American Government and Politics Curriculum. Newtown Public Schools Newtown, Connecticut

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "American Government and Politics Curriculum. Newtown Public Schools Newtown, Connecticut"

Transcription

1 Curriculum Newtown Public Schools Newtown, Connecticut Adopted by the Board of Education June 2009

2 NEWTOWN SUCCESS-ORIENTED SCHOOL MODEL Quality education is possible if we all agree on a common purpose as we work together to continuously improve the teaching and learning process. We believe that ALL CHILDREN CAN AND WILL LEARN WELL. The system strives to establish high standards for our students, faculty, and staff through the curriculum documents. Mastery of this curriculum depends on the effort and persistence of the learner, the support of the parents, and the knowledge, skills and persistence of the staff. In order for our students to reach the goals of cognitive achievement, students must learn how to use the process skills of decision-making, problem solving, and critical thinking. Students need to take responsibility for their learning by becoming self-directed, active participants in the educational process. We must continuously work to improve the learning environment and the curriculum. To improve, we must analyze what we believe, what we know, and what we want before we take action to reach these goals. It is the responsibility of the staff of the Newtown Public Schools to provide all children with the opportunity to learn well. We believe that the students and staff will be more productive when basic human needs are met. These needs include: Belonging, the need for positive relationships; Competence, the need to be successful; Freedom, the need to have control over decisions; Fun, the need to enjoy life; and Survival, the need for shelter, food and good health. Living and working with others enriches the experiences of students. Positive self-esteem brings productivity and personal satisfaction to students and to staff. This esteem can be nurtured through opportunities to self-evaluate constructively and see performance improve as a result of work.

3 Newtown High School Mission and Learning Expectations Newtown High School is committed to building a community that pursues rigorous academic goals and personal responsibility. We also encourage dignity, civility, and tolerance. At Newtown High School, students and teachers work together so that all members of the school community can reach the highest possible level of individual potential. In our partnership of students, teachers, parents, and community members, we work to promote success in a challenging environment and to cultivate competent, contributing, and productive citizens. Graduates of Newtown High School will: Academic Expectations Demonstrate strategies to identify, locate, and interpret information Relate and apply new knowledge using a variety of resources including technology Take and support a position on information and ideas Convey information and ideas in a given written format Use inquiry strategies and apply appropriate procedures to solve and communicate an authentic problem or situation Convey information and ideas to others in a presentation using spoken language, non-verbal language and multi-media Civic Expectations Develop opinions on a variety of issues Exhibit involvement in the classroom, school, and larger community through speech and action Social Expectations Value personal integrity, respect for others, and appreciation for diversity Share responsibility with others to address and resolve issues

4 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT & POLITICS FOCUS ON THE MISSION STATEMENT FOCUS GOALS: IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS DURING SENIOR YEAR STUDENTS WILL: Academic Expectations Demonstrate strategies to identify, locate, and interpret information Relate and apply new knowledge using a variety of resources including technology Take and support a position on information and ideas Convey information and ideas in a given written format Use inquiry strategies and apply appropriate procedures to solve and communicate an authentic problem or situation Convey information and ideas to others in a presentation using spoken language, non-verbal language and multi-media Civic Expectations Develop opinions on a variety of issues Exhibit involvement in the classroom, school, and larger community through speech and action Social Expectations Value personal integrity, respect for others, and appreciation for diversity Share responsibility with others to address and resolve issues OPPORTUNITIES TO MEET THE STANDARDS AS SCORED BY THE ANALYTICAL RUBRICS: In American Government students will be provided the opportunity to meet the Graduation Standards for Spoken and Written communication through a variety of assessments throughout the course.

5 Unit I: Citizenship Lens: Rights and responsibilities Strands: Political science and government Timeline: 1 Week American Government and Politics Generalizations: 1. Many people throughout the world want to participate in and gain citizenship to the United States. What freedoms are given to Americans? What are the requirements/process for gaining citizenship? What are the benefits to citizenship? How many people per year attempt to gain citizenship? Why do people risk their lives to live somewhere else? How have governments aided and/or hindered people s movements between nations? Topics: freedom, citizenship, and rights civil, human, and political 2. With freedom comes responsibility. What are the responsibilities of citizenship? Why do applicants for citizenship need to speak English and have knowledge of American government? Should people speak the language of the receiving country? Is freedom free? Topics: responsibility Provocative Questions: 1. Should all United States citizens and those who choose to come here learn English? 2. Is freedom really free? Skills: Students will be able to: Independently develop a position and support it with content based evidence, and Identify and evaluate different perspectives about citizenship. Suggested Learning Experiences: 1. After a whole class brainstorm about rights granted to citizens, students will break up into small groups and based on the assigned category given to their group they will identify the rights that fit into that group. Since many rights can be classified in many ways students will have to be able to justify their classification. 2. Students will complete a T-Chart that examines the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. 3. Using a discussion rubric to track student participation, students will respond to the question: Why do people from other countries go to such great lengths to come to America and become a citizen? What do they gain? What might they lose? 4. Students will either participate in discussion or write essays based on the following questions: Is voting a right or a responsibility? Should free-riders be taxed for not participating in the political process since they are a cost to the community? Explain the meaning behind the saying Democracy is not a spectator sport.

6 Suggested Assessments: Students will conduct an interview with an immigrant to the United States discussing his/her reasons for coming to this country and their ideas about the rights and responsibilities that come along with making the choice to come to America. This interview will be written up and graded based on the Written Communication Graduation Standard Rubric. Students will participate in a promoting civic education campaign. They will design a program to increase civic education in schools and boost the sense of civic responsibility.

7 Unit II: Foundations of Government Conceptual Lens: Origins Strands: History, economics, political science and government Timeline: 3-4 Weeks Generalizations: 1. Political, social, economic, and cultural differences determine the amount of freedom found in a society. What forms of government exist? What political, social, economic, and cultural factors affect freedom in a society? How do these factors affect the freedom people in the society have? Does the word democracy equate freedom and equality? Does the concept of democracy embrace individualism? If so, are all individuals equal and free in a democracy? Topics: democracy, freedom, government forms 2. A society s beliefs and principles guide developing governments. Why did America decide to break free from England? How did they go about deciding upon a new form of government? What are the five basic principles upon which the United States Constitution is based? How does the Constitution provide for limits on government? How do principles guide the creation of constitutions? Topics: popular sovereignty, limited government, separation of powers, checks and balances, federalism, and constitutions 3. Cooperation, compromise, and solid relations strengthen government in a federalist system. What responsibilities belong to the state government? The federal government? How does each promote cooperation among the states? How does the Constitution ensure the people s authority over government? How does federalism allow for political and economic diversity among states? Topics: extradition, full faith and credit clause, and privileges and immunities clause 4. Government systems reflect the purposes and ideals, laid down by the leaders, in constitutions and other political documents. What did the Founding Fathers believe governments should do? Which ideals did the Founding Fathers include in the Constitution? From where did those ideals come? How does the language of the Preamble reflect the idea of the social contract? How does democracy demand a social contract? Topics: social contract, political philosophers, historical political documents Provocative Questions: 1. Are any peoples truly free? 2. Would there have been revolutionary change if King George had given a little to the colonists?

8 Skills: Students will be able to: Identify and evaluate different perspectives/points of view; Read critically in order to recognize the difference between fact and opinion; Analyze primary sources to draw conclusions, and Use critical thinking skills to recognize bias, point of view and context of historical events. Suggested Learning Experiences: 1. Students will participate in a debate that addresses the resolved statement: Freedom within a nation is strongly affected equally by political, social, economic, and cultural influences. 2. Students will analyze primary and secondary sources to understand the philosophical influences on the Founding Fathers, and assess the importance of those influences as they are reflected in the Constitution. 3. Students will read critically a section of The American Political Tradition by Richard Hofstadter and discuss this question: If the Founding Fathers were alive today, what advice might they have for our government? Suggested Assessments: 1. Each student will be assigned a nation to investigate. They will research the political, social, economic and cultural make up of the nation and decide to what extent the nation s people are truly free. This will be graded based on their research through the Information Literacy Graduation Standard Rubric and it will be presented to class and graded through the Spoken Communication Graduation Standard Rubric.

9 Unit III: Political Beliefs and Behaviors Lens: Beliefs/values, interactions Strands: History, political science and government Timeline: 1 Week Generalizations: 1. Political parties ensure the two-party system of electoral politics. What is the 2-party system? What are the other systems that exist and work? How are political parties involved in electoral politics? How would life change without a two-party system? Topics: Party systems, Republicans, Democrats, minor parties, electoral politics/system 2. Minor parties, within the federal election process, can change elections dramatically. What roles do minor parties play in electoral politics? What are some of the minor parties and their issues that can affect the outcome of elections? How do minor parties and their issues impact elections? Topics: different current minor parties 3. The American electorate struggles to establish and maintain a political identity. What is ideological consensus? What are the ideologies behind the Democratic Party? The Republican Party? How does the electorate develop its political identity? How do political parties divide nations? What is the impact of that divide? Topics: ideology, psychological factors, sociological factors, and the electorate Provocative Questions: 1. Are governments responsive to the people? 2. Is the electorate qualified to make political choices about the leaders of the nation? Skills: Students will be able to: Identify and evaluate different perspectives/points of view; Detect bias in visual and/or print materials; Critique alternative interpretations of social studies issues and assess the credibility of different sources; Analyze primary sources to draw conclusions, and Draw and defend independent conclusions regarding current events based on analysis and research.

10 Suggested Learning Experiences: 1. Students will analyze Federalist # 10 and assess the founders intent for the creation of political parties. 2. Students will investigate a political party and assess its relevance to the people it serves. They will also examine the role of political parties in the electoral process. 3. Students will analyze the political spectrum and complete political ideological surveys to identify their preliminary political identification. Assessments: Based upon research and class discussion students will write a letter to discussing the political process. They can either write why they believe the electorate is or is not qualified to make political choices about the leaders of the United States, or whether or not they believe the government is responsive to the people and what changes they believe need to be made.

11 Unit IV: The Legislative Branch Conceptual Lens: Balance, Interactions Strands: History, political science and government Timeline: 4 Weeks Generalizations: 1. The system and the people are balanced by the history and organization of the government. By what authority do people gain office in Congress? How is Congress organized and led? Who can participate in Congress? In what ways does the organization of Congress bring it balance? How are the powers of Congress checked or limited by other branches? Topics: Constitution, Article I, Senate, House of Representatives, qualifications, term limits, membership, leadership, sessions, terms, committees, reapportionment, continuous body, bicameral 2. Governments are run effectively, efficiently and fairly when power is shared among the stakeholders. What is the scope of state government power in lawmaking? How do the federal and state governments share power? Topics: Make-up of state government, grants-in-aid 3. Many, varied outside forces strongly influence law-making bodies of government. By what authority are state and federal laws created? How are state and federal laws created? What influences and pressures are place on the lawmakers? How do federal grants influence state laws and policies? In what ways do lawmakers reconcile the outside forces in order to create necessary laws? Topics: Law-making, voting options, constituents, agencies, filibuster Provocative Questions: 1. Without the outside influences would lawmaking be fast and simple? 2. How is Congress a well-balanced law-making machine that runs the country? 3. In what ways does federalism make government effective, efficient, and fair? Skills: The students will be able to: Analyze primary sources to draw conclusions; Use the Internet to access and assess information; Assess the credibility of information, and use that information to present ideas in spoken and written formats, and Think critically about a current issue and speak to persuade an audience.

12 Suggested Learning Experiences: 1. Students will research current bills before Congress to investigate issues of interest to them. They will use the bills as models for their own bills when they begin Mock Congress. 2. Students will choose a topic of interest to them. They will research the topic, form an opinion about what their lawmakers should be doing about it, and they will write a letter to the appropriate lawmaker to request action on the topic. Assessments: 1. Students will participate in a Mock Congress. Through this activitiy students will research a topic of choice, write a bill, and prepare a speech to be given to Congress. This activity is an opportunity for students to meet Graduation Standards for Spoken Communication. If students discuss it with the teacher ahead of time they may also use this activity to meet Information Literacy and/or Written Communication. 2. Students will create a children s book in which they will explain, to the level of their choosing, the workings of congressional government in the United States. The book will be completed with words and illustrations that are appropriate to the level the student has chosen. American Government and Politics

13 Unit V: The Executive Branch Conceptual Lens: Power, perspectives Strands: History, political science and government Timeline: 4 Weeks Generalizations: 1. Strong constitutions can impact the roles, responsibilities and powers of a chief executive. Who is the chief executive of the state? The United States? What qualifications are listed in the constitutions as necessary to become Governor? President? How do the constitutions set up the roles and responsibilities of the Governor? President? What are the roles (constitutional and assumed) that the president plays? How does the Constitution impact the roles, responsibilities and powers of the President? Topics: Connecticut State Constitution, The Constitution of the United States of America, qualifications, roles, responsibilities 2. Leadership and the use of one s power impacts democracy. What powers does the President have? Who checks Presidential power? How does the President struggle for power with Congress? In what ways do political parties, the Executive Office of the President, and the Cabinet influence the President and impact democracy? Topics: Powers of the President, checks and balances, power struggle 3. The bureaucracy, iron triangles, civil service, independent agencies and commissions all influence the government and how it runs. What are Iron Triangles? What is the Civil Service? What is the bureaucracy? What are independent agencies and commissions? In what ways to these groups affect the running of the government? To what degree does the President have control over these groups? Topics: Outside influences on the Powers of the President 4. The process of nominating and electing a chief executive impacts the quality of the candidate selected. How do people become candidates for political office? How does the electoral process impact the quality of candidates? American Government and Politics

14 Topics: Electoral College, nomination, primaries, conventions, caucus, political parties 5. Power ebbs and flows depending on who holds it and the public perception of it. In what ways has power formally increased and/or changed since the Constitution was written? Why are changes in government necessary over time? How do people s perceptions of presidents change based on history? Provocative Questions: 1. Should the major political parties make a special effort to recruit and nominate a woman or minority candidate for executive office? 2. Can a woman run the United States of America? 3. Who controls the power of the Executive Office? Skills: The students will be able to: Independently develop a position and support it with content based evidence; Identify and evaluate different perspectives; Critique alternative interpretations of historical issues so as to weigh the credibility/reliability of different sources, and Analyze primary sources to draw conclusions. Suggested Learning Experiences: 1. Students will take on the persona of a Presidential/Gubernatorial candidate and apply for the job of Chief Executive through writing a resume and cover letter. Students must research their candidate fully and persuade the party to accept them as a candidate. They must take on the persona and sell themselves in a well-crafted resume and cover letter. Suggested Assessments: The students will research past presidents and their legacy. They will investigate how that President conducted himself in the job and how well the people received him. Students will evaluate the President in selected areas and issue the President a grade for his performance in the job. This will be graded based on the Information Literacy Graduation Standard rubric.

15 Unit VI: The Function and Workings of the Judicial Branch Conceptual Lens: Beliefs and values Strands: History, political science and government Timeline: 4 Weeks Generalizations: 1. The level and degree of a criminal or civil offense determines jurisdiction in the court system. What is a dual court system? How are criminal and civil offenses different? What is jurisdiction? Which courts have which jurisdiction? Topics: jurisdiction original, appellate, exclusive, and concurrent, dual court system, criminal law, civil law, Supreme Court 2. Federal judges should be free from political influences. Who are federal judges? What kind of political influence exists? Topics: judicial activism, judicial restraint, incorporation, and judicial review 3. Laws and government actions can be challenged and changed. How are government actions challenged? Who are the Supreme Court justices? 4. Supreme Court decisions impact American life. What historical decisions have impacted American life? In what ways have these decisions impacted American life? Topics: Historic court cases 5. The court system balances the rights of the individual with the rights of all. How do we identify individual rights? How does the court system operate to balance these rights? Are individual rights ever more important than the rights of the whole? Topics: Bill of Rights, individual rights 6. The court system demands due process if it is to establish justice. What is due process? How does due process fit into the court system? What is justice? Topics: due process, court system, justice 7. The Bill of Rights and the court system protect the liberties and freedoms of the people. What liberties and freedoms do the people have? In what ways do we see these liberties and freedoms protected? Why does the court interpret the Bill of Rights? Topics: judicial review, liberties and freedoms, Bill of Rights

16 Provocative Questions: 1. How would the impact of the Supreme Court decisions be different at different historical times? 2. How can Supreme Court Justices avoid allowing politics to influence their decisions? 3. Do all people deserve the rights they are given in the United States? Skills: Students will be able to: Identify and evaluate different perspectives/points of view; Critique alternative interpretations of history issues so as to weigh the credibility/reliability of different sources; Distinguish relevant from irrelevant information; Read critically in order to recognize the difference between fact and opinion; Analyzing primary sources to draw conclusion, and Draw and defend independent conclusions regarding historical events based on an analysis of different resources. Suggested Learning Experiences: 1. Students will conduct an in-depth review of historical, precedent-setting, Supreme Court cases and analyze the facts, the findings, and the reasons behind the judgments. Assess the impact of these cases on students today. Include this information in a discussion of Provocative Question #1. 2. A speaker from the Jury Outreach Program will be invited to discuss the court system and how it operates to establish justice. This presentation includes how jurors are selected for duty and the responsibilities of those who become jurors. 3. Students will identify and assess the rights which are protected by the First Amendment versus those that would not be protected and examine why in each case. 4. Students will conduct debates, whole class or mini-debates, on a range of controversial court cases and/or decisions. Suggested Assessments: Students will conduct and evaluate research about a historic court case. They will write the case up in brief format and present their case to their peers in small group discussions. Students will offer their opinions about why cases went as they did and what they thought of the ruling based on the evidence presented and their understanding of the Constitution.

A Correlation of. To the. Louisiana High School Civics Standards 2011

A Correlation of. To the. Louisiana High School Civics Standards 2011 A Correlation of 2016 To the Civics Standards 2011 Introduction This document demonstrates how Pearson American Government, 2016 meets the Civics Standards, 2011. Hailed as a stellar educational resource

More information

Credit-by-Exam Review US Government

Credit-by-Exam Review US Government Credit-by-Exam Review US Government Foundations and Ideas of the U.S. Government Characteristics and examples of limited government Characteristics and examples of unlimited government divine right unalienable

More information

Arkansas Social Studies Curriculum Framework United States Government

Arkansas Social Studies Curriculum Framework United States Government A Correlation of 2016 To the Introduction This document demonstrates how Pearson Magruder s meets the for,. Citations are to the Student Edition. Hailed as a stellar educational resource since 1917, Pearson

More information

Civics Grade 12 Content Summary Skill Summary Unit Assessments Unit Two Unit Six

Civics Grade 12 Content Summary Skill Summary Unit Assessments Unit Two Unit Six Civics Grade 12 Content Summary The one semester course, Civics, gives a structure for students to examine current issues and the position of the United States in these issues. Students are encouraged

More information

American Government: Teacher s Introduction and Guide for Classroom Integration

American Government: Teacher s Introduction and Guide for Classroom Integration American Government: Teacher s Introduction and Guide for Classroom Integration Contents of this Guide This guide contains much of the same information that can be found online in the Course Introduction

More information

3rd Nine Weeks. Student s Name: School: Core Teacher: Block: Gifted Resource Teacher:

3rd Nine Weeks. Student s Name: School: Core Teacher: Block: Gifted Resource Teacher: Suffolk Public School s Portfolio Packet 3rd Nine Weeks Student s Name: School: Accelerated Course: _7 th Civics Core Teacher: Block: Gifted Resource Teacher: This packet must be submitted at the conclusion

More information

American Government and Economics Curriculum Maps

American Government and Economics Curriculum Maps American Government and Economics Curriculum Maps Curriculum Map Study of Government and Constitution (25 Days) Civil Liberties and Rights (15 Days) Political and Electoral Process (20 Days) The Legislative

More information

Teach Civics and Economics to ALL Students book (teacher book).

Teach Civics and Economics to ALL Students book (teacher book). These sample pages are from the What I Need to Know to Successfully Teach Civics and Economics to ALL Students book (teacher book). This book contains the content in the student book, plus strategies and

More information

Social Studies Curriculum 12th Grade - American Government

Social Studies Curriculum 12th Grade - American Government Social Studies Curriculum 1th Grade - American Government Overarching Essential Question: What does it mean to be a knowledgeable, active participant in our American Democracy and how will I proceed as

More information

Geer/Schiller/Segal/Herrera, Gateways to Democracy, 3 rd Edition ISBN w/ MindTap PAC: ISBN text alone: ACGM

Geer/Schiller/Segal/Herrera, Gateways to Democracy, 3 rd Edition ISBN w/ MindTap PAC: ISBN text alone: ACGM ACGM Geer/Schiller/Segal/Herrera, Gateways to Democracy, 3 rd Edition ISBN w/ MindTap PAC: 9781285852904 ISBN text alone: 9781285858548 GOVT 2305 Federal Government LEARNING OUTCOMES Upon successful completion

More information

Popular Sovereignty Articles of Confederation Ratification Framers Virginia Plan. Government. Constitution

Popular Sovereignty Articles of Confederation Ratification Framers Virginia Plan. Government. Constitution Critical Content/Concept Web American Government: Origin and Structure Conceptual Lens: History Grade: 12 th - Government History Constitution Historical Documents Structure Founding Fathers Purposes Political

More information

AP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT UNIT 5: GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS FRQ s

AP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT UNIT 5: GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS FRQ s AP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT UNIT 5: GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS FRQ s CONGRESS 1. Article I of the Constitution discusses the powers of Congress. a. Define the EACH of the following powers: Expressed Implied Non-legislative

More information

Social Studies Curriculum Guide Ninth Grade AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

Social Studies Curriculum Guide Ninth Grade AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Social Studies Curriculum Guide Ninth Grade AMERICAN GOVERNMENT It is the policy of the Fulton County School System not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age,

More information

Three Branches of the American Government Packet

Three Branches of the American Government Packet Name: Three es of the American Government Packet THREE BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT Directions: Use the Civics in Action section in your book to complete the flow chart below by filling in the blanks with words

More information

The United States Constitution & The Illinois Constitution. Study Guide

The United States Constitution & The Illinois Constitution. Study Guide The United States Constitution & The Illinois Constitution Study Guide Test Date: Thursday, October 7, 2010 www.studystack.com/menu-279563 Separation of Powers: Checks & Balances Executive Legislative

More information

Social Studies Curriculum High School

Social Studies Curriculum High School Mission Statement: American Government The Social Studies Department of Alton High School is committed to the following; assisting students in mastering and appreciating the principles of government, preparing

More information

AP U.S. Government & Politics Exam Must Know Vocabulary

AP U.S. Government & Politics Exam Must Know Vocabulary AP U.S. Government & Politics Exam Must Know Vocabulary Amicus curiae brief: friend of the court brief filed by an interest group to influence a Supreme Court decision. Appellate jurisdiction: authority

More information

Florida Course Standards and Access Points for United States Government

Florida Course Standards and Access Points for United States Government A Correlation of Prentice Hall Magruder's American Government Florida Edition To the Florida Course Standards and Access Points for United States Government 2106310 CORRELATION FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

More information

Eighth Grade Social Studies Crosswalk North Carolina and the United States: Creation and Development of the State and Nation

Eighth Grade Social Studies Crosswalk North Carolina and the United States: Creation and Development of the State and Nation This document is designed to help North Carolina educators teach the Common Core and s (Standard Course of Study). NCDPI staff Eighth Grade Social Studies Crosswalk North Carolina and the United States:

More information

AP US Government Syllabus. Desired Results

AP US Government Syllabus. Desired Results AP US Government Syllabus Certificated Teacher: Date: 2017-2018 Course Title: AP United States Government Desired Results Credit: _X One Semester (0.5) Two Semesters (1.0) Estimate of hours per week engaged

More information

Review 10-1: The National Legislature

Review 10-1: The National Legislature Review 10-1: The National Legislature 1. What is the historical reason for Americans choosing a bicameral legislature? 2. What is a practical reason for Americans choosing a bicameral legislature? 3. What

More information

Grade 8. NC Civic Education Consortium 1 Visit our Database of K-12 Resources at

Grade 8. NC Civic Education Consortium 1 Visit our Database of K-12 Resources at Federalists v. Anti Federalists Overview In this lesson, students will explore the Articles of Confederation and the Articles influence in revising the Constitution of 1787. Students will experience the

More information

12 th Grade U.S. Government Curriculum Map FL Literacy Standards (See final pages)

12 th Grade U.S. Government Curriculum Map FL Literacy Standards (See final pages) 12 th Grade U.S. Government Curriculum Map FL Literacy Standards (See final pages) Grading Standard Description Unit/Chapter Pacing Chapter Vocab/Resources Period 1 SS 912.C13 SS 912.C4.1 SS912.C2.8 SS912.C2.7

More information

SAMPLE HIGHER ORDER QUESTIONS STUDENT SCALE QUESTIONS TEST ITEM SPECIFICATION NOTES. How did the benchmark help me. better understand?

SAMPLE HIGHER ORDER QUESTIONS STUDENT SCALE QUESTIONS TEST ITEM SPECIFICATION NOTES. How did the benchmark help me. better understand? CIVICS BENCHMARK CARD: SS.7.C.1.1 STANDARD: Demonstrate an understanding of the origins and purposes of government, law, and the American political system. BENCHMARK: SS.7.C.1.1 Recognize how Enlightenment

More information

Teacher s Guide. S.M.A.R.T.box. How a Bill Becomes a Law CURRICULUM MEDIA GROUP. Standards-based MediA Resource for Teachers

Teacher s Guide. S.M.A.R.T.box. How a Bill Becomes a Law CURRICULUM MEDIA GROUP. Standards-based MediA Resource for Teachers CURRICULUM MEDIA GROUP S.M.A.R.T.box Standards-based MediA Resource for Teachers TM How a Bill Becomes a Law Teacher s Guide 30821 A DIVISION OF FILMS MEDIA GROUP INTRODUCTION This Teacher s Guide provides

More information

12 th Grade American Government

12 th Grade American Government Standard 1: Demonstrate an understanding of the origins and purposes of government, law, and the American political system. Estimated # of Weeks: 2 weeks Pacing: August Measurement Topics Learning Targets

More information

Big Picture for Grade 12. Government

Big Picture for Grade 12. Government Big Picture for Grade 12 Government (1) History. The student understands how constitutional government, as developed in America and expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation,

More information

BGSU Firelands Dual Enrollment American Government Course Syllabus

BGSU Firelands Dual Enrollment American Government Course Syllabus BGSU Firelands Dual Enrollment American Government Course Syllabus Course Information BGSU Firelands Political Science 1100-American Government Credit:.50 / one semester of Huron High School Credit 3 semester

More information

The Legislative Branch C H A P T E R S 2 A N D 7 E S S E N T I A L S O F A M E R I C A N G O V E R N M E N T R O O T S A N D R E F O R M

The Legislative Branch C H A P T E R S 2 A N D 7 E S S E N T I A L S O F A M E R I C A N G O V E R N M E N T R O O T S A N D R E F O R M The Legislative Branch C H A P T E R S 2 A N D 7 E S S E N T I A L S O F A M E R I C A N G O V E R N M E N T R O O T S A N D R E F O R M M S. CAMPBELL A P GOVERNMENT EDGREN HIGH SCHOOL Imagine for a moment

More information

Federalists versus Anti-Federalists

Federalists versus Anti-Federalists Federalists versus Anti-Federalists Overview In this lesson, students will explore the Articles of Confederation and the revisions that created the Constitution of 1787. Students will analyze and assume

More information

Wallingford Public Schools - HIGH SCHOOL COURSE OUTLINE

Wallingford Public Schools - HIGH SCHOOL COURSE OUTLINE Wallingford Public Schools - HIGH SCHOOL COURSE OUTLINE Course Title: Civics Course Number: 3525 (B), 3524 (G), 3523 (A), 3522 (H) Department: Social Studies Grade(s): 10, 11 & 12 Level(s): Basic, General,

More information

Instructional Activities/Strategies Common Core Standards

Instructional Activities/Strategies Common Core Standards Topic/ Pacing Q 2 American Revolution 15 days NM Standards 8.3-C.1. describe political philosophies and concepts of government that became the foundation for the American revolution and the United States

More information

Government Semester Exam Review Sheet

Government Semester Exam Review Sheet Your Final Exam will come from these questions, with the addition of 6 from the Chapter 18 and 20 quizzes that you have yet to take. The answers are supplied on the last few pages. The exam will consist

More information

Grade Eight History and Social Science: Civics and Economics. Curriculum for Loudoun County Public Schools Ashburn, Virginia, 2016

Grade Eight History and Social Science: Civics and Economics. Curriculum for Loudoun County Public Schools Ashburn, Virginia, 2016 Grade Eight History and Social Science: Civics and Economics Curriculum for Loudoun County Public Schools Ashburn, Virginia, 2016 This curriculum document for Social Science is organized to help teachers

More information

AP Government and Politics Summer Assignment

AP Government and Politics Summer Assignment AP Government and Politics Summer Assignment To the AP Government student: For AP Government, you are required to complete the summer assignment prior to August 15, 2014 of the school year. The purpose

More information

20 th CENTURY UNITED STATES HISTORY CURRICULUM

20 th CENTURY UNITED STATES HISTORY CURRICULUM 20 th CENTURY UNITED STATES HISTORY CURRICULUM NEWTOWN SCHOOLS NEWTOWN, CT. August, 2002 K-12 SOCIAL STUDIES PHILOSOPHY The primary purpose of social studies education is to prepare young people to make

More information

From Articles to Amendments: A study of the U.S. Constitution

From Articles to Amendments: A study of the U.S. Constitution From Articles to Amendments: A study of the U.S. Constitution Use the weblinks provided to answer the following questions: The Preamble What six reasons did the founding fathers give as the purpose for

More information

Chapter 9 - The Constitution: A More Perfect Union

Chapter 9 - The Constitution: A More Perfect Union Chapter 9 - The Constitution: A More Perfect Union 9.1 - Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to convince

More information

Chapter 5: Congress: The Legislative Branch

Chapter 5: Congress: The Legislative Branch Chapter 5: Congress: The Legislative Branch Section 1: Congress Section 2: The Powers of Congress Section 3: The House of Representatives Section 4: The Senate Section 5: Congress at Work Congress Main

More information

Rabalais AP Government Review Vocabulary List

Rabalais AP Government Review Vocabulary List Rabalais AP Government Review Vocabulary List Chapter 2 The Constitution Democracy Government by the people, both directly or indirectly, with free and frequent elections. Direct democracy Government in

More information

FEDERALISM SS.7.C.3.4 Identify the relationship and division of powers between the federal government and state governments.

FEDERALISM SS.7.C.3.4 Identify the relationship and division of powers between the federal government and state governments. FEDERALISM SS.7.C.3.4 Identify the relationship and division of powers between the federal government and state governments. TABLE OF CONTENTS Lesson Summary... 2 Suggested Student Activity Sequence...

More information

CHAPTER 5: CONGRESS: THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

CHAPTER 5: CONGRESS: THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH CHAPTER 5: CONGRESS: THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH 1 Section 1: Congress Section 2: The Powers of Congress Section 3: The House of Representative Section 4: The Senate Section 5: Congress At Work SECTION 1: CONGRESS

More information

9.1 Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to

9.1 Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to 9.1 Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to convince their states to approve the document that they

More information

Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.4.C.2.2 Identify ways citizens work together to influence government and help solve community and state problems

Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.4.C.2.2 Identify ways citizens work together to influence government and help solve community and state problems Teacher s Name: Employee Number: School: Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.4.C.2.2 Identify ways citizens work together to 1. Title: HOW A Bill Becomes a Law - 4 th Grade 2. Overview - Big Ideas: Enduring

More information

Performance Objective Critical Attributes Benchmarks/Assessment

Performance Objective Critical Attributes Benchmarks/Assessment Curriculum Standard One: The students will explain the fundamental principles and moral values of American democracy as expressed in the U.S. Constitution and other essential documents of American democracy.

More information

NAME CLASS DATE. 1. What is the historical reason for Americans choosing a bicameral system?

NAME CLASS DATE. 1. What is the historical reason for Americans choosing a bicameral system? 10 Section 1 Guided Reading and Review The National Legislature The main points of Section 1 are supplied for you below in the form of questions. As you read the section, fill in the answers to the questions.

More information

Jumpstarters for the U.S. Constitution

Jumpstarters for the U.S. Constitution Jumpstarters for the U.S. Constitution Short Daily Warm-ups for the Classroom By CINDY BARDEN COPYRIGHT 2005 Mark Twain Media, Inc. ISBN 10-digit: 1-58037-304-6 13-digit: 978-1-58037-304-3 Printing No.

More information

Key Findings from National Voter Survey on Federal Funding for Public Television

Key Findings from National Voter Survey on Federal Funding for Public Television TO: FROM: Interested Parties Linda DiVall and Geoff Garin DATE: February 3, 2017 RE: AMERICAN VIEWPOINT Key Findings from National Voter Survey on Federal Funding for Public Television On behalf of public

More information

The Legislative Branch. Article I Congress

The Legislative Branch. Article I Congress The Legislative Branch Article I Congress Terms and Sessions of Congress A term is the length of time between elections in Congress (two years). Each Congressional term consists of two sessions, one during

More information

California Subject Examinations for Teachers

California Subject Examinations for Teachers CSET California Subject Examinations for Teachers TEST GUIDE SOCIAL SCIENCE SUBTEST III Subtest Description This document contains the Social Science subject matter requirements arranged according to the

More information

FORMAL QUALIFICATIONS FOR PRESIDENT TERM AND COMPENSATION

FORMAL QUALIFICATIONS FOR PRESIDENT TERM AND COMPENSATION American Government Chapter 13 Study Guide The Presidency I. Section 1: The President s Job Description 1. I will be able to identify the President s many roles. 2. I will be able to understand the formal

More information

United States & Virginia Government

United States & Virginia Government Roanoke County Public Schools United States & Virginia Government Curriculum Guide Summer 2009 i Revised 2009, 2011. Curriculum Guide Roanoke County Public Schools does not discriminate with regard to

More information

INSPIRED STANDARDS MATCH: LOUISIANA

INSPIRED STANDARDS MATCH: LOUISIANA www.inspiration.com LOUISIANA SOCIAL STUDIES CONTENT STANDARDS STATE STANDARDS FOR CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 05/22/97 TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION... 3 LOUISIANA CONTENT STANDARDS FOUNDATION SKILLS...

More information

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) 113.24. Social Studies, Grade 8. Category Student Expectation Strategy/Assessment (a) Introduction (1) In Grade 8, students study the history of the United States

More information

LESSON TITLE Social Studies Standards- by indicator ELA Standards- WTP Units 1-6

LESSON TITLE Social Studies Standards- by indicator ELA Standards- WTP Units 1-6 Correlation of We the People Series- Level Three to the South Carolina Social Studies Academic Standards [2011] and the South Carolina College- and Career-Ready Standards for English Language Arts, Grades

More information

Social Studies. Smyth County Schools Curriculum Map Subject:U.S. Government. Grade:12 th

Social Studies. Smyth County Schools Curriculum Map Subject:U.S. Government. Grade:12 th Standards Grade:12 th 1st Quarter Gov. 1 ( Skills) Gov. 2 (Political Philosophies) Gov. 3 (Concepts of Democracy) Gov. 4 (U.S. Constitution) Gov. 5 (Federalism) Gov. 6 (Elections) Gov. 7 (Powers of the

More information

American Government Unit 3 Rules were made to be broken or at least interpreted

American Government Unit 3 Rules were made to be broken or at least interpreted The following instructional plan is part of a GaDOE collection of Unit Frameworks, Performance Tasks, examples of Student Work, and Teacher Commentary for the American Government course. American Government

More information

The Constitution: A More Perfect Union

The Constitution: A More Perfect Union The Constitution: A More Perfect Union How has the Constitution created a more perfect Union? P R E V I E W Read the quotation and answer the questions that follow. If men were angels, no government would

More information

Magruder s American Government and Civics Tennessee Edition, 2014

Magruder s American Government and Civics Tennessee Edition, 2014 A Correlation of Tennessee Edition, To the Table of Contents Principles of United States Government... 3 Branches of Government... 7 The Supreme Court and the Constitution... 8 Federal Power... 11 Elections

More information

Congressional Elections

Congressional Elections Name: Government In America, Chapter 12 Big Idea Questions Guided Notes The Representatives and Senators The Members: in total - 100 Senators and 435 members of the House Requirements to be a member of

More information

Foundations of Government

Foundations of Government Class: Date: Foundations of Government Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. This is NOT a feature of all the states in today's

More information

Who's Running This Country? by John Nicholson

Who's Running This Country? by John Nicholson Teachers Notes (Primary) by Peter Legge Who's Running This Country? by John Nicholson These notes may be reproduced free of charge for use and study within schools but they may not be reproduced (either

More information

Congress: Balancing National Goals and Local Interests. Chapter 11

Congress: Balancing National Goals and Local Interests. Chapter 11 Congress: Balancing National Goals and Local Interests Chapter 11 Original intent Leading branch of government Parts of executive and judicial branches cannot exist without congressional approval Branch

More information

Chapter 6: Public Opinion and Political Action Topics Key Questions Key Terms. on American politics.

Chapter 6: Public Opinion and Political Action Topics Key Questions Key Terms. on American politics. Chapter 1: Introduction to Government Government Identify the key functions of government and explain why they matter. political participation Politics The Policymaking System Democracy in America Define

More information

The North Carolina Constitutional Convention of 1835 Overview Grade North Carolina Essential Standards Essential Questions Materials Duration

The North Carolina Constitutional Convention of 1835 Overview Grade North Carolina Essential Standards Essential Questions Materials Duration The North Carolina Constitutional Convention of 1835 Overview Students will explore the reasons North Carolina Constitution of 1776 needed reform, noting the changes to the NC Constitution that were made

More information

Pacing Guide & Curriculum Map. High School American Government

Pacing Guide & Curriculum Map. High School American Government Pacing Guide & Curriculum Map High School American Government Preface Teams of Lake County teachers created the curriculum maps in order to ensure that all students throughout the district receive a common

More information

COMPARISONS OF PARLIAMENTARY AND COORDINATED POWER (PRESIDENTIAL) SYSTEMS

COMPARISONS OF PARLIAMENTARY AND COORDINATED POWER (PRESIDENTIAL) SYSTEMS 1 Irmgard Hantsche March 2011 Conference on COMPARISONS OF PARLIAMENTARY AND COORDINATED POWER (PRESIDENTIAL) SYSTEMS at Bloomington, Indiana March 4 March 8, 2011 Final Remarks and Summary at the End

More information

Washington State K-12 Social Studies Learning Standards Version 1.2 January 2013

Washington State K-12 Social Studies Learning Standards Version 1.2 January 2013 Washington State K-12 Social Studies Learning Standards Version 1.2 January 2013 Washington State K-12 Social Studies Learning Standards Version 1.2 provides updates to Version 1, published in 2008. The

More information

UNIT 3 Rules were made to be broken or at least interpreted

UNIT 3 Rules were made to be broken or at least interpreted UNIT 3 Rules were made to be broken or at least interpreted Elaborated Unit Focus This unit is designed to help students understand how rules and laws are created in American Government. Rule of law is

More information

US Government Module 3 Study Guide

US Government Module 3 Study Guide US Government Module 3 Study Guide There are 3 branches of government. Module 3 will cover the legislative and execute and module 4 will cover the judicial. 3.01 The Legislative Branch aka Congress Established

More information

Unit 7 Our Current Government

Unit 7 Our Current Government Unit 7 Our Current Government Name Date Period Learning Targets (What I need to know): I can describe the Constitutional Convention and two compromises that took place there. I can describe the structure

More information

SOCIAL STUDIES KINDERGARTEN TO GRADE 12

SOCIAL STUDIES KINDERGARTEN TO GRADE 12 SOCIAL STUDIES KINDERGARTEN TO GRADE 12 PROGRAM RATIONALE AND PHILOSOPHY Social studies provides opportunities for students to develop the attitudes, skills and knowledge that will enable them to become

More information

The Articles of Confederation

The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation was the first government of the United States following the Declaration of Independence. A confederation is a state-centered, decentralized government

More information

Name: Date: Class Period: --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---- The Arizona State Civics Test This

More information

4 th Grade U.S. Government Study Guide

4 th Grade U.S. Government Study Guide 4 th Grade U.S. Government Study Guide Big Ideas: Imagine trying to make a new country from scratch. You ve just had a war with the only leaders you ve ever known, and now you have to step up and lead.

More information

SOCIAL STUDIES SEQUENCE

SOCIAL STUDIES SEQUENCE SOCIAL STUDIES SEQUENCE GRADE 7 SOCIAL STUDIES 7 FULL YEAR DAILY REQUIRED GRADE 8 SOCIAL STUDIES 8 FULL YEAR DAILY REQUIRED GRADE 9 GLOBAL STUDIES FULL YEAR DAILY REQUIRED GRADE 10 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY

More information

Constitutional Foundations

Constitutional Foundations CHAPTER 2 Constitutional Foundations CHAPTER OUTLINE I. The Setting for Constitutional Change II. The Framers III. The Roots of the Constitution A. The British Constitutional Heritage B. The Colonial Heritage

More information

POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLI)

POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLI) POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLI) This is a list of the Political Science (POLI) courses available at KPU. For information about transfer of credit amongst institutions in B.C. and to see how individual courses

More information

Williamsville C.U.S.D. #15 Social Studies Curriculum

Williamsville C.U.S.D. #15 Social Studies Curriculum SOCIAL STUDIES CURRICULUM SIXTH GRADE CIVICS 1 Williamsville C.U.S.D. #15 Social Studies Curriculum Program Title: Program Description: Program Content: Sixth Grade Civics Sixth Grade Civics is designed

More information

Magruder s American Government

Magruder s American Government Presentation Pro Magruder s American Government C H A P T E R 10 Congress 2001 by Prentice Hall, Inc. C H A P T E R 10 Congress SECTION 1 The National Legislature SECTION 2 The House of Representatives

More information

eorgia Adult Education CIVICS STANDARDS

eorgia Adult Education CIVICS STANDARDS eorgia Adult Education CIVICS STANDARDS CIVICS STANDARDS A. Demonstrate knowledge of key events, momentous documents, and historic people in United States history. B. Demonstrate knowledge of the structure,

More information

Unit: The Legislative Branch

Unit: The Legislative Branch - two houses. Name: Date: Period: Unit: The Legislative Branch Part One: How Congress is Organized Gerrymandering- to a state into an odd-shaped district for reasons. - people in a representative s district.

More information

having an effect or impact on the actions, behavior, opinions, etc., of another or others

having an effect or impact on the actions, behavior, opinions, etc., of another or others SS.7.C.1.1 Recognize how Enlightenment ideas including Montesquieu s view of separation of powers and John Locke s theories related to natural law and how Locke s social contract influenced the founding

More information

Part I: The Federalist Papers

Part I: The Federalist Papers Wheaton High School AP United States Government and Politics Summer Assignment The AP U.S. Government & Politics Summer Assignment has been designed to give students: 1. A head start on the required course

More information

4) Once every decade, the Constitution requires that the population be counted. This is called the 4)

4) Once every decade, the Constitution requires that the population be counted. This is called the 4) MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) The Founders intended that the House of Representatives be 1) A) professional. B) electorally insulated.

More information

CIVICS Participating in Government. Chapter Outlines CHAPTER 1

CIVICS Participating in Government. Chapter Outlines CHAPTER 1 CIVICS Participating in Government Chapter Outlines CHAPTER 1 Section 1: Who Americans Are Although American population patterns such as location, age, and occupation are changing, America remains a nation

More information

Prentice Hall Magruder s American Government 2006 and Oklahoma State and Local Government Workbook 2006

Prentice Hall Magruder s American Government 2006 and Oklahoma State and Local Government Workbook 2006 Prentice Hall Magruder s American Government 2006 and Oklahoma State and Local Government Workbook 2006 Grades 9-12 C O R R E L A T E D T O for Grades 9-12 UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT High School Standard

More information

5th Grade Social Studies. A New Nation

5th Grade Social Studies. A New Nation 5th Grade Social Studies A New Nation 7/10/2014 5 th Grade Social Studies Curriculum Effective Instruction Promotes Reading a variety of primary and secondary sources so that it is possible to Determine

More information

FORMING A NEW GOVERNMENT

FORMING A NEW GOVERNMENT FORMING A NEW GOVERNMENT These questions are in random order. They will be in a different order in class tomorrow. Seven Principles Checks & Balances Federalism Individual Rights Limited Government Popular

More information

For a Universal Declaration of Democracy

For a Universal Declaration of Democracy For a Universal Declaration of Democracy ERUDITIO, Volume I, Issue 3, September 2013, 01-10 Abstract For a Universal Declaration of Democracy Chairman, Foundation for a Culture of Peace Fellow, World Academy

More information

Terms of Congress is 2 years 1 st term March 1789, ended 1791

Terms of Congress is 2 years 1 st term March 1789, ended 1791 Chapter 10 Congress Section 1: National Legislature Bicameral congress 1. Historical Great Britain had one, most colonies as well 2. Practical compromise between big state and small state issue 3. Theoretical

More information

For a Universal Declaration of Democracy. A. Rationale

For a Universal Declaration of Democracy. A. Rationale Rev. FFFF/ EN For a Universal Declaration of Democracy A. Rationale I. Democracy disregarded 1. The Charter of the UN, which was adopted on behalf of the «Peoples of the United Nations», reaffirms the

More information

Unit Six: West African Nations in the 21 st Century Global Marketplace

Unit Six: West African Nations in the 21 st Century Global Marketplace Unit Six: West African Nations in the 21 st Century Global Marketplace Grade Level: Grades 6-12 National History Standards: Era 9: Standard 2A The student understands how population explosion and environmental

More information

Watch the video and take the pre-test for Be sure you are working on getting your collaboration and service learning project completed.

Watch the video and take the pre-test for Be sure you are working on getting your collaboration and service learning project completed. Module 3 Note Taking Guide Module 3 Policy and Elections Module 3 Lessons 3.00 Introduction Watch the video and take the pre-test for 3.00. Be sure you are working on getting your collaboration and service

More information

Constitutional Principles (4).notebook. October 08, 2014

Constitutional Principles (4).notebook. October 08, 2014 Bell Ringers Mrs. Salasney Homework Objective: Students will describe the conflicts facing the governing of the new nation 2 Which action by the British government was considered by American colonists

More information

Voting. Introduction: Guiding Questions: Learning Objectives: In the course of the lesson, students will. Curriculum Standards:

Voting. Introduction: Guiding Questions: Learning Objectives: In the course of the lesson, students will. Curriculum Standards: Voting Author: Rebecca Marino, Arnold Memorial School Grade Level: K-2 nd grade Dated Created: May 2016 For additional lesson plans, visit sos.tn.gov/civics/lessonplans. Introduction: This is the third

More information

Constitutional Underpinnings of the U.S. Government

Constitutional Underpinnings of the U.S. Government U.S. Government What is the constitutional basis of separation of powers? It can be found in several principles, such as the separation of government into three branches, the conception that each branch

More information

HPISD CURRICULUM (SOCIAL STUDIES, GOVERNMENT) EST. NUMBER OF DAYS:35 DAYS

HPISD CURRICULUM (SOCIAL STUDIES, GOVERNMENT) EST. NUMBER OF DAYS:35 DAYS HPISD CURRICULUM (SOCIAL STUDIES, GOVERNMENT) EST. NUMBER OF DAYS:35 DAYS UNIT NAME Unit Overview UNIT 3: POLICY-MAKING INSTITUTIONS A: CONGRESS B: POWERS OF CONGRESS C: CONGRESS IN ACTION D: THE PRESIDENCY

More information

American Government CP Curriculum Pacing Guide

American Government CP Curriculum Pacing Guide Unit 1 Principals of American Government Unit 2 The Legislative Branch Pacing 7 days 7 days USG-1.1 USG-1.2 USG-1.3 USG-1.5 USG-1.6 USG-2.1 USG-2.2 Analyze political theories related to the existence,

More information

THE ALMOST PAINLESS GUIDE TO THE U.S. CONSTITUTION #3401 Grades 5-Up Running Time: 20 minutes GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE PROGRAM

THE ALMOST PAINLESS GUIDE TO THE U.S. CONSTITUTION #3401 Grades 5-Up Running Time: 20 minutes GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE PROGRAM THE ALMOST PAINLESS GUIDE TO THE U.S. CONSTITUTION #3401 The Almost Painless Guide to the U.S. Constitution uses contemporary video footage, archival video footage and photographs, original graphics, and

More information