Test - Social Studies Grade 8 Unit 04: Writing the Constitution

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Test - Social Studies Grade 8 Unit 04: Writing the Constitution"

Transcription

1 Test - Social Studies Grade 8 Unit 04: Writing the Constitution Use the graphic organizer and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following 1. The Philadelphia Convention of 1787 would be considered part of which era? A. Constitutional Era B. Colonial Era C. Revolutionary Era D. Era of the Early Republic 2. Use the list and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. I. British Forces Are Defeated and the Revolutionary War Ends II. Philadelphia Convention Commences III. Second Continental Congress Meets IV. Election of First President of the United States What is the proper sequence of the events above? F. I, II, III, IV G. III, I, IV, II H. I, III, II, IV J. III, I, II, IV 3. Why is the year 1787 significant to U.S. history? A. The Articles of Confederation were repealed. B. The U.S. Constitution was written. C. Poor Richard's Almanack was first published. D. The Declaration of Independence was signed. 4. Use the list and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. What title would be appropriate for the above list? F. Declaration of Independence G. Articles of Confederation H. Federalist Papers J. Anti-Federalist Writings

2 question. Which of the following BEST completes the graphic organizer? A. Declaration of Independence B. Letters from a Federal Farmer C. Bill of Rights D. Federalist Papers 6. If you lived in Pennsylvania, how would you prefer that your representatives be chosen? F. number of representatives based on amount of population G. equal number for each state/colony H. older colonies get fewer representatives J. number of representatives changes each year 7. What can one infer about the relationship between the date of colonization and size of population? A. Earlier colonies had time to grow resulting in larger populations. B. Earlier colonies lost their population over the years. C. There appears to be no connection between the age of the colony and the size of population. D. The later colonies had larger populations. 8. Use the passage and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. Shortly after the defeat of General Braddock's army on July 9, 1755, a defeated but clearly exhilarated George Washington wrote an excited and reassuring account of the battle to his mother, Mary Ball Washington. Washington praised the Virginia soldiers for their "bravery," but condemned the British regulars who broke, and ran "as sheep pursued by dogs" for their "cowardice" and "dastardly behavior." The fortunes of war smiled down on Washington, as the young American escaped uninjured by hostile or friendly fire, although "I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me." -Washington Papers from Library of Congress Which of the following expresses how the above excerpt reflects society at the time of the beginning of the nation? F. Washington was depressed over the beginning of the new government. G. Letters became the archives of our first president, George Washington. H. There was great enthusiasm for the bravery of the colonists.

3 J. Washington knew that the British would be back for another war. 9. The Three-Fifths Compromise at the Constitutional Convention concerned which of the following issues? A. the counting of slaves for purposes of determining representation and taxation B. the establishment of upper and lower legislative bodies C. the manner in which bills and amendments would become law D. the portion of federal revenues that would come from large and small states 10. Use the excerpt and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. A people deliberating in a temperate moment on the plan of government most likely to secure their happiness, would first be aware that those charged with the public happiness might betray their trust. An obvious precaution against this danger would be to divide the trust between different bodies of men. James Madison The excerpt above was most likely written during which of the following? F. American Revolution G. colonization H. the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia J. election of At the Constitutional Convention, the Virginia Plan included a proposal for which of the following? A. separation of powers B. electoral college C. supreme court D. single house legislature 12. Use the list and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. Which amendment to the Bill of Rights best completes this sequence? F. Fourth Amendment G. Third Amendment H. Second Amendment J. First Amendment 13. Which right is guaranteed protection by the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution?

4 A. right to own firearms B. freedom to own property C. freedom from unreasonable searches D. right to a trial by jury of peers 14. Use the list and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. I. George Mason II. James Madison III. Alexander Hamilton IV. Patrick Henry Which individuals held the point of view of fearing a strong central government? F. I and III G. I and IV H. II and III J. I and II 15. Which of the following was described as a weakness of the Articles of Confederation? A. lack of an executive B. lack of judiciary C. inability to collect taxes D. all of the above 16. Use the quote and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. "The basis of our governments being the opinion of the people, the very first object should be to keep that rightí¾ and were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter." -- Thomas Jefferson to Edward Carrington, Which of the freedoms listed below is Jefferson expressing as an important liberty to limit tyranny? F. freedom from government G. freedom of the press H. right to bear arms J. freedom of religion 17. Use this list and your knowledge of social studies to answer the question that follows I. George Mason II. James Madison III. Alexander Hamilton

5 IV. Patrick Henry Which of the above held the point of view for a strong central government? A. I and II B. III and IV C. I and III D. II and III 18. Which of the following was the result of the Great Compromise? F. electoral college G. supreme court H. bicameral legislature J. amendment process 19. Which pair of speakers above is expressing the viewpoint of a Federalist? A. Speaker 1 and Speaker 4 B. Speaker 3 and Speaker 4 C. Speaker 2 and Speaker 3 D. Speaker 1 and Speaker Which pair of speakers above is expressing the viewpoint of an Anti-Federalist? F. Speaker 3 and Speaker 4 G. Speaker 1 and Speaker 2 H. Speaker 2 and Speaker 3 J. Speaker 1 and Speaker Which of the following was a grievance listed in the Declaration of Independence that led to the Third Amendment of the U.S. Constitution? A. imposing taxes without consent B. dissolving of representative legislatures C. cutting off trade with other nations D. quartering of troops

6 22. Use the quote and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offenses... This colonial grievance from the Declaration of Independence was addressed in which of the following? F. 1st Amendment G. 3rd Amendment H. 4th Amendment J. 6th and 7th Amendments 23. Anti-Federalists insisted upon which of the following? A. inclusion of slavery B. Virginia Plan C. Bill of Rights D. New Jersey Plan 24. The Federalist Papers were written to promote which of the following? F. Declaration of Independence G. the Constitution H. Three-Fifths Compromise J. Articles of Confederation 25. At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, one major disagreement concerned representation in the new national legislature. Complete the graphic organizer below to explain a) the position of large states and small states on this issue b) the compromise that was finally achieved and incorporated into the U.S. Constitution 26. Use the list and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. Select the man you believe to have BEST represented American ideals and leadership qualities during this

7 era. Give at least two examples from his actions. 27. Use the passage from #8 and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. Create a political cartoon that might demonstrate what Washington was saying in the excerpt. 28. Create a T-Chart with two arguments of the Federalists on the left side and two arguments of the Anti- Federalists on the right side. Then, place a star beside the argument that you think was the best on each side.

Unit 4 Writing the Constitution Concepts to Review

Unit 4 Writing the Constitution Concepts to Review Unit 4 Writing the Constitution Concepts to Review CAUSE AND EFFECTS OF MAJOR ERAS AND EVENTS IN U.S. HISTORY THROUGH 1877 Writing the Constitution Shays Rebellion Philadelphia Convention 1787 Great Compromise

More information

LESSON TWO: THE FEDERALIST PAPERS

LESSON TWO: THE FEDERALIST PAPERS LESSON TWO: THE FEDERALIST PAPERS OVERVIEW OBJECTIVES Students will be able to: Identify the Articles of Confederation and explain why it failed. Explain the argument over the need for a bill of rights

More information

Debating the Constitution

Debating the Constitution SECTION 3 A Bill of Rights A bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth, general or particular; and what no just government should refuse or rest on inference.

More information

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation Articles of Confederation Do Now How is power divided in our country today? SWBAT Analyze government problems under the Articles of Confederation Activity Review the Articles of Confederation chart and

More information

4 th Grade U.S. Government Study Guide

4 th Grade U.S. Government Study Guide 4 th Grade U.S. Government Study Guide Big Ideas: Imagine trying to make a new country from scratch. You ve just had a war with the only leaders you ve ever known, and now you have to step up and lead.

More information

Creating a Nation Test Review

Creating a Nation Test Review Creating a Nation Test Review Question #1: Multiple Choice The Northwest ordinance of 1787 is important because. A. It sent troops to the Northwest to protect the colonies from Native Americans. B. It

More information

Vocabulary Match-Up. Name Date Period Workbook Activity

Vocabulary Match-Up. Name Date Period Workbook Activity Name Date Period Workbook Activity Vocabulary Match-Up Chapter 2, Lesson 1 7 Part A Directions Match the vocabulary word in Column 1 with its definition in Column 2. Write the correct letter on each line.

More information

CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION

CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION Objectives Why did the Constitutional Convention draft a new plan for government? How did the rival plans for the new government differ? What other conflicts required the Framers

More information

What types of things did the new states do to make the governments more democratic?

What types of things did the new states do to make the governments more democratic? Chapter 8 Confederation to Constitution pg. 218 241 8 1 The Confederation Era pg. 221 225 Moving West and New State Governments Into which areas did American settlement expand in the late 1700s? What types

More information

Chapter Two: The Constitution

Chapter Two: The Constitution Chapter Two: The Constitution Learning Outcomes 1. Explain how the colonial experience prepared Americans for independence. 2. Discuss the restrictions that Britain placed on the colonies and the American

More information

CREATING A GOVERNMENT

CREATING A GOVERNMENT Let us not be afraid to view with a steady eye the dangers with which we are surrounded. Are we not on the eve of a war, which is only to be prevented by the hopes from this convention? CREATING A GOVERNMENT

More information

Foundations of the American Government

Foundations of the American Government Foundations of the American Government 1600s-1770s Each colony was loyal to Great Britain but was responsible for forming its own government, taxing and defending itself. The government and constitution

More information

The United States Constitution. The Supreme Law of the Land

The United States Constitution. The Supreme Law of the Land The United States Constitution The Supreme Law of the Land Standards SSUSH5 The student will explain specific events and key ideas that brought about the adoption and implementation of the United States

More information

Quarter One: Unit Four

Quarter One: Unit Four SS.7.C.1.5 Articles of Confederation ****At the end of this lesson, I will be able to do the following: Students will identify the weaknesses of the government under the Articles of Confederation (i.e.,

More information

Basic Concepts of Government The English colonists brought 3 ideas that loom large in the shaping of the government in the United States.

Basic Concepts of Government The English colonists brought 3 ideas that loom large in the shaping of the government in the United States. Civics Honors Chapter Two: Origins of American Government Section One: Our Political Beginnings Limited Government Representative government Magna Carta Petition of Right English Bill of Rights Charter

More information

Quarter One: Unit Four

Quarter One: Unit Four SS.7.C.1.5 Articles of Confederation ****At the end of this lesson, I will be able to do the following: Students will identify the weaknesses of the government under the Articles of Confederation (i.e.,

More information

The Constitution I. Considerations that influenced the formulation and adoption of the Constitution A. Roots 1. Religious Freedom a) Puritan

The Constitution I. Considerations that influenced the formulation and adoption of the Constitution A. Roots 1. Religious Freedom a) Puritan The Constitution I. Considerations that influenced the formulation and adoption of the Constitution A. Roots 1. Religious Freedom a) Puritan Theocracy (1) 9 of 13 had state church b) Rhode Island (1) Roger

More information

American Democracy Now Chapter 2: The Constitution

American Democracy Now Chapter 2: The Constitution American Democracy Now Chapter 2: The Constitution Multiple-Choice Questions: 1. Which of these countries employs an unwritten constitution? a. the United States b. Great Britain c. Venezuela d. Kenya

More information

Name: Date: Block: Notes:

Name: Date: Block: Notes: Chapter 2 Origins of American Government Section 1 a. Our Political Beginnings B. Basic Concepts of a. English brought idea of political system to America i. Ordered Government ii. iii. Restrict Government

More information

Name Class Date. MATCHING In the space provided, write the letter of the term or person that matches each description. Some answers will not be used.

Name Class Date. MATCHING In the space provided, write the letter of the term or person that matches each description. Some answers will not be used. Origins of American Government Section 1 MATCHING In the space provided, write the letter of the term or person that matches each description. Some answers will not be used. 1. Idea that people should

More information

Section 4 at a Glance The Constitutional Convention

Section 4 at a Glance The Constitutional Convention Section 4 at a Glance The Constitutional Convention At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, delegates debated competing plans the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan for how the new government

More information

The Constitution. Chapter 2 O Connor and Sabato American Government: Continuity and Change

The Constitution. Chapter 2 O Connor and Sabato American Government: Continuity and Change The Constitution Chapter 2 O Connor and Sabato American Government: Continuity and Change The Constitution In this chapter we will cover 1. The Origins of a New Nation 2. The Declaration of Independence

More information

NEW GOVERNMENT: CONFEDERATION TO CONSTITUTION FLIP CARD

NEW GOVERNMENT: CONFEDERATION TO CONSTITUTION FLIP CARD NEW GOVERNMENT: CONFEDERATION TO CONSTITUTION FLIP CARD Big Ideas: Imagine trying to make a new country from scratch. You ve just had a war with the only leaders you ve ever known, and now you have to

More information

FEDERALISTS, ANTI-FEDERALISTS AND THE CONSTITUTION SS.7.C.1.8

FEDERALISTS, ANTI-FEDERALISTS AND THE CONSTITUTION SS.7.C.1.8 FEDERALISTS, ANTI-FEDERALISTS AND THE CONSTITUTION SS.7.C.1.8 Explain the viewpoints of the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists regarding the ratification of the Constitution and inclusion of a bill of

More information

The Constitutional Convention. Chapter 2 Section 4

The Constitutional Convention. Chapter 2 Section 4 The Constitutional Convention Chapter 2 Section 4 Constitutional Convention May 1787 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 74 delegates allowed, 55 attended, 39 signed final Delegates to the Convention Had lots of

More information

FORMING A NEW GOVERNMENT

FORMING A NEW GOVERNMENT FORMING A NEW GOVERNMENT These questions are in random order. They will be in a different order in class tomorrow. Seven Principles Checks & Balances Federalism Individual Rights Limited Government Popular

More information

[ 2.1 ] Origins of American Political Ideals

[ 2.1 ] Origins of American Political Ideals [ 2.1 ] Origins of American Political Ideals [ 2.1 ] Origins of American Political Ideals Key Terms limited government representative government due process bicameral unicameral [ 2.1 ] Origins of American

More information

Convention. Guide to Reading

Convention. Guide to Reading Convention and Compromise Main Idea The new Constitution corrected the weaknesses of government under the Articles of Confederation. Key Terms depression, manumission, proportional, compromise 1784 Rhode

More information

Constitutional Convention

Constitutional Convention Constitutional Convention I INTRODUCTION Constitutional Convention, meeting during the summer of 1787 at which delegates from 12 states wrote the Constitution of the United States. At the convention in

More information

Constitutional Convention. May 1787

Constitutional Convention. May 1787 Constitutional Convention May 1787 Annapolis Convention September 11 to September 14, 1786 Annapolis, Maryland Purpose - How to fix the articles of confederation Alexander Hamilton (New York) MUST resolve

More information

CHAPTER 2 ORIGINS OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT SECTION 1: OUR POLITICAL BEGINNINGS

CHAPTER 2 ORIGINS OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT SECTION 1: OUR POLITICAL BEGINNINGS CHAPTER 2 ORIGINS OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT SECTION 1: OUR POLITICAL BEGINNINGS OUR POLITICAL BEGINNINGS Basic Concepts of Government Early settlers brought ideas of government or political systems with them.

More information

american History Semester Exam review (KEY)

american History Semester Exam review (KEY) american History Semester Exam review (KEY) 1. Fill in the name of each era and characteristics. Then use the word bank to match the events. 1. Exploration & Colonization 2. American Revolution 3. Creating

More information

LECTURE 3-3: THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION AND THE CONSTITUTION

LECTURE 3-3: THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION AND THE CONSTITUTION LECTURE 3-3: THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION AND THE CONSTITUTION The American Revolution s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government. I. Allegiances A.

More information

Parliament. Magna Carta ( ) A. Signed it. English Bill of Rights. Common Law. Vocabulary Magna Carta Rule of Law Due Process

Parliament. Magna Carta ( ) A. Signed it. English Bill of Rights. Common Law. Vocabulary Magna Carta Rule of Law Due Process Objective 1.1-1.1 - Identify the English documents that influence American colonial government Vocabulary 1.1 - Magna Carta Rule of Law Due Process Parliament English Bill of Rights Common Law precedent

More information

Colonization and Revolutionary War The Declaration of Independence

Colonization and Revolutionary War The Declaration of Independence Non-fiction: Colonization and Revolutionary War The Declaration of Independence Colonization and Revolutionary War The Declaration of Independence During the years right before the Revolutionary War, more

More information

The Coming of Independence. Ratifying the Constitution

The Coming of Independence. Ratifying the Constitution C H A P T E R 2 Origins of American Government 1 SECTION 1 SECTION 2 SECTION 3 SECTION 4 SECTION 5 Our Political Beginnings The Coming of Independence The Critical Period Creating the Constitution Ratifying

More information

Origins of American Government. Chapter 2

Origins of American Government. Chapter 2 Origins of American Government Chapter 2 Section 1 Essential Questions 1) What two principles of government came from the English heritage of the colonists? 2) What documents from England influenced the

More information

Colonization and Revolutionary War The Declaration of Independence

Colonization and Revolutionary War The Declaration of Independence Non-fiction: Colonization and Revolutionary War The Declaration of Independence Colonization and Revolutionary War The Declaration of Independence During the years right before the Revolutionary War, more

More information

The Critical Period The early years of the American Republic

The Critical Period The early years of the American Republic The Critical Period 1781-1789 The early years of the American Republic America after the War New Political Ideas: - Greater power for the people Republic: Represent the Public America after the War State

More information

Chapter 5, Section 3 Creating the Constitution. Pages

Chapter 5, Section 3 Creating the Constitution. Pages Chapter 5, Section 3 Creating the Constitution Pages 163-168 It didn t take long for people to realize that the Articles of Confederation had many weaknesses. By the mid-1780s most political leaders agreed

More information

If Men Were Angels: Teaching the Constitution With the Federalist Papers

If Men Were Angels: Teaching the Constitution With the Federalist Papers If Men Were Angels: Teaching the Constitution With the Federalist Papers Overview This lesson explores the Federalist Papers. First, students engage in a discussion about how they get information about

More information

The Constitution: From Ratification to Amendments. US Government Fall, 2014

The Constitution: From Ratification to Amendments. US Government Fall, 2014 The Constitution: From Ratification to Amendments US Government Fall, 2014 Origins of American Government Colonial Period Where did ideas for government in the colonies come from? Largely, from England

More information

Grade 7 History Mr. Norton

Grade 7 History Mr. Norton Grade 7 History Mr. Norton Section 1: A Loose Confederation Section 2: The Constitutional Convention Section 3: Ideas Behind the Constitution Section 4: Ratification and the Bill of Rights Grade 7 History

More information

Constitutional Convention

Constitutional Convention Constitutional Convention Members Principles Agreements and compromises The Constitutional Convention, 1787 u 55 delegates attended but on a typical day 35 were present u 29 held college degrees u 34 were

More information

Warm Up 12/3. Why did Shays Rebellion occur? What did it prove to many people? What did Alexander Hamilton and James Madison call for?

Warm Up 12/3. Why did Shays Rebellion occur? What did it prove to many people? What did Alexander Hamilton and James Madison call for? Warm Up 12/3 Why did Shays Rebellion occur? What did it prove to many people? What did Alexander Hamilton and James Madison call for? 1. How did many Americans feel about the Articles of Confederation?

More information

INTRODUCTION TO UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT: Foundations of U.S. Democracy. Constitutional Convention: Key Agreements and the Great Compromise

INTRODUCTION TO UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT: Foundations of U.S. Democracy. Constitutional Convention: Key Agreements and the Great Compromise Constitutional Convention: Key Agreements and the Great Compromise Virginia Plan proposed on May 29, 1787 This plan was also known as the Randolph Resolution, since it was proposed by Edmund Randolph of

More information

Unit 3 Section 1 Articles and Early Government.notebook. January 18, Vocabulary. Westward Ho! Need for State and National Government

Unit 3 Section 1 Articles and Early Government.notebook. January 18, Vocabulary. Westward Ho! Need for State and National Government 8.1 Vocabulary Wilderness Road Republic Articles of Confederation Land Ordinance of 1785 Northwest Territory Northwest Ordinance Shays's Rebellion Chapter Connection: Articles of Confederation were not

More information

Creating a Republic. Loose Confederation Constitutional Convention Ideas Behind the Constitution Ratification & Bill of Rights

Creating a Republic. Loose Confederation Constitutional Convention Ideas Behind the Constitution Ratification & Bill of Rights Creating a Republic Loose Confederation Constitutional Convention Ideas Behind the Constitution Ratification & Bill of Rights 7-1: Loose Confederation States Constitutions Articles of Confederation Weaknesses

More information

Ratification. By March 1781, all 13 Colonies had ratified the Articles of Confederation, making it the official written plan of government.

Ratification. By March 1781, all 13 Colonies had ratified the Articles of Confederation, making it the official written plan of government. The Goal To form a confederation of states - A Firm League of Friendship To continue the form of government established by the Second Continental Congress Ratification By March 1781, all 13 Colonies had

More information

A. As You Read. B. Reviewing Key Terms. Section 1 Guided Reading and Review Government and the State

A. As You Read. B. Reviewing Key Terms. Section 1 Guided Reading and Review Government and the State 1 Section 1 Guided Reading and Review Government and the State As you read Section 1, fill in the answers to the following questions. 1. What are the four characteristics of a state? a. b. c. d. 2. What

More information

Section Preview. Toward a New Constitution. Section Chapter 14: With Libery and Justice, the Federal Government

Section Preview. Toward a New Constitution. Section Chapter 14: With Libery and Justice, the Federal Government Section Preview As you read, look for: reasons for calling for a constitutional convention, important issues at the Constitutional Convention, method of amending the Constitution, basic principles of our

More information

CHAPTER 9 The Confederation and the Constitution,

CHAPTER 9 The Confederation and the Constitution, CHAPTER 9 The Confederation and the Constitution, 1776 1790 A. Checklist of Learning Objectives After mastering this chapter, you should be able to: 1. Explain the broad movement toward social and political

More information

AIM: How did the Articles of Confederation impact the U.S.?

AIM: How did the Articles of Confederation impact the U.S.? AIM: How did the Articles of Confederation impact the U.S.? Do Now: How do you think Hale Charter Academy would function if we got rid of the assistant principal, and the dean, and we allowed the individual

More information

Objectives: Students will be able to explain that the success and failures of the articles of confederation and be able to give some examples of each.

Objectives: Students will be able to explain that the success and failures of the articles of confederation and be able to give some examples of each. Day 1 Objectives: Students will be able to explain that the success and failures of the articles of confederation and be able to give some examples of each. Procedure: Do Now: Why is it important to have

More information

Chapter 7 Creating a Republic Powerpoint Questions ( ) Instructions:

Chapter 7 Creating a Republic Powerpoint Questions ( ) Instructions: Chapter 7 Creating a Republic Powerpoint Questions (1776-1790) Instructions: Use the Creating a Republic class notes and American Nation textbook, Pages 198-219 and your class notes to answer these questions.

More information

WARM UP. 1 Using the information from yesterday or new information collected using your ipad create a bubble map on the Constitutional Convention

WARM UP. 1 Using the information from yesterday or new information collected using your ipad create a bubble map on the Constitutional Convention WARM UP 1 Using the information from yesterday or new information collected using your ipad create a bubble map on the Constitutional Convention 2 Include people, dates, locations, facts and other information

More information

10/13/14 GOVERNMENT BY THE STATES OPPOSITION TO THE ARTICLES CHAPTER 5 THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES ( )

10/13/14 GOVERNMENT BY THE STATES OPPOSITION TO THE ARTICLES CHAPTER 5 THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES ( ) 1 CHAPTER 5 THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES (1776 1800) Mr. Anderson, M.Ed., J.D. GOVERNMENT BY THE STATES Early Gov t Articles of Confederation Set of laws to govern the U.S. most power w/ the states

More information

TAKS Diagnostic and Practice Tests

TAKS Diagnostic and Practice Tests Teacher s Edition Texas Assessment Consultant Sharon Sicinski Skeans Texas Consultant Sue Hudson Lubbock Independent School District Lubbock, Texas To the Teacher This booklet is designed to help students

More information

I. Politics in Action: Amending the Constitution (pp ) A. Flag desecration and Gregory Johnson B. A constitution is a nation s basic law.

I. Politics in Action: Amending the Constitution (pp ) A. Flag desecration and Gregory Johnson B. A constitution is a nation s basic law. CHAPTER 2 The Constitution CHAPTER OUTLINE I. Politics in Action: Amending the Constitution (pp. 31 32) A. Flag desecration and Gregory Johnson B. A constitution is a nation s basic law. II. The Origins

More information

Constitution Test Study Guide

Constitution Test Study Guide Constitution Test Study Guide Part One: Development of the Constitution Articles of Confederation: America's first government. The 13 states were loosely unified but the government was very weak, with

More information

Analyze the maps in Setting the Stage. Then answer the following questions and fill out the map as directed.

Analyze the maps in Setting the Stage. Then answer the following questions and fill out the map as directed. Geography Challenge G e o G r a p h y C h a l l e n G e Geography Skills Analyze the maps in Setting the Stage. Then answer the following questions and fill out the map as directed. 1. Label each state

More information

Chapter 2 The Constitution and the Founding. Copyright 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman

Chapter 2 The Constitution and the Founding. Copyright 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Chapter 2 The Constitution and the Founding A Republic At the close of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, Ben Franklin was queried as he left Independence Hall on the final day of deliberation. In

More information

Ratification of the Constitution. Issues

Ratification of the Constitution. Issues Graphic Organizer Ratification of the Constitution Federalists Anti- Federalists Issues Power of the national government State power Power of the Executive Branch A Bill of Rights Michigan Citizenship

More information

Oklahoma C 3 Standards for the Social Studies THE FOUNDATION, FORMATION, AND TRANSFORMATION OF THE AMERICAN SYSTEM OKLAHOMA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

Oklahoma C 3 Standards for the Social Studies THE FOUNDATION, FORMATION, AND TRANSFORMATION OF THE AMERICAN SYSTEM OKLAHOMA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION Oklahoma C 3 Standards for the Social Studies THE FOUNDATION, FORMATION, AND TRANSFORMATION OF THE AMERICAN SYSTEM P R E - K I N D E R G A R T E N T H R O U G H H I G H S C H O O L OKLAHOMA STATE BOARD

More information

Thomas Jefferson. Creating the Declaration of Independence

Thomas Jefferson. Creating the Declaration of Independence Thomas Jefferson Creating the Declaration of Independence The Age of The 18th-century Enlightenment was a movement marked by: an emphasis on rationality rather than tradition scientific inquiry instead

More information

Ch.8, Sec.2 Creating the Constitution

Ch.8, Sec.2 Creating the Constitution ü A al Convention Is Called - during the summer of 1787, 12 states sent delegates to Philadelphia to discuss amending the Articles of Confederation - the example set by Shays Rebellion proved our young

More information

Lesson 13 Writing and Ratifying the Constitution

Lesson 13 Writing and Ratifying the Constitution Lesson 13 Writing and Ratifying the Constitution Doct r. FRANKLIN looking towards the Presidents Chair, at the back of which a rising sun happened to be painted, observed to a few members near him, that

More information

STAAR STUDY GUIDE 2. Designated materials are the intellectual property of s3strategies, LLC. Permission is granted for internal district use only.

STAAR STUDY GUIDE 2. Designated materials are the intellectual property of s3strategies, LLC. Permission is granted for internal district use only. Dred Scott v. Sandford - Dred Scott, a southern slave, sues for his freedom. Court decision rules that: African Americans had no rights to citizenship & Congress could not limit a slave owner s control

More information

Chapter 2:4 Constitutional Convention

Chapter 2:4 Constitutional Convention Chapter 2:4 Constitutional Convention Psa_119:165 Great peace have they which love thy law: and nothing shall offend them. Objectives: 2:4 Our Political Beginnings o Students will examine the process that

More information

The Bill of Rights Institute

The Bill of Rights Institute Provides an introduction and overview of the Bill of Rights, including the Founders understanding of the rights of Englishmen, British law, and natural rights philosophy. This unit also examines the Federalist

More information

Unit 7 Our Current Government

Unit 7 Our Current Government Unit 7 Our Current Government Name Date Period Learning Targets (What I need to know): I can describe the Constitutional Convention and two compromises that took place there. I can describe the structure

More information

THE CONSTITUTION. How do societies balance individual and community rights? How does social change influence government?

THE CONSTITUTION. How do societies balance individual and community rights? How does social change influence government? CHAPTER 5 THE CONSTITUTION NGSSS SS.7.C.1.7 Describe how the Constitution limits the powers of government through separation of powers and checks and balances. ESSENTIAL QUESTION Why do people create,

More information

Indicate the answer choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Indicate the answer choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Indicate the answer choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. a. branches of powers. b. government triangle. c. separation of powers. d. social contract. 2. The English Bill

More information

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) 113.24. Social Studies, Grade 8. Category Student Expectation Strategy/Assessment (a) Introduction (1) In Grade 8, students study the history of the United States

More information

LEARNING OBJECTIVES After studying Chapter 2, you should be able to: 1. Discuss the importance of the English philosophical heritage, the colonial experience, the Articles of Confederation, and the character

More information

THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION. Ch 3-2

THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION. Ch 3-2 THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION Ch 3-2 By the end, the Constitutional Convention of 1787 had replaced the Articles of Confederation The new U.S. Constitution created a stronger, more complex national government

More information

Rat in the Bucket review game Unit 2. Foundations of American Government

Rat in the Bucket review game Unit 2. Foundations of American Government Rat in the Bucket review game Unit 2 Foundations of American Government QUESTION 1 We mutually pledge our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor This quote from the Declaration of Independence is considered.

More information

7/10/2009. The first political cartoon by Ben Franklin. What does it mean?

7/10/2009. The first political cartoon by Ben Franklin. What does it mean? The first political cartoon by Ben Franklin. What does it mean? 1 On the Eve of the Revolution? Britain Americans Advantages?? Disadvantages?? 2 The Revolutionary War began in April 1775 when British soldiers

More information

Ch. 8: Creating the Constitution

Ch. 8: Creating the Constitution Ch. 8: Creating the Constitution The Articles of Confederation After declaring independence from Britain in 1776, Congress tried to unite the states under one national government. However, many feared

More information

Creating the Constitution

Creating the Constitution Creating the Constitution Constitutional Convention Philadelphia 1787 Met in Secret Goal: Alter or abolish fix the old system or create a new one Needed to tweak the articles Focus of Convention Meeting

More information

Creating the Constitution

Creating the Constitution G e o g r a p h y C h a l l e n g e Creating the Constitution What compromises emerged from the Constitutional Convention? P R E V I E W On a separate sheet of paper, create a T-chart with the heads Articles

More information

Civics (History and Government) Questions for the Naturalization Test

Civics (History and Government) Questions for the Naturalization Test (rev. 01/17) Civics (History and Government) Questions for the Naturalization Test The 100 civics (history and government) questions and answers for the naturalization test are listed below. The civics

More information

Social Studies Content Expectations

Social Studies Content Expectations The fifth grade social studies content expectations mark a departure from the social studies approach taken in previous grades. Building upon the geography, civics and government, and economics concepts

More information

Chapter 6. APUSH Mr. Muller

Chapter 6. APUSH Mr. Muller Chapter 6 APUSH Mr. Muller Aim: How is the New Republic tested? Do Now: Thus I consent, sir, to this Constitution, because I expect no better, and because I am not sure that it is not the best. The opinions

More information

The States: Experiments in Republicanism State constitutions served as experiments in republican government The people demand written constitutions

The States: Experiments in Republicanism State constitutions served as experiments in republican government The people demand written constitutions The States: Experiments in Republicanism State constitutions served as experiments in republican government The people demand written constitutions provide clear definition of rights describe clear limits

More information

The Constitutional Convention

The Constitutional Convention Early United States I can describe how thirteen colonies evolved into the United States. 4 I can make inferences that go beyond what was taught in class or connect and explain the 3.0 learning targets

More information

Standard Indicator SOUTH CAROLINA AND THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION IN PHILADELPHIA

Standard Indicator SOUTH CAROLINA AND THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION IN PHILADELPHIA Standard Indicator 8-3.2 SOUTH CAROLINA AND THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION IN PHILADELPHIA ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION First plan of government for US Adopted during Revolutionary War Weak plan of government

More information

Chapter 8 and 9 Review

Chapter 8 and 9 Review Chapter 8 and 9 Review A constitution is a document that outlines the powers of government. Constitution (1787) James Madison formulated many of the ideas included in the Constitution and is known as the

More information

BILL OF RIGHTS TERMS. 1. U.S. Constitution 6. Ratify 2. Amendment 7. Petition 3. Citizen 8. Warrant 4. Quartering 9. Due Process 5. Jury 10.

BILL OF RIGHTS TERMS. 1. U.S. Constitution 6. Ratify 2. Amendment 7. Petition 3. Citizen 8. Warrant 4. Quartering 9. Due Process 5. Jury 10. BILL OF RIGHTS TERMS 1. U.S. Constitution 6. Ratify 2. Amendment 7. Petition 3. Citizen 8. Warrant 4. Quartering 9. Due Process 5. Jury 10. Prohibit A More Perfect Union Chart Person Who What Significance

More information

2. Which of the following was not one of the rights granted in the Magna Carta?

2. Which of the following was not one of the rights granted in the Magna Carta? 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Magruder s American Government C H A P T E R 2 Origins of American Government C H A P T E R 2 Origins of American Government SECTION 1 Our Political Beginnings SECTION 2 The Coming of Independence

More information

Constitutional Convention Unit Notes

Constitutional Convention Unit Notes Constitutional Convention Unit Notes Civics Textbook: Government and Society - Text p. 5 Cue four reasons why society needs a government Notes 1. Law and Order Government makes laws to protect citizens

More information

Creating Our. Constitution. Key Terms. delegates equal representation executive federal system framers House of Representatives judicial

Creating Our. Constitution. Key Terms. delegates equal representation executive federal system framers House of Representatives judicial Lesson 2 Creating Our Constitution Key Terms delegates equal representation executive federal system framers House of Representatives judicial What You Will Learn to Do Explain how the Philadelphia Convention

More information

The American Revolution

The American Revolution Main Idea The American Revolution Enlightenment ideas led to revolution, independence, and a new government for the United States. Content Statement 6/Learning Goal Describe how Enlightenment thinkers

More information

Convention and Compromise: Chapter 3, Section 2

Convention and Compromise: Chapter 3, Section 2 Convention and Compromise: Chapter 3, Section 2 A constitution reflects the values and goals of a society that creat it. The new Constitution corrected the weaknesses of government under the Articles of

More information

CHAPTER 2: REVOLUTION AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC

CHAPTER 2: REVOLUTION AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC CHAPTER 2: REVOLUTION AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC COLONIAL RESISTANCE AND REBELLION SECTION 1 England s Parliament and Big Ben The Proclamation of 1763 sought to halt the westward expansion of the colonist,

More information

AGS United States Government Michigan Grade 8 Grade Level Content Expectations

AGS United States Government Michigan Grade 8 Grade Level Content Expectations Correlated to Michigan Grade 8 Grade Level Content Expectations 5910 Rice Creek Pkwy, Suite 1000 Shoreview, MN 55126 Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. or its affiliate(s). All rights reserved. F1

More information

T H E C O N F E D E R A T I O N A N D T H E C O N S T I T U T I O N C H A P T E R 7 A P U S H I S T O R Y

T H E C O N F E D E R A T I O N A N D T H E C O N S T I T U T I O N C H A P T E R 7 A P U S H I S T O R Y T H E C O N F E D E R A T I O N A N D T H E C O N S T I T U T I O N C H A P T E R 7 A P U S H I S T O R Y LEARNING GOAL: Students will be able to explain the growth of the new governing systems in the

More information

Constitutional Convention

Constitutional Convention Constitutional Convention How did the United States overcome the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and provide for the organization of the new government? What role did compromise play in the

More information

Once a year, each state would select a delegation to send to the capital city.

Once a year, each state would select a delegation to send to the capital city. In November 1777, the Continental Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. This was a plan for a loose union of the states under Congress. Once a year, each state would select

More information

American Government. Unit 2 Study Guide

American Government. Unit 2 Study Guide American Government Unit 2 Study Guide Events leading up the Declaration of Independence: 1) Stamp Act- a tax placed on all printed material a. An attempt to earn money lost in the French and Indian War

More information