PEARSON COMMON CORE. Literature FLORIDA. Florida Health and Social Studies Connections. Upper saddle river, New Jersey boston, Massachusetts

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1 Literature PEARSON COMMON CORE FLORIDA Florida Health and Social Studies Connections GRADEs 9-12 Upper saddle river, New Jersey boston, Massachusetts ChanDler, Arizona glenview, Illinois

2 Interpreting Dimensions of Health HE.912.C.1.2 Interpret the significance of interrelationships in mental/emotional, physical, and social health. Explanation Your health dimensions physical, mental/emotional, social, and intellectual are like puzzle pieces that need to be fitted together to make meaning. Attaining a harmonious balance between mind and body can prove to be quite difficult. Greater understanding of the role that the dimensions of health play in our lives and how the dimensions are interrelated can lead us to what we seek the most health and happiness. Examples Here are some examples of students with healthy and unhealthy dimensions of health: Healthy: Wendell is invited to a party where he thinks that teenagers will be drinking. He considers the risks he might encounter if he goes: he could get in trouble for being at a party with underage drinking, he could get pressured into drinking, or he might find himself without a safe way to get home. He realizes any one of those problems would affect multiple dimensions of his health, so he sees a movie with friends instead. He has a good time without harming his health. Unhealthy: Eva avoids studying for an important test. When she receives a failing grade on the test, her class grade suffers. Now she cannot play soccer until she brings the grade up. Eva s mental/emotional and social health are lowered because she is sad she cannot play soccer with her friends and is stressed about school. Her physical health is also negatively affected because she is less active. One unhealthy choice led to several negative consequences. Academic Vocabulary dimensions an aspect or feature of a situation, problem, or thing physical of or relating to the body mental of or relating to the mind social of or relating to society or its organization Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the following texts to the practice activity that appears on the following page. The Scarlet Ibis, by James Hurst The Necklace, by Guy de Maupassant Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to help you apply the standard. You may opt to complete the worksheet that follows with information you learned from the texts cited above. 1

3 Name Date Selection(s) Interpreting Dimensions of Health Fill in the worksheet with examples of health-related situations from real-life, or from fiction or your imagination. Then, describe how other dimensions of health are affected by the situation and behavior. Situation and Behaviors How Other Dimensions of Health Are Affected Situation and Behaviors How Other Dimensions of Health Are Affected Situation and Behaviors How Other Dimensions of Health Are Affected 2

4 Media s Influence on Health HE.912.C.2.5 Evaluate the effect of media on personal and family health. Explanation Media can affect your personal health and your family s health. Constant exposure to media messages (delivered via media such as television, internet, video games, movies, music, magazines, and advertisements) can influence how you and your family think or act. Sometimes media has a positive influence on people, but at other times, it can have a negative influence. Remember that you and your family have control over many influences in your lives. Examples Here are some examples of how media can positively and negatively influence personal and family health. Positive influence: Fernando watched a documentary about music programs offered in schools. The filmmakers claimed that learning to play an instrument helps students to avoid boredom and to improve the quality of their lives. That spring, Fernando signed up for trumpet lessons and by the fall qualified to play in the school concert band. Fernando made new friends and even saw an improvement in his grades. Negative influence: Carly noticed that characters on her favorite television show always wore extremely high heeled shoes. Because she wanted to be like those characters, she started wearing high heels as often as she could. Within a year, Carly developed painful bunions on her feet and her lower back started to ache. Academic Vocabulary evaluate judge; determine media providers of news and information to the public Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the following text to the practice activity that appears on the following page. My Possessions, Myself, by Russell Belk Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to help you apply the standard. You may opt to complete the worksheet that follows with information you learned from the text cited above. 3

5 Name Date Selection(s) Media s Influence on Health Provide one example in which media has a positive effect on self or family. Then, provide an example in which media has a negative effect. Media Segment Positive Effect on Self or on Family Media Segment Negative Effect on Self or on Family 4

6 Monitor Current Public Issues in Florida SS.912.C.2.10 Monitor current public issues in Florida. Explanation One of your responsibilities as a citizen of the state of Florida is to keep up with the latest news. By monitoring current public issues in Florida, you can learn about people and ideas from around the state. By learning more, you may decide that you want to get involved in helping to solve problems in your community! Example One example of an issue of particular concern to Floridians is the spread of Burmese pythons in the Everglades. The estimated population of pythons in the Everglades is between 5,000 and 180,000, and they are now considered to be an invasive species. In 2013, a Burmese python hunting competition was held, sponsored by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Almost 70 pythons were caught during the month-long event. This problem will require much more thought and action in order to be brought under control. Academic Vocabulary issues important topics or problems for debate or discussion monitor keep watch over; listen to and report on responsibility a duty or obligation to satisfactorily perform or complete a task Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to apply your knowledge of the standard. You may want to work individually or with a small group to complete the worksheet. 5

7 Name Date Selection(s) Monitor Current Public Issues in Florida Perform research to find a Florida-related issue of interest to you. Use the following worksheet to record the history of this issue, to tell about the people involved, and to outline the solutions that are currently being proposed. Then write your own proposal for a solution. Issue: History of the Issue People or Groups Involved with the Issue Solutions Currently Being Proposed Write your own proposal for a solution to this issue. 6

8 Analyze Public Policy Solutions SS.912.C.2.11 Analyze public policy solutions or courses of action to resolve a local, state, or federal issue. Explanation Public policy is the attempt by a government to address a public issue by instituting laws, regulations, decisions, or actions in order to solve a problem. Public policy solutions attempt to resolve local, state, and federal issues. When lawmakers and judges decide whether to pass legislation, to give prominence to a particular political position, or to make a judgment about an issue, past and present public policy influences their decisions. Examples The world that you live in is a product of many different public policies some local, some state, and some federal. One example of policy that is handled at the state level is the regulation of drivers. One aspect of this public policy is that elderly drivers are re-tested more frequently than other drivers in certain states. This policy is opposed by some people and groups and supported by others. Other examples of public policy include foreign policy (federal), education policy (mostly state and local), and crime policy (federal, state, and local). Academic Vocabulary federal relating to a form of government in which a union of states recognizes the authority of a central authority issues important topics or problems for debate or discussion public policy the course of action adopted and pursued by local, state, and federal governments solutions the means of solving a problem or dealing with a difficult situation Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the texts listed below to the practice activity that appears on the following page. from The Federalist, No. 2, by John Jay Remarks to the Senate in Support of a Declaration of Conscious, by Margaret Chase Smith Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to apply your knowledge of the standard. You may opt to complete the activity with knowledge you gained from reading the texts cited above. 7

9 Name Date Selection(s) Analyze Public Policy Solutions Perform research to find out more about a public policy solution or course of action that resolved a local, state, or federal issue. How does the public policy affect the lives of citizens? How do you think this public policy might be changed in the future? Use the following worksheet to assemble the information you gather, and then write a paragraph stating your opinion about how the policy might change in the future. Public Policy You Chose: How does this public policy affect the lives of citizens? Write a paragraph stating your opinion about how this public policy might change in the future. 8

10 Justify the Validity of Technologies to Gather Health Information HE.912.B.3.3 Justify the validity of a variety of technologies to gather health information. Explanation How do you justify the validity of technologies that are used to gather health information? Is there a way to prove that the source you are using to gather health information is valid? In order to gather health information that you can trust to be accurate, you need to know how to prove that the technology you are using provides valid information or results. Examples Here are some examples of students who used different technologies to gather health information and tried to justify the validity of the technologies they used. Gustaf is writing a report on accident and injury prevention for his health class, and he wants to focus on how to avoid sports-related injuries. He decides to focus on a.gov website, which he knows will provide current and reliable information. Gustaf searches (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) and finds a few articles with information on injury and accident prevention. He knows that the information on this web site is valid because it is all supported by references and scientific studies. Annika is helping her dad look for a cell phone app to manage his diabetes. Her dad wants something portable that can help him monitor his symptoms and give him medication alerts and reminders. Annika decides to research several different apps to find if the data each provides is valid and trusted. During her research, Annika finds a scientific study about two of the apps that showed serious faults in two of the important features her dad is looking for. Neither of these apps could be justified as valid, so Annika tells her dad that she thinks asking their doctor to recommend a trusted app might be a good idea. Academic Vocabulary justify to prove or show to be just, right, or reasonable validity truthfulness; the ability of a test to measure correctly as intended technologies plural of technology; manner of accomplishing a task especially using technical processes, methods, or knowledge Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the following texts to the practice activity that appears on the following page. Seeing Things, by John McCrone The Censors, by Luisa Valenzuela Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to help you apply the standard. You may opt to make connections between this activity and either of the texts cited above. 9

11 Name Date Selection(s) Justify the Validity of Technologies to Gather Health Information Fill out the chart below with various types of technology you could use to gather health information. Then, complete the right-hand column with examples of types of health information you might gather and ways in which the use of technological resources is justified. Technology Used to Gather Health Information Examples and Details Type of information to be gathered: How to justify the validity of the technology: Type of information to be gathered: How to justify the validity of the technology: Type of information to be gathered: How to justify the validity of the technology: 10

12 The Value of Making Thoughtful Health-Related Decisions HE.912.B.5.1 Determine the value of applying a thoughtful decision-making process in health-related decisions. Explanation Important decisions that affect your health or the health of others require thoughtful decision-making that could result in improved health or the avoidance of an unhealthy or potentially dangerous situation. What is the value in applying a thoughtful decisionmaking process when your health or someone else s health is at stake? Examples Think about the value of applying thoughtful decision-making in each of these health-related situations: Bruno and four of his friends are playing basketball after school when it starts pouring. The friends all run for shelter to wait out the rain when one of the friends exclaims, You guys! My brother just got his license. I m going to text him and tell him we need a ride. We can all pile in the car and then we don t have to walk in the rain. Jana and Mila both like to swim. Mila discovered a lake that is not far from her house. The two of them hike over to check it out one sunny Saturday afternoon. When they get to the lake, the water looks clear and inviting. There s a rope tied to a branch of a tree that hangs over the lake. Mila says, It would be fun to swing out on that rope and drop into the water. Jana, you re the brave one. You go first. Academic Vocabulary determine to settle or decide by choice of alternatives or possibilities apply put to use process a series of actions leading to a result Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the following texts to the practice activity that appears on the next page. A Problem, Anton Chekhov Contents of the Dead Man s Pocket, by Jack Finney from The Upside of Quitting, by Stephen J. Dubner Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to help you apply the standard. As an option, you may want to explore this standard by completing the worksheet with information you learned from reading the texts cited above. 11

13 Name Date Selection(s) The Value of Making Thoughtful Health-Related Decisions Fill out the worksheet by listing real-life, fictional, or imagined situations that led to decision-making. Then, describe the impact of the decision. Situation (Real, Fictional, or Imagined) Health-Related Decision and Impact 12

14 Monitor Current Public Issues in Florida SS.912.C.2.10 Monitor current public issues in Florida. Explanation One way that you can fulfill your civic duty as a citizen of the state of Florida is to be informed about public issues. By monitoring current public issues in Florida, you can learn about people, problems, programs, and solutions that are at the forefront in various communities. Learning about a solution to a particular issue may spark your interest in learning more about the various public issues facing Floridians every day. Example One example of a recent issue important to Floridians is the spread of the giant African land snail. First spotted in Florida in 2011, these huge mollusks can grow to the size of a rat. They can eat their way through the stucco and plastic in homes and will consume large amounts of vegetation. They have no known natural predators and a snail can produce, on average, 1,200 eggs per year. Without a coordinated program to curtail their spread, African land snails will soon spread across certain areas in southern Florida. Academic Vocabulary civic duty the responsibilities of a citizen issues important topics or problems for debate or discussion monitor keep watch over; listen to and report on Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to apply your knowledge of the standard. You may want to work individually or with a small group to complete the worksheet. 13

15 Name Date Selection(s) Monitor Current Public Issues in Florida Perform research to find a Florida-related issue of interest to you. Use the following worksheet to describe the issue, to explain what might happen if the issue is ignored or not dealt with, and to outline possible solutions. Issue: Describe the Issue Explain What Might Happen If the Issue Is Not Dealt With Outline Possible Solutions to the Problem 14

16 Analyze Public Policy Solutions SS.912.C.2.11 Analyze public policy solutions or courses of action to resolve a local, state, or federal issue. Explanation Governments implement public policies in order to enact laws, regulations, decisions, or actions in order to solve problems. Public policy solutions attempt to solve local, state, and federal problems. Present public policy decisions can be affected by past public policy in turn, once enacted, present public policy can affect future public policy outcomes. Example Political decisions help craft public policies some public policies are local, some are state, and still others are federal. One example of policy that is handled at the local level is the recent attempt by some local governments to tax nonprofit organizations. During the recent economic downturn, many cities who prior to that had not expected nonprofit organizations to pay taxes began to ask nonprofits to pay fees or taxes. Nonprofits objected, claiming that they served the public and paid a public debt through their actions and operations. Some cities and towns felt that nonprofits needed to begin to contribute more to public coffers. Different cities and towns have enacted different public policies to deal with this issue. Academic Vocabulary federal relating to a form of government in which a union of states recognizes the authority of a central authority public policy the course of action adopted and pursued by local, state, and federal governments solutions the means of solving a problem or dealing with a difficult situation Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the texts listed below to the practice activity that appears on the following page. Atoms for Peace, by Dwight D. Eisenhower from Duty, Honor, Country, by Douglas MacArthur Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to apply your knowledge of the standard. You may opt to complete the activity with knowledge you gained from reading the texts cited above. 15

17 Name Date Selection(s) Analyze Public Policy Solutions Perform research to find out more about a local, state, or federal problem in need of a public policy solution. Who might be affected by any possible public policy solutions? What are some different solutions that might solve this problem? Use the following worksheet to assemble the information you gather, and then write a paragraph stating your opinion about the best policy solution to the problem you identified. Local, State, or Federal Problem You Chose: Who might be affected by any possible public policy solutions? What are some different solutions that might solve this problem? Write a paragraph stating your opinion about the best policy solution to the problem you identified. 16

18 Enhancing Health with Effective Communication HE.912.B.4.1 Explain skills needed to communicate effectively with family, peers, and others to enhance health. Explanation Communication skills are the skills you use to convey feelings and information to others. Your ability to communicate with family, friends, and others affects both your personal health and the health of those around you. Knowing the skills needed in order to communicate effectively can help you build and maintain healthy relationships with family, peers, and others, as well as improve your own health. Examples Here are some examples of effective communication skills. Eddie is struggling in history class. He meets with his teacher and asks how he can do better. His teacher gives him some ideas and introduces him to a peer tutor. After following his teacher s advice and working with the peer tutor, Eddie s history grade improves. He maintains a good relationship with his teacher and builds a successful relationship with his tutor. His effective communication skills have positively affected his health. Jenny has been asked to represent her school at a national tennis conference. The conference is in another state, and Jenny has a secret fear of flying. She is happy to be chosen but terrified of traveling. Jenny considers withdrawing from the conference, but instead decides to talk to her coach about her fear. The coach arranges for a meeting with Jenny and her parents. They enroll Jenny in a workshop designed to help people overcome flying fears. After a few weeks, Jenny feels much better about flying and is able to successfully make the trip. Academic Vocabulary communicate to exchange information or feelings effectively successfully enhance improve Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the following texts to the practice activity that appears on the following page. The Minister s Black Veil, by Nathaniel Hawthorne A Wagner Matinee, by Willa Cather Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to help you apply the standard as you read. You may opt to complete the practice worksheet as if you were a character from one of the texts cited above. 17

19 Name Date Selection(s) Enhancing Health with Effective Communication Complete the worksheet by listing three examples of effective communication relating to health issues. Your examples may be drawn from real life, from fiction, or from your imagination. Example 1: Communication Skills Used in Interactions With Others: Example 2: Communication Skills Used in Interactions With Others: Example 3: Communication Skills Used in Interactions With Others: 18

20 Reducing Health Risks HE.912.B.4.2 Assess refusal, negotiation, and collaboration skills to enhance health and avoid or reduce health risks. Explanation Every day, you make decisions about your health. Assessing the effectiveness of refusal skills (saying no ), negotiation skills (suggesting an alternative to what you are refusing), and collaboration skills (working together to reach a better solution) can help you make decisions that reduce health risks and lead to enhanced health. Examples Here are some examples of effective refusal, negotiation, and collaboration skills and ineffective refusal, negotiation, and collaboration skills. Refusal Skill: Jawal has a horrible headache. His friend offers Jawal some pain medication that he was given by his doctor. Jawal declines the offer, knowing that taking prescription medications that are meant for someone else poses a huge health risk. Negotiation Skill: The drama club at school is planning an end-of-school picnic. The food committee creates a menu that includes burgers, hot dogs, chips, and colas. Deena is worried that the menu is too limited. She asks the group to adapt the menu so that vegetarians and health-conscious eaters can also join in the fun. She offers to work with the school to get additional money to provide for veggie burgers, fruits, and vegetables. Collaboration Skill: The Juarez family is sad to discover that the local playground has become overrun with trash and mosquitoes. They realize that mosquitos can transmit disease. Rather than give up on the playground, the family enlists the help of local volunteers and organizes a playground clean-up day. Academic Vocabulary refusal unwillingness to do or accept something negotiation discussion between opposing sides collaboration working together with another person or group enhance improve Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the following texts to the practice activity that appears on the following page. from Civil Disobedience, by Henry David Thoreau A Worn Path, by Eudora Welty Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to help you apply the standard. You may opt to complete the worksheet that follows with information related to the texts cited above. 19

21 Name Date Selection(s) Reducing Health Risks Complete the chart by describing situations from real life, from fiction, or from your imagination. Then, provide detail about the skill(s) used to eliminate risks to health. Situation Involving Health Risk Refusal, Negotiation, or Collaboration Skill Used Situation Involving Health Risk Refusal, Negotiation, or Collaboration Skill Used Situation Involving Health Risk Refusal, Negotiation, or Collaboration Skill Used 20

22 Evaluate the Ideals and Principles of Founding Documents SS.912.C.1.3 Evaluate the ideals and principles of the founding documents (Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, Federalist Papers) that shaped American Democracy. Explanation The basic principles of American political ideals include concepts such as separation of powers, popular sovereignty, checks and balances, judicial review, federalism, and limited government. Several of the founding documents the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Federalist Papers provide insight into the struggles of early American leaders with these concepts. Keep in Mind... Several examples of the basics principles of American ideals as embodied in the founding documents are as follows: Popular sovereignty is the belief that governments are legitimate if they reflect the will or consent of the governed the people are the source of political power. One line from the Declaration of Independence that states this belief is Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. The title of The Federalist No. 51 is The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances. Checks and balances are forces or influences within a government that counterbalance one another. The Articles of Confederation offered no system of courts and established no independent judiciary or system of judicial review. States could ignore anything they disagreed with, even if mandated by Congress because there was no way to enforce Congress s laws. Academic Vocabulary popular sovereignty the belief that governments are legitimate if they reflect the will or consent of the governed checks and balances forces or influences within a government that counterbalance one another judicial review review by courts of the constitutional validity of a legislative act separation of powers the system of placing in separate branches the executive, legislative, and judicial powers of a government federalism a system of government in which power is divided between a central authority and other political units limited government a government whose power to intervene in civil liberties is restricted by law, usually in a written constitution 21

23 Name Date Selection(s) Evaluate the Ideals and Principles of Founding Documents Read and research the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, or the Federalist Papers to find examples of basic principles of American political ideals. Use the following worksheet to record the examples you find. Then write a paragraph stating which principle you feel is most important. Basic Principles of American Political Ideals Write a paragraph stating your opinion about the principle that you feel is most important. 22

24 Identify the Expansion of Civil Rights and Liberties SS.912.C.2.9 Identify the expansion of civil rights and liberties by examining the principles contained in primary documents. Explanation The expansion of civil rights in the United States can be traced in part by reviewing how, over time, numerous amendments to the Constitution have expanded voting rights. Examples The following amendments to the Constitution have all expanded voting rights: 1868: 14th Amendment Granted the right to vote to all male inhabitants of any state who are at least 21 years old 1870: 15th Amendment Provided that the right to vote would not be denied or abridged on the basis of race, color or previous condition of servitude 1920: 19th Amendment Prohibited any United States citizen from being denied the right to vote on the basis of sex 1971: 26th Amendment Lowered the voting age from 21 to 18 Academic Vocabulary amendment a change or addition to a legal document civil rights the rights of citizens to political and social equality and freedom voting rights the exercise of the right to vote Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the texts listed below to the practice activity that appears on the following page. from My Bondage and my Freedom, by Frederick Douglass The Gettysburg Address, by Abraham Lincoln Letter to His Son, by Robert E. Lee Inaugural Address, by John F. Kennedy Letter from Birmingham City Jail, by Martin Luther King, Jr. Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to apply your knowledge of the standard. You may opt to complete the activity with knowledge you gained from reading the texts cited above. 23

25 Name Date Selection(s) Identify the Expansion of Civil Rights and Liberties Perform research about the Constitutional amendments that expanded voting rights (14 th, 15 th, 19 th, and 26 th ). Identify the group or groups of people whose civil rights were expanded by passage of each amendment. Then, use the following worksheet to record your information. Perform some research, and write a paragraph supporting or rejecting the following idea: The voting age in the United States should be lowered to 17. Constitutional Amendment Whose Civil Rights Were Expanded By Passage of the Amendment? Fourteenth Amendment Fifteenth Amendment Nineteenth Amendment Twenty-Sixth Amendment Write a paragraph supporting or rejecting the following idea: The voting age in the United States should be lowered to

26 Strategies for Dealing With Interpersonal Conflicts HE.912.B.4.3 Demonstrate strategies to prevent, manage, or resolve interpersonal conflicts without harming self or others. Explanation Interpersonal conflicts are an unavoidable part of life, but you are in control of how you handle them. Using strategies to prevent, manage, or resolve interpersonal conflicts decreases the chance of you or others being harmed by an out-of-control conflict. Strategies for dealing with conflict include: avoiding triggers, agreeing on the problem, staying calm and respectful, listening carefully, keeping people and problems separate, and discussing solutions with others. Examples Examples of effective and ineffective conflict management/resolution strategies: Effective Strategy: Ty is being bullied by another student. He avoids the bully as much as possible, but the bully continues to bother him. When the bully tries to engage him in a physical fight, Ty walks away and tells a school counselor about the problem. The counselor talks to the bully and gets him help, and the bully stops bothering Ty. Ineffective Strategy: Between classes, Marcel accidentally bumps into another student, knocking the books out of his hands. He mutters sorry and keeps walking. The student he bumped into shoves him into the lockers. This angers Marcel, and he shoves the student back. They start throwing punches before the fight is broken up. Both boys are injured and get suspended from school. Academic Vocabulary strategies planned series of actions prevent stop something from happening resolve find a solution to a problem interpersonal relating to relationships between people Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the following texts to the practice activity that appears on the following page. Araby, by James Joyce Shooting an Elephant, by George Orwell Next Term, We ll Mash You, Penelope Lively Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to help you apply the standard. You may opt to complete the practice worksheet as if you were a character from one of the texts cited above. 25

27 Name Date Selection(s) Strategies for Dealing With Interpersonal Conflicts Complete the worksheet below with examples of conflict you have observed in real life or have read about. Then, list the strategies used to handle the conflict. Finally, evaluate whether or not the strategy was effective and give an explanation. Description of Conflict: Strategies used to manage/resolve conflict: Were the strategies used to manage/resolve the conflict effective? Why or why not? Description of Conflict: Strategies used to manage/resolve conflict: Were the strategies used to manage/resolve the conflict effective? Why or why not? Description of Conflict: Strategies used to manage/resolve conflict: Were the strategies used to manage/resolve the conflict effective? Why or why not? 26

28 Analyze the Validity of Ways to Ask for and Offer Health Assistance HE.912.B.4.4 Analyze the validity of ways to ask for and offer assistance to enhance the health of self or others. Explanation A variety of different health issues and situations require assistance, whether it s for your own health or the health of someone else. There are different ways to ask for assistance to enhance your own health, but also many ways to offer assistance to someone who may need help with a health-related issue or situation. Examples Here are examples of situations in which students either asked for or offered healthrelated assistance. Asking for assistance: Dan has just found out he has a health condition that is going to require frequent doctor visits. He is nervous, but he decides to ask his best friend Aaron for help. Aaron s sister Lisa has the same condition, and he knows that Lisa is managing her health well. Dan asks Aaron and Lisa if they can help him write questions to take to his doctor. Offering assistance: Rina has noticed that her sister Anna seems very unhappy lately. Anna doesn t talk much, and goes into her room as soon as they get home. Rina tells Anna she knows something is wrong, and asks her how long she has felt this way. When Anna tells Rina that no one else has noticed or bothered to ask, Rina offers to listen. She also tells her sister that she d be happy to visit the school counselor with her. Academic Vocabulary analyze to examine carefully and in detail validity truthfulness; the ability of a test to measure correctly as intended enhance to increase or improve in value or quality Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the following texts to the practice activity that appears on the following page. The Tragedy of Macbeth, by William Shakespeare from In Memoriam, A. H. H., by Alfred, Lord Tennyson Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to help you apply the standard. As an option, you may want to write your responses as if you were a character from one of the texts cited above. 27

29 Name Date Selection(s) Analyze the Validity of Ways to Ask for and Offer Health Assistance Fill out the chart with examples. You may choose to use examples from real life, from texts you have read, or from your imagination. Situation (Real-life, Fictional, or Imagined) Ways to Ask For or Offer Assistance 28

30 Analyze the Impact of Citizen Participation SS.912.C.2.8 Analyze the impact of citizen participation as a means of achieving political and social change. Explanation Political and social change requires the active participation of citizens. The struggle for civil rights in the United States includes numerous examples of methods used by citizens to effect change. Examples Civil rights protesters in the United States in the 1950s and 1960s were guided by the principle of nonviolence in attempting to achieve political and social change. 1955: Montgomery bus boycott 1957: Little Rock High School integration 1960: Greensboro lunch counter sit-ins 1964: Freedom Summer (voter registration in Mississippi) 1966: Chicago Freedom Movement Academic Vocabulary civil rights the rights of citizens to political and social equality and freedom social change alteration in the social order of a society nonviolence the use of peaceful means, not force, to bring about political or social change Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the texts listed below to the practice activity that appears on the following page. The Bill of Rights, from the U.S. Constitution from Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka, by Chief Justice Earl Warren from Philadelphia, and Its Solitary Prison, by Charles Dickens Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to apply your knowledge of the standard. You may opt to complete the activity with knowledge you gained from reading the texts cited above. 29

31 Name Date Selection(s) Analyze the Impact of Citizen Participation Perform research to learn about a civil rights issue. Describe any political and social changes that resulted from citizen participation. Use the following worksheet to record your information. Then, write about a current civil rights issue for which you would like to see a greater level of citizen participation, resulting in political or social change. Civil Rights Issue You Chose: What political and social changes resulted from citizen participation in this civil rights issue? Write about a current civil rights issue for which you would like to see a greater level of citizen participation, resulting in political or social change. 30

32 How Governments Affect the Daily Lives of Citizens SS.912.C.3.13 Illustrate examples of how government affects the daily lives of citizens at the local, state, and national levels. Explanation Citizens and governments operate using budgets. People earn money at jobs; governments generate revenue through taxes and fees. Federal, state, and local governments all need to generate revenue in order to fund different expenditures. The federal government generates most of its revenue through the income tax. State and local governments use a combination of sales taxes, income taxes, and property taxes to raise money. The money raised by governments is spent on programs and projects that affect the daily lives of citizens at the local, state, and national levels. Examples The federal government s expenditures include national defense, health programs such as Medicare, and Social Security. State governments need money to support education, public utilities, and many other programs and projects. Local governments fund schools, police and fire protection, and community parks. Academic Vocabulary budget an estimate of income and expense for a certain amount of time expenditure an expense; the act or process of spending revenue the income of a government from taxes and other sources Literature Link You may want to consider relating what you learned from the texts listed below to the practice activity that appears on the following page. The Bill of Rights, from the U.S. Constitution from Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka, by Chief Justice Earl Warren from Philadelphia, and Its Solitary Prison, by Charles Dickens Apply the Standard Use the following worksheet to apply your knowledge of the standard. You may opt to complete the activity with knowledge you gained from reading the texts cited above. 31

33 Name Date Selection(s) How Governments Affect the Daily Lives of Citizens Research federal, state, and local government budgets, then create a list of expenditures that affect the daily lives of citizens at national, state, and local levels. Prioritize your list, ranking what you feel is the most important spending priority for the federal government, state government, and local government. Write a paragraph supporting your choice of priorities. Governments Expenditures That Affect the Daily Lives of Citizens (Ranked By Level of Importance) Federal Government State Government Local Government Write a paragraph in support of what you feel is the most important spending priority of the federal, state, or local government. 32

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