Unit 2 Assessment The Development of American Democracy

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1 Unit 2 Assessment 7

2 Unit 2 Assessment The Development of American Democracy 1. Which Enlightenment Era thinker stated that everyone is born equal and had certain natural rights of life, liberty, and property that could not be separated from them? a. Jean-Jacques Rousseau b. Baron de Montesquieu c. John Locke d. Thomas Hobbes 2. Montesquieu s theory of separation of power in a government helped our Founding Fathers guard against what fear? a. Fear of a warring government b. Fear of a weak government c. Fear of the citizens d. Fear of a tyrannical king We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. 3. What Enlightenment Era philosopher s writings most likely influenced the Founding Fathers ideas in this passage? a. Baron de Montesquieu b. John Locke c. Thomas Hobbs d. Thomas Paine Political liberty is to be found only in moderate governments; and even in these it is not always found. It is there only when there is no abuse of power. But constant experience shows us that every man invested with power is apt to abuse it, and to carry his authority as far as it will go. Is it not strange, though true, to say that virtue itself has need of limits? To prevent this abuse, it is necessary from the very nature of things that power should be a check to power. A government may be so constituted, as no man shall be compelled to do things to which the law does not oblige him, nor forced to abstain from things which the law permits. --Montesquieu The Spirit of Laws 8

3 4. Montesquieu s ideas in the passage above influenced the Founding Fathers creation of what guiding principal in our government? a. the principle of natural rights b. the principle of reserved powers c. the principle of freedom of speech d. the principle of limited power in government 5. How did the English Bill of Rights influence delegates during the Constitutional Convention? a. It was submitted as a model for the new constitution. b. It spelled out the proper role for the branches of government. c. It established a number of rights the delegates wished to guarantee in the new constitution. d. It was one of the first documents to limit the sovereign power of the monarch, parliament, and royal authorities. 6. What pamphlet denounced British rule and fanned the flames of revolution? a. Common Sense b. English Bill of Rights c. Magna Carta d. Mayflower Compact No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, or in any other way destroyed except by 2. the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land. -excerpt from the Magna Carta 7. How did this idea, expressed in the Magna Carta, influence the colonists views of government? a. The colonists believed in multiple branches of government. b. They believed the government should protect the citizens right to free speech. c. They believed that citizens should be able to petition their government for changes in laws. d. The colonists believed that all should obey the law and citizens had a right to trial by jury We whose names are underwritten, do solemnly and mutually covenant [agree to] and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic [government], for our better ordering and preservation and convenient for the general good of the colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience. -excerpt from the Mayflower Compact 8. The idea presented in this excerpt from the Mayflower Compact is an example of how the colonists put which of the following in practice? a. common law b. natural rights theory c. separation of power theory d. social contract theory 9

4 Every thing that is right or natural pleads for separation. The blood of the slain, the weeping voice of nature cries, TIS TIME TO PART. Even the distance at which the Almighty hath placed England and American, is a strong and natural proof, that the authority of the one, over the other, was never the design of Heaven. -Thomas Paine, Common Sense, Which of the following newspaper headlines would best support Thomas Paine s ideas of government in this excerpt of Common Sense? a. It is Natural for the Colonies to become Independent! b. Reconcile with Great Britain Now! c. The Tyranny of the King is Great! d. Join or Die. Use the information in the box to answer the question Events Leading to the American Revolution 1. The Declaration of Independence is issued. 2. British Parliament passes Tea Act. 3. Boston Tea Party staged to protest British policies. 4. First battles of the American Revolution are fought. 10. What is the correct sequence of events? a. 2, 1, 4, 3 b. 4, 2, 3, 1 c. 2, 3, 4, 1 d. 1, 2, 4, Which statement describes the movement for independence in the thirteen colonies? a. The independence movement began soon after the founding of the Plymouth Colony. b. Protests against British colonial policies gradually led to demands for independence. c. The King of England required the colonists to become economically self-sufficient. d. The movement for independence was equally strong in all of the colonies. 12. How did the laws passed by Parliament encourage American colonists to consider revolution against British rule? a. The Parliament raised taxes in the American colonies without granting the colonies any representation in Parliament. b. The Parliament ignored American representatives in Parliament on issues of taxes in the American colonies c. The Parliament revealed the British plan to expand the American colonies farther west on the continent. d. The Parliament represented an effort in Britain to end the slave trade in the colonies. 10

5 Use the diagram below to answer the following questions Parliament Passes the Tea Act. The colonists boycott, smuggle, and destroy the taxed British goods. Parliament passes the Intolerable acts.? 13. What goes in the next box in the diagram? a. The colonists dumped Tea in Boston Harbor. b. The colonists protested the repeal of the Tea Act with riots in London. c. The English merchants lost more money on slaves shipped to the Americas. d. The colonists began to consider themselves a group instead of individual colonies. 14. Why did the Colonists boycott, smuggle, and destroy the goods Parliament taxed? a. Parliament ignored American representatives on Parliament on issues of taxes levied in the American colonies. b. Parliament raised taxes in America without granting the colonies any representation in Parliament. c. The taxes revealed the British plan to expand the American colonies farther west on the continent d. The taxes represented an effort in Britain to end the slave trade in the colonies. 15. How did the British reaction to the Colonists protests change over time from the Stamp Act (1765) to the Intolerable Acts (1774)? a. The British allowed the colonists to determine their own rights. b. The British reacted less and less harshly to the colonists protests. c. The British reacted more and more harshly to the colonists protests. d. The British reacted harshly at first, then gave into the colonists protests as the years went on. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed -excerpt from the Declaration of Independence 16. According to this excerpt, how does the source of natural rights compare to the source of government power? a. Natural rights come from the government; government power comes from the people. b. Natural rights come from the government; government power comes from God. c. Natural rights come from God; government power comes from the people. d. Natural rights come from God; government power comes from God. 11

6 17. According to the Declaration of Independence, when do people have the right to alter or abolish a government? a. If that government is a limited monarchy. b. If that government violates their natural rights. c. If that government favors one religion over another. d. If that government becomes involved in entangling alliances. 18. Why has the Declaration of Independence (1776) had a major influence on peoples throughout the world? a. It guarantees universal suffrage. b. It establishes a basic set of laws for every nation. c. It describes the importance of a strong central government. d. It provides justification for revolting against unjust governments. We hold these truths to be self-evident: That all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness;... -excerpt from the Declaration of Independence 19. This quotation is evidence that some of the basic ideas in the Declaration of Independence were a. limitations of the principles underlying most European governments of the 1700 s. b. adaptations of the laws of Spanish colonial governments in North America. c. adoptions of rules used by the Holy Roman Empire. d. reflections of the philosophies of the European Enlightenment. 20. Which of the following statements describes a monarchy? a. It is the most common form of government in the world today. b. It is a government in which the power is shared by all citizens. c. It is a government in which one person usually inherits their power. d. It is a form of government that no longer exists in the world today. 21. Which of the following statements always describes a dictatorship? a. The power is usually inherited. b. The government is controlled by one person. c. The leaders are chosen in free elections. d. The congress must vote to enact laws. 22. Where did the idea of direct democracy come from? a. the Magna Carta b. ancient Greece c. Roman law d. John Locke 12

7 23. In an imaginary kingdom, the people were being mistreated by their king. The people of each town got together and chose chiefs to bring their complaints to the king. What type of government did the town s people demonstrate by their actions? a. autocracy b. direct democracy c. monarchy d. representative democracy 24. Which of the following is NOT an authoritarian system of government? a. oligarchy b. theocracy c. constitutional monarchy d. communism The House of Representatives shall be composed of members Chosen every second year by the People for the several states, and The electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature. 25. Based on the quotation above, which type of government is described? a. monarchy b. oligarchy c. direct democracy d. republic 26. In an authoritarian government, which of the following characteristics would you most likely see? a. free elections b. unitary system c. majority rule d. limited government 13

8 Assessment Answer Key: Question Answer DOK Standard 1 C 1 SS.7.C D 2 SS.7.C B 3 SS.7.C D 2 SS.7.C C 2 SS.7.C A 1 SS.7.C D 2 SS.7.C D 3 SS.7.C A 2 SS.7.C C 1 SS.7.C B 2 SS.7.C A 2 SS.7.C D 2 SS.7.C B 1 SS.7.C C 2 SS.7.C C 1 SS.7.C B 1 SS.7.C D 2 SS.7.C D 2 SS.7.C C 1 SS.7.C B 1 SS.7.C B 1 SS.7.C D 2 SS.7.C C 2 SS.7.C D 2 SS.7.C B 2 SS.7.C

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