October 08, 2014 Bell Ringers Mrs. Salasney Homework Objective: Students will describe the conflicts facing the governing of the new nation 2 Which action by the British government was considered by American colonists

More information

The Constitutional Convention

The Constitutional Convention Early United States I can describe how thirteen colonies evolved into the United States. 4 I can make inferences that go beyond what was taught in class or connect and explain the 3.0 learning targets

More information

Confederation and the Constitution

Confederation and the Constitution Confederation and the Constitution American leaders created the Constitution as a blueprint of government for the United States. WHY IT MATTERS NOW More than 200 years after its creation, the Constitution

More information

INTRODUCTION TO UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT: Foundations of U.S. Democracy. Constitutional Convention: Key Agreements and the Great Compromise

INTRODUCTION TO UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT: Foundations of U.S. Democracy. Constitutional Convention: Key Agreements and the Great Compromise Constitutional Convention: Key Agreements and the Great Compromise Virginia Plan proposed on May 29, 1787 This plan was also known as the Randolph Resolution, since it was proposed by Edmund Randolph of

More information

Section 4 at a Glance The Constitutional Convention

Section 4 at a Glance The Constitutional Convention Section 4 at a Glance The Constitutional Convention At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, delegates debated competing plans the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan for how the new government

More information

APUSH Concept Outline Period 3: 1754 to 1800

APUSH Concept Outline Period 3: 1754 to 1800 APUSH Concept Outline Period 3: 1754 to 1800 Name Directions: The Concept Outline below presents the required concepts and topics that students need to understand for the APUSH test. The statements in

More information

Creating the Constitution

Creating the Constitution G e o g r a p h y C h a l l e n g e Creating the Constitution What compromises emerged from the Constitutional Convention? P R E V I E W On a separate sheet of paper, create a T-chart with the heads Articles

More information

Debating the Constitution

Debating the Constitution SECTION 3 A Bill of Rights A bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth, general or particular; and what no just government should refuse or rest on inference.

More information

Quarter One: Unit Four

Quarter One: Unit Four SS.7.C.1.5 Articles of Confederation ****At the end of this lesson, I will be able to do the following: Students will identify the weaknesses of the government under the Articles of Confederation (i.e.,

More information

Chapter 8 and 9 Review

Chapter 8 and 9 Review Chapter 8 and 9 Review A constitution is a document that outlines the powers of government. Constitution (1787) James Madison formulated many of the ideas included in the Constitution and is known as the

More information

American Democracy Now Chapter 2: The Constitution

American Democracy Now Chapter 2: The Constitution American Democracy Now Chapter 2: The Constitution Multiple-Choice Questions: 1. Which of these countries employs an unwritten constitution? a. the United States b. Great Britain c. Venezuela d. Kenya

More information

Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation 1. Congress could not levy or collect taxes

Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation 1. Congress could not levy or collect taxes Virginia Plan New Jersey Plan The Great Compromise UNIT 2 TEST REVIEW SHEET Strengths of A of C 1- Established Federalism - A system of government where power is divided between a national government and

More information

Vocabulary Match-Up. Name Date Period Workbook Activity

Vocabulary Match-Up. Name Date Period Workbook Activity Name Date Period Workbook Activity Vocabulary Match-Up Chapter 2, Lesson 1 7 Part A Directions Match the vocabulary word in Column 1 with its definition in Column 2. Write the correct letter on each line.

More information

CHAPTER 2 ORIGINS OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT SECTION 1: OUR POLITICAL BEGINNINGS

CHAPTER 2 ORIGINS OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT SECTION 1: OUR POLITICAL BEGINNINGS CHAPTER 2 ORIGINS OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT SECTION 1: OUR POLITICAL BEGINNINGS OUR POLITICAL BEGINNINGS Basic Concepts of Government Early settlers brought ideas of government or political systems with them.

More information

SWBAT. Explain George Washington s implementation of the new Constitution Compare problems Washington faced with those of Obama

SWBAT. Explain George Washington s implementation of the new Constitution Compare problems Washington faced with those of Obama George Washington George Washington DO NOW: With a partner answer the following: 1.Would our current president be able to successfully lead a new nation? Why/Why not? 2.What types of problems would the

More information

Foundations of the American Government

Foundations of the American Government Foundations of the American Government 1600s-1770s Each colony was loyal to Great Britain but was responsible for forming its own government, taxing and defending itself. The government and constitution

More information

Wednesday, September 28 th

Wednesday, September 28 th Wednesday, September 28 th Midterm #1: Monday, Sept. 26 th to Thursday, Sept. 29 th Wednesday ($5 late fee) Thursday ($7 late fee) Must have test in hand by 11 am Exam in Testing Center. Be sure to go

More information

Chapter 2:4 Constitutional Convention

Chapter 2:4 Constitutional Convention Chapter 2:4 Constitutional Convention Psa_119:165 Great peace have they which love thy law: and nothing shall offend them. Objectives: 2:4 Our Political Beginnings o Students will examine the process that

More information

Module 1.2 U.S. Constitutional Framework. Constitutional Trivia! Overview of Lecture 6/4/2008

Module 1.2 U.S. Constitutional Framework. Constitutional Trivia! Overview of Lecture 6/4/2008 Module 1.2 U.S. Constitutional Framework Prof. Bryan McQuide University of Idaho Summer 2008 Constitutional Trivia! Which of the following Presidents signed the U.S. Constitution? George Washington John

More information

The Constitution I. Considerations that influenced the formulation and adoption of the Constitution A. Roots 1. Religious Freedom a) Puritan

The Constitution I. Considerations that influenced the formulation and adoption of the Constitution A. Roots 1. Religious Freedom a) Puritan The Constitution I. Considerations that influenced the formulation and adoption of the Constitution A. Roots 1. Religious Freedom a) Puritan Theocracy (1) 9 of 13 had state church b) Rhode Island (1) Roger

More information

George Washington. Information to be included:

George Washington. Information to be included: George Washington Information to be included: 2 Facts (ONLY) BEFORE Washington was President, including place of Election facts events of and surrounding his nomination and election to the office of President,

More information

Constitutional Convention

Constitutional Convention Constitutional Convention How did the United States overcome the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and provide for the organization of the new government? What role did compromise play in the

More information

The First Political Parties: Chapter 5, Section 3

The First Political Parties: Chapter 5, Section 3 The First Political Parties: Chapter 5, Section 3 Citizen participation is essential to the foundation and preservation of the US political system. By the election of 1796, two distinct political parties

More information

Creating the Constitution 1. Teachers Curriculum Institute. The United States, N 70 W 35 N 30 N. 75 W miles

Creating the Constitution 1. Teachers Curriculum Institute. The United States, N 70 W 35 N 30 N. 75 W miles G E O G R A P H Y C H A L L E N G E The United States, 1790 40 N 70 W N W E S 35 N 30 N 0 75 W 100 200 miles 85 W 80 W 0 100 200 kilometers Albers Conic Equal-Area Projection Creating the Constitution

More information

UNIT 2 TEST REVIEW SHEET. Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation 1. Congress could not levy or collect taxes

UNIT 2 TEST REVIEW SHEET. Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation 1. Congress could not levy or collect taxes Virginia Plan New Jersey Plan The Great Compromise UNIT 2 TEST REVIEW SHEET Strengths of A of C 1- Established Federalism - A system of government where power is divided between a national government and

More information

Welcome Work. Use the paper provided and create a circle map of what you KNOW about George Washington.

Welcome Work. Use the paper provided and create a circle map of what you KNOW about George Washington. Welcome Work Use the paper provided and create a circle map of what you KNOW about George Washington. Essential Question How did George Washington s presidency influence the New Nation? SS.8.A.3.1 GEORGE

More information

I. Making the Constitution: (includes The Articles of Confederation, Preamble, and Federalists vs. Antifederalists )

I. Making the Constitution: (includes The Articles of Confederation, Preamble, and Federalists vs. Antifederalists ) Civics 3 rd Quarter Civics Study Guide Page 1 Student Name: Civics 3 rd Quarter Civics Study Guide Date: In completing this study guide, you will need to draw on your knowledge from throughout the 3 rd

More information

Convention and Compromise: Chapter 3, Section 2

Convention and Compromise: Chapter 3, Section 2 Convention and Compromise: Chapter 3, Section 2 A constitution reflects the values and goals of a society that creat it. The new Constitution corrected the weaknesses of government under the Articles of

More information

Warm Up 12/3. Why did Shays Rebellion occur? What did it prove to many people? What did Alexander Hamilton and James Madison call for?

Warm Up 12/3. Why did Shays Rebellion occur? What did it prove to many people? What did Alexander Hamilton and James Madison call for? Warm Up 12/3 Why did Shays Rebellion occur? What did it prove to many people? What did Alexander Hamilton and James Madison call for? 1. How did many Americans feel about the Articles of Confederation?

More information

T H E C O N F E D E R A T I O N A N D T H E C O N S T I T U T I O N C H A P T E R 7 A P U S H I S T O R Y

T H E C O N F E D E R A T I O N A N D T H E C O N S T I T U T I O N C H A P T E R 7 A P U S H I S T O R Y T H E C O N F E D E R A T I O N A N D T H E C O N S T I T U T I O N C H A P T E R 7 A P U S H I S T O R Y LEARNING GOAL: Students will be able to explain the growth of the new governing systems in the

More information

Direct Democracy. (Ahoto/Nam Y. Huh)

Direct Democracy. (Ahoto/Nam Y. Huh) Direct Democracy Political decisions are made by the people directly, rather than by their elected representatives First democracy comes from Ancient Athens Pericles Funeral Oration: We partake of equality

More information

Quarter One: Unit Four

Quarter One: Unit Four SS.7.C.1.5 Articles of Confederation ****At the end of this lesson, I will be able to do the following: Students will identify the weaknesses of the government under the Articles of Confederation (i.e.,

More information

Bill of Rights. 1. Meet the Source (2:58) Interview with Whitman Ridgway (Professor, University of Maryland, College Park)

Bill of Rights. 1. Meet the Source (2:58) Interview with Whitman Ridgway (Professor, University of Maryland, College Park) Interview with Whitman Ridgway (Professor, University of Maryland, College Park) Bill of Rights 1. Meet the Source (2:58) Well, the Bill of Rights, in my opinion, is a very remarkable document because

More information