Test - Social Studies Grade 8 Unit 04: Writing the Constitution

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1 Test - Social Studies Grade 8 Unit 04: Writing the Constitution Use the graphic organizer and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following 1. The Philadelphia Convention of 1787 would be considered part of which era? A. Constitutional Era B. Colonial Era C. Revolutionary Era D. Era of the Early Republic 2. Use the list and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. I. British Forces Are Defeated and the Revolutionary War Ends II. Philadelphia Convention Commences III. Second Continental Congress Meets IV. Election of First President of the United States What is the proper sequence of the events above? F. I, II, III, IV G. III, I, IV, II H. I, III, II, IV J. III, I, II, IV 3. Why is the year 1787 significant to U.S. history? A. The Articles of Confederation were repealed. B. The U.S. Constitution was written. C. Poor Richard's Almanack was first published. D. The Declaration of Independence was signed. 4. Use the list and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. What title would be appropriate for the above list? F. Declaration of Independence G. Articles of Confederation H. Federalist Papers J. Anti-Federalist Writings

2 question. Which of the following BEST completes the graphic organizer? A. Declaration of Independence B. Letters from a Federal Farmer C. Bill of Rights D. Federalist Papers 6. If you lived in Pennsylvania, how would you prefer that your representatives be chosen? F. number of representatives based on amount of population G. equal number for each state/colony H. older colonies get fewer representatives J. number of representatives changes each year 7. What can one infer about the relationship between the date of colonization and size of population? A. Earlier colonies had time to grow resulting in larger populations. B. Earlier colonies lost their population over the years. C. There appears to be no connection between the age of the colony and the size of population. D. The later colonies had larger populations. 8. Use the passage and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. Shortly after the defeat of General Braddock's army on July 9, 1755, a defeated but clearly exhilarated George Washington wrote an excited and reassuring account of the battle to his mother, Mary Ball Washington. Washington praised the Virginia soldiers for their "bravery," but condemned the British regulars who broke, and ran "as sheep pursued by dogs" for their "cowardice" and "dastardly behavior." The fortunes of war smiled down on Washington, as the young American escaped uninjured by hostile or friendly fire, although "I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me." -Washington Papers from Library of Congress Which of the following expresses how the above excerpt reflects society at the time of the beginning of the nation? F. Washington was depressed over the beginning of the new government. G. Letters became the archives of our first president, George Washington. H. There was great enthusiasm for the bravery of the colonists.

3 J. Washington knew that the British would be back for another war. 9. The Three-Fifths Compromise at the Constitutional Convention concerned which of the following issues? A. the counting of slaves for purposes of determining representation and taxation B. the establishment of upper and lower legislative bodies C. the manner in which bills and amendments would become law D. the portion of federal revenues that would come from large and small states 10. Use the excerpt and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. A people deliberating in a temperate moment on the plan of government most likely to secure their happiness, would first be aware that those charged with the public happiness might betray their trust. An obvious precaution against this danger would be to divide the trust between different bodies of men. James Madison The excerpt above was most likely written during which of the following? F. American Revolution G. colonization H. the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia J. election of At the Constitutional Convention, the Virginia Plan included a proposal for which of the following? A. separation of powers B. electoral college C. supreme court D. single house legislature 12. Use the list and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. Which amendment to the Bill of Rights best completes this sequence? F. Fourth Amendment G. Third Amendment H. Second Amendment J. First Amendment 13. Which right is guaranteed protection by the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution?

4 A. right to own firearms B. freedom to own property C. freedom from unreasonable searches D. right to a trial by jury of peers 14. Use the list and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. I. George Mason II. James Madison III. Alexander Hamilton IV. Patrick Henry Which individuals held the point of view of fearing a strong central government? F. I and III G. I and IV H. II and III J. I and II 15. Which of the following was described as a weakness of the Articles of Confederation? A. lack of an executive B. lack of judiciary C. inability to collect taxes D. all of the above 16. Use the quote and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. "The basis of our governments being the opinion of the people, the very first object should be to keep that rightí¾ and were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter." -- Thomas Jefferson to Edward Carrington, Which of the freedoms listed below is Jefferson expressing as an important liberty to limit tyranny? F. freedom from government G. freedom of the press H. right to bear arms J. freedom of religion 17. Use this list and your knowledge of social studies to answer the question that follows I. George Mason II. James Madison III. Alexander Hamilton

5 IV. Patrick Henry Which of the above held the point of view for a strong central government? A. I and II B. III and IV C. I and III D. II and III 18. Which of the following was the result of the Great Compromise? F. electoral college G. supreme court H. bicameral legislature J. amendment process 19. Which pair of speakers above is expressing the viewpoint of a Federalist? A. Speaker 1 and Speaker 4 B. Speaker 3 and Speaker 4 C. Speaker 2 and Speaker 3 D. Speaker 1 and Speaker Which pair of speakers above is expressing the viewpoint of an Anti-Federalist? F. Speaker 3 and Speaker 4 G. Speaker 1 and Speaker 2 H. Speaker 2 and Speaker 3 J. Speaker 1 and Speaker Which of the following was a grievance listed in the Declaration of Independence that led to the Third Amendment of the U.S. Constitution? A. imposing taxes without consent B. dissolving of representative legislatures C. cutting off trade with other nations D. quartering of troops

6 22. Use the quote and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offenses... This colonial grievance from the Declaration of Independence was addressed in which of the following? F. 1st Amendment G. 3rd Amendment H. 4th Amendment J. 6th and 7th Amendments 23. Anti-Federalists insisted upon which of the following? A. inclusion of slavery B. Virginia Plan C. Bill of Rights D. New Jersey Plan 24. The Federalist Papers were written to promote which of the following? F. Declaration of Independence G. the Constitution H. Three-Fifths Compromise J. Articles of Confederation 25. At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, one major disagreement concerned representation in the new national legislature. Complete the graphic organizer below to explain a) the position of large states and small states on this issue b) the compromise that was finally achieved and incorporated into the U.S. Constitution 26. Use the list and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. Select the man you believe to have BEST represented American ideals and leadership qualities during this

7 era. Give at least two examples from his actions. 27. Use the passage from #8 and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. Create a political cartoon that might demonstrate what Washington was saying in the excerpt. 28. Create a T-Chart with two arguments of the Federalists on the left side and two arguments of the Anti- Federalists on the right side. Then, place a star beside the argument that you think was the best on each side.

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