The US Constitution. Articles of the Constitution

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "The US Constitution. Articles of the Constitution"

Transcription

1 The US Constitution Articles of the Constitution Article I delegates all legislative power to the bicameral Congress. The two chambers differ in the qualifications required of their members, the term of office (two years for the House, six for the Senate), and their modes of election. While members of the House are directly elected, Senators were originally appointed by state legislators. This did not change until the Seventeenth Amendment (1916) provided for direct election of Senators in their home states. To apportion seats among the states in the House of Representatives, Section 2 of Article I requires a census of the population every ten years. The House and Senate also have contrasting, specialized functions, with the House having the sole ability to initiate bills dealing with taxes while the Senate exercises greater oversight over presidential appointments and foreign policy. Article I, the first and longest part of the Constitution, also describes the legislative process and how a bill becomes law. Article I, Section 8 identifies a wide range of enumerated powers, or powers specifically listed in the text, exercised by Congress. These powers cover a wide range of subjects and among them is the authority of Congress to tax, spend, and borrow. A number of these powers deal with the economy, such as the power to coin money, grant copyrights and maintain a postal service. Perhaps the most important grant found in this category is the interstate commerce clause which allows the federal government to regulate a wide variety of economic activity. The enumerated powers also recognize the federal government's primacy in the conduct of diplomacy giving it authority over war and peace as well as maintenance of the armed forces. There is more to the power of the national government than meets the eye. Tucked away inconspicuously at the end of Article I, Section 8 is a clause giving Congress authority to make any laws necessary and proper to carry out any of the enumerated powers just listed. The necessary and proper clause, often called the "elastic clause," has been interpreted to recognize additional implied powers; federal powers that are not specifically mentioned in the text of the Constitution itself but nonetheless exist due to the flexible interpretation of the necessary and proper clause. A chief example is the national government's recognized power to create a federal bank in order to facilitate its enumerated power to coin money.

2 The US Constitution and Supermajorities A major defect of the Articles of Confederation is that it required a supermajority for making many important decisions. For example, nine out of thirteen states (70 percent) had to approve any governmental action or decision. The Framers of the US Constitution deliberately set out to remedy this defect by empowering Congress to make most decisions by majority rule (51 percent). Majority rule is not without problems however. For instance, it may be easier for special interest groups to obtain support for their cause from 51 percent of congressional members instead of a supermajority (60 percent or 70 percent). Furthermore, if Congress is overly responsive to the ever-changing whims of the public on hot-button issues, a 2-point difference between 51 percent and 49 percent can shift in the blink of an eye. Lastly, the potential exists for the majority to place its interests above a minority's interests to such an extent that the majority becomes tyrannical. Therefore, while the Framers preferred simple majority rule for ordinary legislation, they specified certain situations in which a supermajority margin must be reached before Congress can take action. This activity focuses on actions in the Constitution that require a supermajority margin. Interactive Activity: The U.S. Constitution and Supermajorities Identifies the margin of votes required before Congress can take action. Example 1: Approving the vice president's and cabinet members' request to remove the president from office requires a two-thirds vote in both the House and the Senate. Example 2: Convicting the president on impeachment charges requires a two-thirds vote in the Senate. Example 3: Expelling a member from the House of Representatives requires a two-thirds vote in the House. Example 4: Expelling a member from the Senate requires a two-thirds vote in the Senate: Example 5: Overriding a presidential veto requires a two-thirds vote in both the House and Senate. Example 6: Passing a constitutional amendment requires a two-thirds vote in both the House and Senate. Example 7: Ratifying a constitutional amendment requires a three-fourths vote of state legislators (38 states). Example 8: Calling for a Constitutional Convention requires a two-thirds vote of state legislators (34 states). Example 8: Approving or rejecting a resolution to ratify a treaty requires a two-thirds vote in the Senate.

3 Article II: The Executive Branch Article II describes the executive branch and specifies, without defining it, that the executive power is vested in the president who enforces and administers the law. His formal legislative power is quite limited, being found exclusively in the negative power of his legislative veto. The president, who serves for a term of four years, is commander-in-chief of the armed forces. The Constitution thus firmly establishes the principle of civilian control of the military. The president also plays the role of head of state, receiving ambassadors and appointing his own with the advice and consent of the Senate. The president negotiates treaties with foreign countries that are ratified by a vote of two-thirds of the Senate. He has authority to appoint members of his cabinet and other officials of the executive branch. The president also appoints individuals to the federal judiciary, in particular members of the Supreme Court. It is important to note that Article II establishes the comparatively curious method of selecting the president, not by direct vote but by the Electoral College. Finally, Article II describes impeachment, the legal process by which the president may be removed from office by Congress. Article III: The Judiciary If the Constitution's description of the executive branch is comparatively terse next to its extremely detailed description of Congress, it is even less descriptive of the judicial branch. Article III creates a Supreme Court but allows Congress to create inferior courts as it wishes. Federal courts have jurisdiction, defined as the authority to hear and decide a case, over issues arising under federal law. Although Article III does not mention the most impressive power of the courts, judicial review, which is the power of a court to declare acts or laws of elected officials unconstitutional, an early Supreme Court case, Marbury v. Madison (1803), created the legal basis for it. Federal judges are appointed by the president with the advice and consent of the Senate and serve for life or until they retire. Judges can be impeached by Congress in similar fashion to the president, but the Constitution protects judicial independence by prohibiting Congress from lowering judicial salaries as long as they hold office. Articles IV VII While the first three articles of the Constitution describe the structure and powers of the three branches of government the remaining amendments are a more motley collection devoted to

4 the relationship between the federal government and the states, among the states themselves, the constitutional amendment process, and the ratification process. Article IV, for example, contains the full faith and credit clause requiring states to recognize each other's public acts and legal proceedings. The privileges and immunities clause prohibits states from treating citizens of other states in a discriminatory fashion in most situations. Article VI contains the important supremacy clause, while Article VII establishes the now moot conditions for the Constitution's original ratification. One of the most important provisions in any constitution is the manner in which it can be amended. Article V creates a two-stage and rather difficult amendment process. The typical constitutional amendment requires a two-thirds vote of each chamber of Congress to propose an amendment and the amendment must be ratified by three-fourths of the state legislatures or in constitutional conventions called by the states for the same purpose. In over 227 years of American history, the US Constitution has been amended only 27 times. However, constitutional scholars and others recognize that there have been many unofficial amendments to the US Constitution both through judicial interpretation and through political practice. Find the Amendment One purpose of the Constitution is to place limits on governmental power. The Framers of the Constitution did not want governmental powers to be easily expanded or narrowed based on the whims of the people. Therefore, they established a formal amendment process for changing the Constitution. This activity focuses on the major amendments to the Constitution. Interactive Activity: Find the Amendment Focuses on provisions in key constitutional amendments. 1st Amendment protects free speech, press, and assembly. 13th Amendment abolishes slavery. 14th Amendment protects due process and defines citizenship. 15th Amendment prohibits denying the right to vote due to race. 16th Amendment allows Congress to tax incomes. 17th Amendment provides for direct election of Senators. 19th Amendment prohibits denying the right to vote due to sex. 22nd Amendment limits the president to 2 terms. 25th Amendment provides for a president's disability. 26th Amendment enables individuals 18 years or older to vote.

5 Articles of the US Constitution The main body of the Constitution is made up of seven articles. The Articles explain how the government works. They also carefully describe the rules for electing government officials, like senators and the president. This activity tests your knowledge about what is covered in each Article. Interactive Activity: The Articles of the U.S. Constitution Part 1 Reviews key provisions in the Articles. Article 1, Section 1 establishes the legislative branch. Article I, Section 7 describes how a bill becomes law. Article I, Section 8 covers enumerated powers, necessary and proper clause, and commerce clause. Article I, Section 9 limits congressional powers. Article II, Section 1 establishes the executive branch. Article II, Section 2 establishes the president as commander-in-chief. Article III, Section 1 establishes the Supreme Court. Article III, Section 2 designates the Supreme Court as primarily an appellate court. Part 2 Article IV, Section 1 covers full faith and credit clause. Article IV, Section 2 covers extradition clause. Active IV, Section 4 ensures a republican form of government. Article V details how to amend the Constitution. Article VI, Clause 2 covers the supremacy clause. Article VI, Clause 3 requires all federal and state officials to uphold the U.S. Constitution. Article VII requires nine states to ratify the Constitution before it becomes effective. Additional Resources Websites The United States Constitution Online The National Archives offers high-resolution images of the nation s charter, a text transcript, and additional resources for research.

6 Constitution Facts An educational resource for learning about the US Constitution, the website includes the full text, offers insights into the foundation of each provision, and a look at landmark decisions by the US Supreme Court. Books An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States, by Charles Beard. Professor Beard, the founder of the New School for Social Research, contends that the Founding Fathers included a clear strategy for Colonial economics in the writing of the Constitution that both revised and maintained elements of the preexisting social order.

US Constitution. Articles I-VII

US Constitution. Articles I-VII US Constitution Articles I-VII Quick Questions What is the Constitution? What is the Preamble? What are the Articles and their purpose? Preamble Six Purposes are Listed -> What are they? We the people

More information

10/6/11. A look at the history and organization of US Constitution

10/6/11. A look at the history and organization of US Constitution A look at the history and organization of US Constitution During Revolution, the states created a confederation. Loose association of states. Continental Congress responsible to war effort during the Revolution.

More information

Advanced Placement U.S. Comparative Government Extra Credit Assignment

Advanced Placement U.S. Comparative Government Extra Credit Assignment Name Pd. Advanced Placement U.S. Comparative Government Extra Credit Assignment Directions: Read the U.S. Constitution (available at many websites including http://www.usconstitution.net) and complete

More information

9.3. The Legislative Branch Makes Laws For the framers of the Constitution,

9.3. The Legislative Branch Makes Laws For the framers of the Constitution, 9.3. The Legislative Branch Makes Laws For the framers of the Constitution, the first step in building a trusted government was to create a fair way to make laws. Article I of the Constitution gives the

More information

9.1 Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to

9.1 Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to 9.1 Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to convince their states to approve the document that they

More information

Chapter 9 - The Constitution: A More Perfect Union

Chapter 9 - The Constitution: A More Perfect Union Chapter 9 - The Constitution: A More Perfect Union 9.1 - Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to convince

More information

Chapter 5: Congress: The Legislative Branch

Chapter 5: Congress: The Legislative Branch Chapter 5: Congress: The Legislative Branch Section 1: Congress Section 2: The Powers of Congress Section 3: The House of Representatives Section 4: The Senate Section 5: Congress at Work Congress Main

More information

The Articles of Confederation

The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation was the first government of the United States following the Declaration of Independence. A confederation is a state-centered, decentralized government

More information

Name Due Date: September 9, AP US Government & Politics Unit I: Constitutional Underpinnings and Federalism THE US CONSTITUTION STUDY GUIDE

Name Due Date: September 9, AP US Government & Politics Unit I: Constitutional Underpinnings and Federalism THE US CONSTITUTION STUDY GUIDE Name Due Date: September 9, 2016 AP US Government & Politics Unit I: Constitutional Underpinnings and Federalism THE US CONSTITUTION STUDY GUIDE Unit Focus: Using your annotated guide to the US Constitution

More information

The U.S. Constitution. Ch. 2.4 Ch. 3

The U.S. Constitution. Ch. 2.4 Ch. 3 The U.S. Constitution Ch. 2.4 Ch. 3 The Constitutional Convention Philadelphia Five months, from May until September 1787 Secret Meeting, closed to outside. Originally intent to revise the Articles of

More information

Constitution Test Study Guide

Constitution Test Study Guide Constitution Test Study Guide Part One: Development of the Constitution Articles of Confederation: America's first government. The 13 states were loosely unified but the government was very weak, with

More information

AP Government and Politics THE US CONSTITUTION STUDY GUIDE Available at:

AP Government and Politics THE US CONSTITUTION STUDY GUIDE Available at: Name Class Period AP Government and Politics THE US CONSTITUTION STUDY GUIDE Available at: www.constitutioncenter.org PART I: THE OVERALL STRUCTURE OF THE CONSTITUTION A. Read each article of the Constitution.

More information

Class Period THE US CONSTITUTION. 2. Compare Article I with Article II. Which article is longer and more detailed? WHY do you suppose it s longer?

Class Period THE US CONSTITUTION. 2. Compare Article I with Article II. Which article is longer and more detailed? WHY do you suppose it s longer? Name Class Period AP GOVERNMENT there s a copy of the Constitution online at http://bit.ly/1j4mbqa or http://bit.ly/1dlarv1 THE US CONSTITUTION 1. Read each article of the Constitution. Summarize the general

More information

Chapter Test. The Constitution

Chapter Test. The Constitution MULTIPLE CHOICE For each of the following, write the letter of the best choice in the space provided. 1. Which of the following is one way an amendment to the Constitution can be ratified? a. three-fourths

More information

Reading Essentials and Study Guide

Reading Essentials and Study Guide Lesson 2 The Three Branches of Government ESSENTIAL QUESTION How does the U.S. Constitution structure government and divide power between the national and state governments? Reading HELPDESK Academic Vocabulary

More information

Anatomy of the Constitution

Anatomy of the Constitution How Do They Govern? The U.S. Constitution is the document that creates our nation s government. The contents of the Constitution create the three branches of our government and give directions for how

More information

CHAPTER 5: CONGRESS: THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

CHAPTER 5: CONGRESS: THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH CHAPTER 5: CONGRESS: THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH 1 Section 1: Congress Section 2: The Powers of Congress Section 3: The House of Representative Section 4: The Senate Section 5: Congress At Work SECTION 1: CONGRESS

More information

Who attended the Philadelphia Convention? How was it organized? We the People, Unit 3 Lesson 12

Who attended the Philadelphia Convention? How was it organized? We the People, Unit 3 Lesson 12 Who attended the Philadelphia Convention? How was it organized? We the People, Unit 3 Lesson 12 A convention has been called to rewrite Redwood school constitution. We need some delegates (representatives).

More information

The Constitution I. Considerations that influenced the formulation and adoption of the Constitution A. Roots 1. Religious Freedom a) Puritan

The Constitution I. Considerations that influenced the formulation and adoption of the Constitution A. Roots 1. Religious Freedom a) Puritan The Constitution I. Considerations that influenced the formulation and adoption of the Constitution A. Roots 1. Religious Freedom a) Puritan Theocracy (1) 9 of 13 had state church b) Rhode Island (1) Roger

More information

THE CONSTITUTION. PREAMBLE = Intro

THE CONSTITUTION. PREAMBLE = Intro THE CONSTITUTION GOALS OF THE CONSTITUTION Form a More Perfect Union Establish Justice Insure Domestic Tranquility Provide for the Common Defense Promote the General Welfare refer to problems under the

More information

Anatomy of the Constitution

Anatomy of the Constitution We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings

More information

We the People: The Role of the Citizen in the United States

We the People: The Role of the Citizen in the United States We the People: The Role of the Citizen in the United States In the United States, the government gets its power to govern from the people. We have a government of the people, by the people, and for the

More information

HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTION

HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTION HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTION PROFESSOR DELAINE R. SWENSON CLASS MATERIALS n Pracownik.kul.pl/dswenson/dydaktyka 1 The use of Precedent in the United States Source of law Written sources are

More information

United States Constitution 101

United States Constitution 101 Constitution 101: An Introduction & Overview to the US Constitution United States Constitution 101 This PPT can be used alone or in conjunction with the Consortium s Goal 1 & 2 lessons, available in the

More information

Foundations of Government

Foundations of Government Class: Date: Foundations of Government Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. This is NOT a feature of all the states in today's

More information

UNIT II: THE U.S. CONSTITUTION

UNIT II: THE U.S. CONSTITUTION UNIT II: THE U.S. CONSTITUTION Seven Articles Separation of Powers Principles of Federalism Ilovesocialstudies.com SEVEN ARTICLES Article I Establishes the Legislative Branch Article II Establishes the

More information

D1 Constitution. Revised. The Constitution (1787) Timeline 2/28/ Declaration of Independence Articles of Confederation (in force 1781)

D1 Constitution. Revised. The Constitution (1787) Timeline 2/28/ Declaration of Independence Articles of Confederation (in force 1781) Revised D1 Constitution Timeline 1776 Declaration of Independence 1777 Articles of Confederation (in force 1781) 1789 United States Constitution (replacing the Articles of Confederation) The Constitution

More information

The Legislative Branch C H A P T E R S 2 A N D 7 E S S E N T I A L S O F A M E R I C A N G O V E R N M E N T R O O T S A N D R E F O R M

The Legislative Branch C H A P T E R S 2 A N D 7 E S S E N T I A L S O F A M E R I C A N G O V E R N M E N T R O O T S A N D R E F O R M The Legislative Branch C H A P T E R S 2 A N D 7 E S S E N T I A L S O F A M E R I C A N G O V E R N M E N T R O O T S A N D R E F O R M M S. CAMPBELL A P GOVERNMENT EDGREN HIGH SCHOOL Imagine for a moment

More information

CONSTITUTIONAL UNDERPINNINGS

CONSTITUTIONAL UNDERPINNINGS What Is Government? A government is composed of the formal and informal institutions, people, and used to create and conduct public policy. Public policy is the exercise doing those things necessary to

More information

Federal Constitution Study Guide

Federal Constitution Study Guide Name ID Card# Unit Federal Constitution Study Guide Article I Legislative Branch 1. The job of the legislative branch is to 2. The legislative branch is divided into two parts or two houses which are and

More information

The Constitution: From Ratification to Amendments. US Government Fall, 2014

The Constitution: From Ratification to Amendments. US Government Fall, 2014 The Constitution: From Ratification to Amendments US Government Fall, 2014 Origins of American Government Colonial Period Where did ideas for government in the colonies come from? Largely, from England

More information

Chapter 3: The Constitution Section 2

Chapter 3: The Constitution Section 2 Chapter 3: The Constitution Section 2 Objectives 1. Identify the four different ways by which the Constitution may be formally changed. 2. Explain how the formal amendment process illustrates the principles

More information

Three Branches of the American Government Packet

Three Branches of the American Government Packet Name: Three es of the American Government Packet THREE BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT Directions: Use the Civics in Action section in your book to complete the flow chart below by filling in the blanks with words

More information

The United States Constitution & The Illinois Constitution. Study Guide

The United States Constitution & The Illinois Constitution. Study Guide The United States Constitution & The Illinois Constitution Study Guide Test Date: Thursday, October 7, 2010 www.studystack.com/menu-279563 Separation of Powers: Checks & Balances Executive Legislative

More information

The Constitution. Name: The Law of the Land. What Does Our Constitution Look Like?

The Constitution. Name: The Law of the Land. What Does Our Constitution Look Like? The Law of the Land A constitution is a document that gives the rules for how a government should run. The Framers wrote our Constitution to create a government for the new United States of America. Creating

More information

A copy of the US Constitution is available at: or in the textbook

A copy of the US Constitution is available at:  or in the textbook Name Class Period AP Government : THE US CONSTITUTION STUDY GUIDE A copy of the US Constitution is available at: www.constitutioncenter.org or in the textbook Directions: Read the US Constitution and complete

More information

ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION TO THE CONSTITUTION

ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION TO THE CONSTITUTION ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION TO THE CONSTITUTION Articles of Confederation The representatives of the thirteen states agree to create a confederacy called the United States of America, in which each state

More information

THE US CONSTITUTION STUDY GUIDE Available at:

THE US CONSTITUTION STUDY GUIDE Available at: AP US Government & Politics Unit I: Constitutional Underpinnings and Federalism THE US CONSTITUTION STUDY GUIDE Available at: www.constitutioncenter.org PART I: THE OVERALL STRUCTURE OF THE CONSTITUTION

More information

23. Functions of Congress C ONGRESS performs several broad functions. Presumably the legislative, or law-making, is the most important. However, partl

23. Functions of Congress C ONGRESS performs several broad functions. Presumably the legislative, or law-making, is the most important. However, partl PART VI Congress 23. Functions of Congress C ONGRESS performs several broad functions. Presumably the legislative, or law-making, is the most important. However, partly because of the principle of checks

More information

UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION TEST REVIEW

UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION TEST REVIEW UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION TEST REVIEW The following questions will help you study for the U.S. Constitution Test. All questions on the test are not necessarily covered on these review sheets. Make sure

More information

Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation 1. Congress could not levy or collect taxes

Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation 1. Congress could not levy or collect taxes Virginia Plan New Jersey Plan The Great Compromise UNIT 2 TEST REVIEW SHEET Strengths of A of C 1- Established Federalism - A system of government where power is divided between a national government and

More information

Unit 2 Learning Objectives

Unit 2 Learning Objectives AP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Unit Two Part 2 The Constitution, and Federalism 2 1 Unit 2 Learning Objectives Structure of the Constitution 2.4 Describe the basic structure of the Constitution and its Bill of

More information

UNIT 2 TEST REVIEW SHEET. Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation 1. Congress could not levy or collect taxes

UNIT 2 TEST REVIEW SHEET. Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation 1. Congress could not levy or collect taxes Virginia Plan New Jersey Plan The Great Compromise UNIT 2 TEST REVIEW SHEET Strengths of A of C 1- Established Federalism - A system of government where power is divided between a national government and

More information

FEATURES OF THE US CONSTITUTION. Prepared by, Mr. Thomas G.M., Associate Professor Pompei College Aikala DK

FEATURES OF THE US CONSTITUTION. Prepared by, Mr. Thomas G.M., Associate Professor Pompei College Aikala DK FEATURES OF THE US CONSTITUTION Prepared by, Mr. Thomas G.M., Associate Professor Pompei College Aikala DK Introduction: It is the oldest written constitution in the world The Declaration of Independence

More information

The S e cope o e f f Congressi essi nal al P ower w s

The S e cope o e f f Congressi essi nal al P ower w s The Scope of Congressional Powers What are the three types of congressional power? How does strict construction of the U.S. Constitution on the subject of congressional power compare to liberal construction?

More information

Constitutional Foundations

Constitutional Foundations CHAPTER 2 Constitutional Foundations CHAPTER OUTLINE I. The Setting for Constitutional Change II. The Framers III. The Roots of the Constitution A. The British Constitutional Heritage B. The Colonial Heritage

More information

Constitution Practice Quiz

Constitution Practice Quiz 1 Which action illustrates the concept of checks and balances? (1) President Harry Truman issuing an executive order to desegregate the military (2) Congress overriding President Richard Nixon s veto of

More information

LESSON S OBJECTIVES Explain the powers that the const. Gives to congress Explain the enumerated powers of congress, the necessary and proper and

LESSON S OBJECTIVES Explain the powers that the const. Gives to congress Explain the enumerated powers of congress, the necessary and proper and Lesson 12.2 LESSON S OBJECTIVES Explain the powers that the const. Gives to congress Explain the enumerated powers of congress, the necessary and proper and general welfare clauses, and the reason for

More information

Unit 2 The Constitution

Unit 2 The Constitution Unit 2 The Constitution Objective 2.01: Identify principles in the United States Constitution. The Sections of the Constitution Preamble Explains why the Articles of Confederation were replaced, it also

More information

AP United States Government and Politics Constitution Breakdown

AP United States Government and Politics Constitution Breakdown AP United States Government and Politics Constitution Breakdown Part I: The United States Constitution Welcome to AP United States Government and Politics at Cooper High School. We will be using and referencing

More information

Lecture Outline: Chapter 2

Lecture Outline: Chapter 2 Lecture Outline: Chapter 2 Constitutional Foundations I. The U.S. Constitution has been a controversial document from the time it was written. A. There was, of course, very strong opposition to the ratification

More information

Chapter 6. APUSH Mr. Muller

Chapter 6. APUSH Mr. Muller Chapter 6 APUSH Mr. Muller Aim: How is the New Republic tested? Do Now: Thus I consent, sir, to this Constitution, because I expect no better, and because I am not sure that it is not the best. The opinions

More information

Credit-by-Exam Review US Government

Credit-by-Exam Review US Government Credit-by-Exam Review US Government Foundations and Ideas of the U.S. Government Characteristics and examples of limited government Characteristics and examples of unlimited government divine right unalienable

More information

9.1 Introduction: ingenious 9.2 The Preamble

9.1 Introduction: ingenious 9.2 The Preamble 9.1 Introduction: When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to convince their states to approve the document they had

More information

Creators of the Constitution

Creators of the Constitution Creators of the Constitution After the Revolutionary War, the thirteen former colonies joined together and in November 1777 formed a new government that was bound by an agreement called the Articles of

More information

Chapter 3. U.S. Constitution. THE US CONSTITUTION Unit overview. I. Six Basic Principles. Popular Sovereignty. Limited Government

Chapter 3. U.S. Constitution. THE US CONSTITUTION Unit overview. I. Six Basic Principles. Popular Sovereignty. Limited Government Chapter 3 U.S. Constitution THE US CONSTITUTION Unit overview I. Basic Principles II. Preamble III. Articles IV. Amendments V. Amending the Constitution " Original divided into 7 articles " 1-3 = specific

More information

AP Government Summer Assignment The United States Constitution Name Period

AP Government Summer Assignment The United States Constitution Name Period AP Government Summer Assignment The United States Constitution Name Period Directions: AP United States Government students should read the Constitution and complete the following questions directly on

More information

From Articles to Amendments: A study of the U.S. Constitution

From Articles to Amendments: A study of the U.S. Constitution From Articles to Amendments: A study of the U.S. Constitution Use the weblinks provided to answer the following questions: The Preamble What six reasons did the founding fathers give as the purpose for

More information

Magruder s American Government

Magruder s American Government Presentation Pro Magruder s American Government C H A P T E R 11 Powers of Congress 2001 by Prentice Hall, Inc. C H A P T E R 11 Powers of Congress SECTION 1 The Scope of Congressional Powers SECTION 2

More information

Unit 7 Our Current Government

Unit 7 Our Current Government Unit 7 Our Current Government Name Date Period Learning Targets (What I need to know): I can describe the Constitutional Convention and two compromises that took place there. I can describe the structure

More information

AP U.S. Government and Politics Summer Assignment CONSTITUTION REVIEW AND GUIDE

AP U.S. Government and Politics Summer Assignment CONSTITUTION REVIEW AND GUIDE AP U.S. Government and Politics Summer Assignment CONSTITUTION REVIEW AND GUIDE Instructor: Brandy M. Richmond Email: brichmond@irvingisd.net KIK: brichteach Twitter: brichteach Hello and welcome to AP

More information

Copyright 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman

Copyright 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Chapter 2: The Constitution The Origins of the Constitution The Government That Failed: 1776 1787 Making a Constitution: The Philadelphia Convention Critical Issues at the Convention The Madisonian System

More information

Constitution Basics. Power Theories Where does it come from and does it make a difference?

Constitution Basics. Power Theories Where does it come from and does it make a difference? Constitution Basics The Constitution, the document drafted more than 200 years ago, is what directs and structures our government. The Constitution is the supreme law of the land and is as essential to

More information

3 BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT

3 BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT 3 BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT EXECUTIVE BRANCH President, Vice President, Cabinet QUALIFICATIONS Written Qualifications 35 years old Lived in country for 14 years Natural-born citizen Unwritten Qualifications

More information

The Constitution of the. United States

The Constitution of the. United States The Constitution of the United States In 1215, a group of English noblemen forced King John to accept the (Great Charter). This document limited the powers of the king and guaranteed important rights to

More information

Social Studies Curriculum Guide Ninth Grade AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

Social Studies Curriculum Guide Ninth Grade AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Social Studies Curriculum Guide Ninth Grade AMERICAN GOVERNMENT It is the policy of the Fulton County School System not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age,

More information

Magruder s American Government

Magruder s American Government Presentation Pro Magruder s American Government C H A P T E R 10 Congress 2001 by Prentice Hall, Inc. C H A P T E R 10 Congress SECTION 1 The National Legislature SECTION 2 The House of Representatives

More information

Chapter 4: The United States Constitution

Chapter 4: The United States Constitution 1. Introduction Chapter 4: The United States Constitution One February morning in 1971, Dwight Lopez headed off to his classes at Central High School in Columbus, Ohio. Things had been tense at school

More information

Social Studies Curriculum High School

Social Studies Curriculum High School Mission Statement: American Government The Social Studies Department of Alton High School is committed to the following; assisting students in mastering and appreciating the principles of government, preparing

More information

[ 2.1 ] Origins of American Political Ideals

[ 2.1 ] Origins of American Political Ideals [ 2.1 ] Origins of American Political Ideals [ 2.1 ] Origins of American Political Ideals Key Terms limited government representative government due process bicameral unicameral [ 2.1 ] Origins of American

More information

Congress A. Carafiello

Congress A. Carafiello Congress A. Carafiello Essential Questions Why does the Constitution divide power between the two houses of Congress? What is a term of Congress? What are Congressional sessions? What benefits to members

More information

Constitution Day Lesson STEP BY STEP

Constitution Day Lesson STEP BY STEP Teacher s Guide Time Needed: One Class Period Materials Needed: Student worksheets Scissors and glue or tape (optional) Transparency or Projector (optional) Copy Instructions: Reading (4 pages; class set)

More information

The Origins of political thought and the Constitution

The Origins of political thought and the Constitution The Origins of political thought and the Constitution Social Contract Theory The implied agreement between citizens and the gov t saying that citizens will obey the gov t and give up certain freedoms in

More information

Rabalais AP Government Review Vocabulary List

Rabalais AP Government Review Vocabulary List Rabalais AP Government Review Vocabulary List Chapter 2 The Constitution Democracy Government by the people, both directly or indirectly, with free and frequent elections. Direct democracy Government in

More information

Arkansas Social Studies Curriculum Framework United States Government

Arkansas Social Studies Curriculum Framework United States Government A Correlation of 2016 To the Introduction This document demonstrates how Pearson Magruder s meets the for,. Citations are to the Student Edition. Hailed as a stellar educational resource since 1917, Pearson

More information

The Federal System. Chapter 4

The Federal System. Chapter 4 The Federal System Chapter 4 National and State Powers Section 1 Pages 95-102 The Division of Powers The Constitution divided power in the following ways: 1) The national government received certain specified

More information

The Federal System. Multiple-Choice Questions. 1. The party favored a strong national government.

The Federal System. Multiple-Choice Questions. 1. The party favored a strong national government. 3 The Federal System Multiple-Choice Questions 1. The party favored a strong national government. a. Anti-Federalist b. Federalist c. Libertarian d. Progressive e. Republican 2. In a system, local and

More information

help make the community a better place to live

help make the community a better place to live SOL Fast Facts for 8 th Grade Civics and Economics Unit 1 We the People: A Government of Citizens individual with certain rights and duties under a government and who, by birth or by choice, 1 citizen

More information

Government Semester Exam Review Sheet

Government Semester Exam Review Sheet Your Final Exam will come from these questions, with the addition of 6 from the Chapter 18 and 20 quizzes that you have yet to take. The answers are supplied on the last few pages. The exam will consist

More information

Student was able to identify the principles on which the U.S. Constitution was founded.

Student was able to identify the principles on which the U.S. Constitution was founded. U.S. Constitution Unit Learning Goal 9: Students will be able to explain the principles on which the U.S. Constitution was founded. - federalism (i.e., enumerated, reserved, and concurrent powers) - popular

More information

Constitutional Underpinnings of the U.S. Government

Constitutional Underpinnings of the U.S. Government U.S. Government What is the constitutional basis of separation of powers? It can be found in several principles, such as the separation of government into three branches, the conception that each branch

More information

Part I: The Federalist Papers

Part I: The Federalist Papers Wheaton High School AP United States Government and Politics Summer Assignment The AP U.S. Government & Politics Summer Assignment has been designed to give students: 1. A head start on the required course

More information

The Texas Constitution

The Texas Constitution The Texas Constitution Texas Constitutional History As the basic law outlining the primary structure and functions of a government, constitutions invariably reflect history and culture, and state constitutions

More information

The Constitution The SUPREME law of the land (R42-R67)

The Constitution The SUPREME law of the land (R42-R67) The Constitution The SUPREME law of the land (R42-R67) Structure and Principles Chapter 3 Section 1 Three Branches of Government Chapter 3 Section 2 The Constitution Has a division of powers as key principle

More information

Chapter 3: The Constitution

Chapter 3: The Constitution Chapter 3: The Constitution Section 1: A Blueprint for Government Section 2: An Enduring Document Section 3: Applying the Constitution Section 1 at a Glance A Blueprint for Government The Constitution

More information

The Articles of Confederation (Simplified) Approved by all 13 states between 1777 and 1781.

The Articles of Confederation (Simplified) Approved by all 13 states between 1777 and 1781. The Articles of Confederation (Simplified) Approved by all 13 states between 1777 and 1781. The Articles of Confederation has 13 sections called articles. This is a short summary of each article. Article

More information

Constitution of the Undergraduate Student Government of The Ohio State University

Constitution of the Undergraduate Student Government of The Ohio State University Preamble Constitution of the Undergraduate Student Government of The Ohio State University Amended by Student Body March 2013 W herein students have both the right and the obligation to guide their university,

More information

Chapter 6 Citizenship and the Constitution

Chapter 6 Citizenship and the Constitution Chapter 6 Citizenship and the Constitution Section Notes Understanding the Constitution The Bill of Rights Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship Quick Facts Separation of Powers Checks and Balances

More information

Chapter 5, Section 3 Creating the Constitution. Pages

Chapter 5, Section 3 Creating the Constitution. Pages Chapter 5, Section 3 Creating the Constitution Pages 163-168 It didn t take long for people to realize that the Articles of Confederation had many weaknesses. By the mid-1780s most political leaders agreed

More information

Popular Sovereignty. Limited Government. Separation of Powers. Checks and Balances. Judicial Review. Federalism

Popular Sovereignty. Limited Government. Separation of Powers. Checks and Balances. Judicial Review. Federalism U.S. Constitution distributes the powers of the National Government among Congress: the legislative branch makes laws President: the executive branch enforces laws Courts: the judicial branch interprets

More information

Module 1.2 U.S. Constitutional Framework. Constitutional Trivia! Overview of Lecture 6/4/2008

Module 1.2 U.S. Constitutional Framework. Constitutional Trivia! Overview of Lecture 6/4/2008 Module 1.2 U.S. Constitutional Framework Prof. Bryan McQuide University of Idaho Summer 2008 Constitutional Trivia! Which of the following Presidents signed the U.S. Constitution? George Washington John

More information

The Critical Period The early years of the American Republic

The Critical Period The early years of the American Republic The Critical Period 1781-1789 The early years of the American Republic America after the War New Political Ideas: - Greater power for the people Republic: Represent the Public America after the War State

More information

The Constitution: A More Perfect Union

The Constitution: A More Perfect Union The Constitution: A More Perfect Union How has the Constitution created a more perfect Union? P R E V I E W Read the quotation and answer the questions that follow. If men were angels, no government would

More information

1. States must meet certain requirements in drawing district boundaries. Identify one of these requirements.

1. States must meet certain requirements in drawing district boundaries. Identify one of these requirements. Multiple Choice 1. States must meet certain requirements in drawing district boundaries. Identify one of these requirements. a. A person's vote in the largest district of a state must have only half the

More information

THE ALMOST PAINLESS GUIDE TO THE U.S. CONSTITUTION #3401 Grades 5-Up Running Time: 20 minutes GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE PROGRAM

THE ALMOST PAINLESS GUIDE TO THE U.S. CONSTITUTION #3401 Grades 5-Up Running Time: 20 minutes GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE PROGRAM THE ALMOST PAINLESS GUIDE TO THE U.S. CONSTITUTION #3401 The Almost Painless Guide to the U.S. Constitution uses contemporary video footage, archival video footage and photographs, original graphics, and

More information

SAMPLE EXAMINATION ONE

SAMPLE EXAMINATION ONE SAMPLE EXAMINATION ONE SECTION I Time 45 minutes 60 Multiple-Choice Questions Directions: Each of the questions or incomplete statements below is followed by either four suggested answers or completions.

More information

Essential Questions - The Legislative Branch -What is the role of the Legislative Branch? -How doe Gerrymandering affect election outcomes?

Essential Questions - The Legislative Branch -What is the role of the Legislative Branch? -How doe Gerrymandering affect election outcomes? Essential Questions - The Legislative Branch -What is the role of the Legislative Branch? -How doe Gerrymandering affect election outcomes? -What are the powers of the legislative branch? -What influences

More information

Congress, Lobbyist, and the Legislative. Ch. 6 &7 SSCG 10 &11

Congress, Lobbyist, and the Legislative. Ch. 6 &7 SSCG 10 &11 Congress, Lobbyist, and the Legislative process Ch. 6 &7 SSCG 10 &11 Constitutional Powers Article 1, Section 8 of the Constitution spells out the powers of Congress. Congress has expressed powers, or

More information

CIVICS Participating in Government. Chapter Outlines CHAPTER 1

CIVICS Participating in Government. Chapter Outlines CHAPTER 1 CIVICS Participating in Government Chapter Outlines CHAPTER 1 Section 1: Who Americans Are Although American population patterns such as location, age, and occupation are changing, America remains a nation

More information

Terms of Congress is 2 years 1 st term March 1789, ended 1791

Terms of Congress is 2 years 1 st term March 1789, ended 1791 Chapter 10 Congress Section 1: National Legislature Bicameral congress 1. Historical Great Britain had one, most colonies as well 2. Practical compromise between big state and small state issue 3. Theoretical

More information