Origins of American Government

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1 Origins of American Government A More Perfect Union: Shaping American Government Take Home Test and Study Guide for In-Class Test Name Period Part One: Take Home Test Complete the following at home and return before or on the day of your final class for the 1 st semester. The final classes of the semester are on Thursday, January 14 th for the R1 and R2 classes and Wednesday, January 13 th for the W2 class. Use your notes, study guides, graphic organizers and yellow course book to help answer the questions but do not copy directly from the book. I have thoroughly read the book and will be able to easily tell if you do. Put your answers in your own words. Basic (2) - Questions 1-4 answered thoroughly. Proficient (3) - Questions 1-9 answered thoroughly. Advanced (4) - Questions 1-11 answered thoroughly. Thoroughly answer questions 1-4 for a Before fighting began, what are 4 things the British did to the colonists that angered them? Describe why it angered them. a. b. c. d. What are 3 things the colonists did to the British in retaliation. a. b. c. 2. Did the Articles of Confederation create a strong national government or strong state governments? 1

2 Did the Constitution create a strong national government or strong state governments? 3. Describe some of the successes and failures of the Articles of Confederation? For each, describe the impact it had on American government Successes Impact on American government Failures 1. Impact on American government Today, who has the power to make the following decisions, national or state government? a. Going to war b. Driving laws like no text messaging c. Coin or print money d. Immigration policies e. Death penalty In addition to questions 1-4, thoroughly answer questions 5 9 for a Why did people argue that the Bill of Rights should be added to the Constitution? 6. What was the Three-Fifths Compromise? 7. How did the French and Indian War lead to a conflict between the colonists and the British? 2

3 8. After gaining independence, voting privileges in most states were limited. Who was allowed to vote? When writing the Constitution, what arguments did some people give in favor of keeping the vote limited to those people? 9. What was the purpose of writing and signing the Declaration of Independence? In addition to questions 1-9 thoroughly answer questions 10 and 11 for a Martin Luther King Jr., in his famous I Have A Dream speech, quoted the Declaration of Independence when he said: I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal. We learned that while the Declaration of Independence is not a constitution, and thus, does not establish a system of government, it does provide some guidance or basic foundation for how American government should operate. Hence, why King would call upon the country to recognize the mission set out in the Declaration and to live it out. My question to you is how could the Declaration be used in an argument for a contemporary American issue? Write a multi-paragraph (4 to 5) essay describing an issue that America is confronted with today and how some could use the Declaration as cause for the government to take action. 11. We learned about states rights and about how current issues like medical marijuana and same sex marriage involve a conflict between the federal government and state governments and who should have the power to make certain decisions. Please answer the following: First, Describe the concept of states rights. Why do people believe in states rights? What historical background led the founders of the Constitution to favor states rights? What kinds of people favor states rights today? Second, describe an issue that involves a conflict between the federal government and state governments. Third, describe how that issue could be resolved in the future, including the process involving the legislative, executive and judicial branches. Consider, how can this issue be resolved? Finally, what do you think? Should the federal government or state governments have more power in making decisions? You should write at least one paragraph for each section. 3

4 Part Two: Study Guide for In-Class Test Test Dates: Wednesday, January 13 th for W2 and Thursday, January 14 th for R1 and R2 Basic (2) - 10/16 Vocab words identified and questions 1-2 answered thoroughly. Proficient (3) - 12/16 Vocab words identified and questions 1-3 answered thoroughly. Advanced (4) - 14/16 Vocab words identified and questions 1-4 answered thoroughly. The vocabulary test will be multiple choice with a selection of short answer questions. A. limited government B. representative government C. executive branch D. legislative branch E. judicial branch F. constitution G. First Continental Congress I. Declaration of Independence J. Articles of Confederation K. ratify L. Federalist Papers M. Federalists N. Anti-Federalists N. federal government 4

5 O. amendment P. states rights Thoroughly answer question 1 for a What arguments did the Federalists use during the ratification of the Constitution? - What arguments did the Anti-Federalists use during the ratification of the Constitution? In addition to question 1, thoroughly answer question 2 for a In class we looked at some of the mini-debates at the Constitutional convention in Philadelphia. Describe the opposing viewpoints on one of those mini-debates. For example, some of the debates included slavery, voting privileges, the makeup of the legislative branch, the makeup of the executive branch, and slaves being used in a state s population total for determining representation in Congress. In addition to questions 1 and 2, thoroughly answer question 3 for a John Locke was a philosopher whose ideas about government were influential with American revolutionaries and the founding fathers. His ideas also influenced the thought of politicians in the fight between the North and the South in the 1800s. First, describe how his ideas influenced American revolutionaries and the founding fathers and provide evidence of his influence. Second, describe how the South used Locke s compact theory in their dispute with the North (there are two main points they fought over). Third, describe the argument the North used to dispute the South s compact theory argument. Finally, what do you think John Locke would have to say today about a contemporary issue (such as medical marijuana, same sex marriage, the death penalty, etc.)? You should write at least one paragraph for each of the four points. 5

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