Oct 2012 Oct 2013 IMPROVING HUMAN SECURITY IN THE BATEYES OF THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. FIRST YEAR PROGRES REPORT

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1 Oct 2012 Oct 2013 IMPROVING HUMAN SECURITY IN THE BATEYES OF THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. FIRST YEAR PROGRES REPORT

2 Contents 1. BASIC DATA EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PURPOSE of the project RESULTS MAIN ACTIVITIES UNDERTAKEN Activities prior implementation Activities carried out to achieve the proposed results Progress towards the achievement of the outputs Achievements as measured against stated objectives Implementation constraints, including plans for addressing them Lessons learned and Good Practices Impact of key partnerships and inter-agency collaboration FORTHCOMING ANNUAL WOK-PLAN (attached) RESOURCES AND FINANCIAL IMPLEMENTATION PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES IMPROVING HUMAN SECURITY IN BATEYES - FIRST YEAR PROGRES REPORT OCT OCT

3 1. BASIC DATA Date of submission October 31th, 2013 Benefiting country and location of the project Title of the project Dominican Republic, bateyes of San Pedro de Macorís, Barahona, Bahoruco and Independencia. Improving human security in the bateyes of the Dominican Republic by securing documentation and ensuring that vulnerable people s needs are met (HCR-SA ). Duration of the project October 1 st, 2012 September 30 th, 2015 UN organization responsible for management of the project UN executing partners Non-UN executing partners United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNCHR) United Nations Development Program (UNDP) United Nations Children s Fund (UNICEF) Asociación Scalabriniana al Servicio de la Movilidad Humana (ASCALA) Cáritas Diocesana Centro de Investigación y Acción Cultural (CIAC) Instituto Dominicano de Desarrollo Integral (IDDI) Mujeres en Desarrollo (MUDE) Pastoral Materno Infantil (PMI) World Vision (WV) Total project cost USD 2,499, UNCHR: US$ 662, PNUD: US$ 1,011, UNICEF: US$ 662, Reporting period October 1st October 31th Type of report First report, year 1. List of abbreviations and acronyms ASCALA, Asociacion Scalabriniana al Servicio de la Movilidad Humana CD, Cáritas Diocesana CIAC, Centro de Investigación y Acción Cultural IDDI, Instituto Dominicano de Desarrollo Integral ITC, Inter-agency Technical Committee MEPyD, Ministerio de Planificación y Desarrollo MUDE, Mujeres en Desarrollo. PMI, Pastoral Materno Infantil South region, provinces of Barahona, Bahoruco and Independencia. UNCHR, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. UNDP, United Nations Development Program UNICEF, United Nations Children s Fund UNRCO, United Nations Resident Coordinator s Office WV, World Vision 2

4 2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The project Improving human security in the bateyes of the Dominican Republic by securing documentation and ensuring that vulnerable people s needs are met was expected to start in October 2012; however, the project did not start until February 2013 when a project coordinator was hired. The activities developed prior to the implementation were the identification of local partners and signing agreements, introduction of the project to local authorities, logical framework revision, and design of the baseline of the project. In July 2013, ten agreements were signed among three UN agencies and seven executing partners. During the first year, progress towards the achievement of intended outputs have been focused to continue documentation campaigns and legal assistance to engage local authorities in the protection of bateyes population. The program has created various opportunities for the population through the identification of training needs and access to micro-loans, support and creation of community food stores, social mobilization to form a food security network, creation of literacy groups and after-school programs, identification and training of volunteers to form community networks for maternal health and sexual and reproductive health, mapping information in water, sanitation and energies facilities, as well as risk management capacities. From the standpoint of the inter-agency collaboration and partnership, a major impact of this project has been to join forces and integrate interventions to cooperate in the protection and welfare of the populations whose human security is most threatened, particularly after the recent decision of the Dominican Constitutional Court which can result in increasing the risk of creating statelessness for an estimated 200,000 people born in Dominican territory of Haitian origin PURPOSE OF THE PROJECT The project Improving human security in the bateyes of the Dominican Republic by securing documentation and ensuring that vulnerable people s needs are met will improve the human security situation of residents in 37 bateyes located in four provinces of the Dominican Republic (32 in San Pedro de Maoris, 3 in Barahona, 3 in Bahoruco, and 1 in Independencia) by providing civil status documentation, economic empowerment opportunities, and increasing access to basic services including health, education and legal services. UNHCR, UNDP, and UNICEF will conduct this jointly through a community centered, rights-based, multi-sectoral approach, and coordinated interventions. During a three years period (1 October September 2015) the project will focus in the following objectives: Objective 1. Ensure that Haitians, Dominicans of Haitian descent, and Dominicans living in the bateyes are protected from threats to personal and political security. Objective 2. Improve economic security by promoting the bateyes population s income generation capacity. 1 UN News Centre. UN urges Dominican Republic to ensure citizens of Haitian origin do not lose nationality. 3

5 Objective 3. Decrease the high levels of food insecurity experienced by Haitians, Dominicans of Haitian descent and Dominicans living in the bateyes. Objective 4. Advance health security for Haitians, Dominicans of Haitian descent and Dominicans living in the bateyes through increasing access to basic primary care and health education. Objective 5. Increase environmental security for Haitians, Dominicans of Haitian descent and Dominicans living in the bateyes such that they are better prepared for natural disasters, have access to clean water renewable energy. The main outputs to accomplish these objectives are: 1. Provide legal documentation to 2,000 people, Haitian migrant workers and their descendants and Dominicans. 1,000 of them are women. 2. Reduce discrimination and improving cooperation between bateyes and surrounding communities, benefiting 6,000 people and 60 radio professionals. 3. Creation of community tools for income generation. 4. Provide educational opportunities for 1,800 people. 5. Increase access to food through existing community structures that benefit 4,000 people. 6. Reduction of teenage pregnancy and HIV transmission through the training of 250 educators / this will benefit 3,000 adolescents. 7. Reduce children malnutrition for 6,000 infants. 8. Improve capacities to reduce disaster risks through the design and implementation of risk reduction plans. 9. Development of water and sanitation infrastructure. 10. Increasing access to renewable energy. With these interventions, the project will directly benefit 33,000 people and indirectly 60,000 people. From those direct beneficiaries, 15,000 are children and 1,500 senior citizens. The implementation of this project will be carried out through the following local partners with whom the UN agencies have signed agreements: Asociacion Scalabriniana al Servicio de la Movilidad Humana (ASCALA), Caritas Diocesana, Centro de Investigacion y Accion Cultural (CIAC), Instituto Dominicano de Desarrollo Integral (IDDI), Mujeres den Desarrollo (MUDE), Pastoral Materno Infantil, and World Vision. Also, the project will work closely with corresponding local authorities in each subject, the private sector, and academia. 4. RESULTS 4.1. MAIN ACTIVITIES UNDERTAKEN Activities prior to project implementation A. Hiring of the project coordination team. A coordinator and an administrative assistant were hired between February and March 2013 to provide support to the interagency coordination. This recruitment process was conducted through a competitive process, according to UNDP hiring procedures, which was undertaken by an evaluation committee comprised for staff from UNHCR, UNDP, UNICEF, and the UN Resident Coordinator s Office (UNRCO). 4

6 B. Identification of local partners and signing agreements for implementation. The process to identify implementing partners was conducted through meetings with NGOs and visits to the target communities. The criteria for the selection of these partners were to have previous successful working experience of these NGOs in the bateyes. To ensure coherence in the project implementation and to maximize resources, a limited number of partners were selected to implement different components of the project. In July 2013, seven agreements were signed among partners and the three UN agencies. C. Workshop to revise the logical framework of the project. A participatory workshop was organized in August 2013 in order to validate the consistency and objectivity of the indicators of the project. Several suggestions were made as a result of this review to better reflect the reality of the context and to adjust to the available resources (view in bullet ). D. Updated list of bateyes. The original proposal of the project had 37 communities of San Pedro de Macoris, Barahona, Bahoruco, and Independencia. However, it was considered important to update the list of the bateyes based on the vulnerability criteria of the communities. In order to ensure inter-sectorial interventions, 18 communities were proposed as priorities to work in the first year of the project. E. Development of the project baseline. After reviewing the logical framework of the project and updating the list of target communities, the project baseline was established. This process was carried out by hiring a consultant to coordinate with agencies and local partners the research methodology and data collection. A household questionnaire was applied to 342 families of 17 communities and six focas groups interviews were conducted in the target communities. The questionnaire was divided in different modules which addressed the different dimensions of human security, such as political security, economic, health and environmental safety. The results of the baseline will be available in November 2013, and will serve as a benchmark for monitoring the project's progress and achievements. F. Coordination meetings for inter-sectorial actions. The coordination took place at two levels. The first one was among UN agencies. An Inter-agency Technical Committee (ITC) was established which was composed of focal points from UNHCR, UNICEF, UNDP, and the project coordination team. The ITC met 17 times during the first year on a monthly basis or when circumstances required it. Also, at this level, three inter-agency meetings took place to report to the Representatives of UNCHR, UNICEF, UNDP, and UNRCO on project progress. The second level of coordination has been with local partners. Several meetings among partners, as well as a coordination workshop, were developed to share strategies and identify synergies among components. G. Introduction of the project to the local authorities. The project was introduced at the national level to the Ministry of Planning and Development (MEPyD). This ministry coordinates the bilateral cooperation between international agencies and the Dominican government. Representatives of UNHCR, UNICEF, UNDP, and UNRCO participated in this meeting. The project was also formally introduced to the local authorities of San Pedro de Macoris, Barahona, Bahoruco, and Independencia. A collaboration agreement was signed among the government and the municipalities during these events. Additionally, the agencies and local partners introduced the project to the sectorial authorities (Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education, Haitian Consulate, etc.) at the regional and local level. 5

7 Figure 1. Representatives of UNRCO, UNICEF, UNDP and UNHCR with local authorities in the public launch of the project in San Pedro de Maoris Activities carried out to achieve the proposed results. Output 1.1. Provide birth registry documents, national identification documents to both, Haitians and vulnerable Dominicans, passports and residencies to vulnerable Haitians. Six documentation campaigns trough the Haitian consulate in San Pedro de Macoris. Legal assistance to provide documentation to both Haitians and Dominicans descendants of Haitian migrants in San Pedro de Macoris. (1330 people). Informational meetings and psychosocial support for 50 Dominicans groups of Dominicans descendants of Haitians affected by the resolution 012/2007 in San Pedro de Macoris. 18 training workshops on human rights and access to documentation for community leaders in San Pedro de Macoris. Six meetings in Barahona with 282 people to socialize and analyze resolution and TC/0168/13 Decision of the Constitutional Court. A meeting with the Consul of Haiti in Barahona to organize three documentation campaigns in November-December Output 1.2 Built a sense of community security by decreasing discrimination, improving cooperation between the bateyes and the surrounding communities and creating opportunities for interaction. 6,000 estimated beneficiaries including 60 trained radio professionals. Signature of two cooperation agreements between the three UN agencies implementing the project and local authorities of San Pedro de Macoris, Barahona, Bahoruco, and Independencia. Signature of an agreement with the Central East University (prestigious academic institution in San Pedro de Macoris) to promote local dialogue on human security in the bateyes. First meeting of the Roundtable on Human Security in Bateyes (involving 30 people). Two radio production workshops targeting youths of San Pedro de Macoris and Barahona. (35 youths). Training of 32 youth in urban lyric and poetry skills for the promotion of their rights. 6

8 A popular urban poetry contest for tolerance and coexistence targeting youths of the villages of San Pedro de Macoris. (10 people participated and 200 audiences assisted). Output 2.1. Created, in partnership with community members, sustainable income generation mechanisms in 37 bateyes. 13 meetings with community leaders of San Pedro de Maoris and south region to introduce the objectives and goals of the project. Four workshops to create and strengthen community networks. Two workshops on leadership and gender equality. Diagnosis of occupational training needs of the community. Diagnosis of entrepreneurship in the bateyes. Meetings to promote culture of micro-credit in bateyes. A micro-credit workshop in the south with representatives of four bateyes. 47 micro loans to members of the community. Output 2.2: Provided educational opportunities for 1800 individuals. Introduction of the project to the school districts of the area. Coordination meetings with school principals about the objectives of the project. Selection and training of 35 facilitators and tutors (23 in San Pedro de Macoris and 12 in the south region) for the literacy and after school programs. Identification of adolescents at risk/ illiterate and children with school support needs. Rehabilitation of community spaces and Figure 2. Workshop-organic fertilizer production-sept schools and provision of educational tools and materials. Launch of 10 literacy groups and 20 after school programs. Educational monitoring of the beneficiaries. Figure 3. Children in the bateyes of San Pedro. Output 3.1: Built upon existing community social infrastructure to increase self sustaining access to food in the bateyes for at least 800 individuals and their families (4,000 direct beneficiaries) and their community (indirect beneficiaries). Survey to 128 families and 45 leaders of the community to identify the preference of the type of garden to be implemented (family or community). Strengthening of six community food stores in the bateyes. 7

9 Creation of two community food stores, accommodation of space and equipment. Maintenance of the food warehouse. Maintenance of the truck for delivery of goods. Merchandise purchase for distribution in the bateyes. Implementation of a community trading system. Soil evaluation and analysis of the villages to determine the feasibility of the type of garden. Identification of families and community land for the implementation of the gardens. Meetings for the creation of food safety nets in the communities. Figure 4. Workshop on organic fertilizer production Sep Output 4.1: Provided secure access to maternity and pre/post natal health care for 2,000 vulnerable women, whom it is calculated will each have at least 3 children, therefore an estimated 6,000 children will directly benefit from health care. Identification and training of 102 community volunteers for the creation of the maternal and child health network. Five workshops on prenatal care and breastfeeding, safe delivery, postpartum care, home visits, and monitoring tools. Output 4.2:Reduced of adolescent pregnancy and HIV transmission through the training of 250 peer educators who will provide face to face training to at least 12 adolescents each, benefiting a total of 3,000 adolescents Identification of 152 adolescent from 20 communities of San Pedro de Macoris to participate in the prevention of HIV and adolescent pregnancy network. 12 workshops on adolescent pregnancy and HIV prevention. Meetings to strengthen coordination among local and national authorities (Ministries of Health and Education) to strengthen the project s impact on the selected Bateyes. Assessment of the services provided by Adolescents Integrated Health Units and family planning programs in the community health centers of the target communities. 8

10 Output 4.3: Improved nutrition for at least 6,000 children. Figure 5. Capacity training on health care and HIV prevention. postpartum home visits, and monitoring tools. Identification and training of 102 community volunteers for the creation of the maternal and child health network. Five workshops on prenatal care and breastfeeding, Output 5.1: Improved Disaster Management Skills through the design and implementation of community risk plans and first response management. Identification of the main threats, vulnerabilities, risks and capacities in 9 bateyes of the south. Identification of community-based organizations for the formation of the risk management committees. Output 5.2: Developed WATSAN infrastructure. Identification of water and sanitation needs in 29 bateyes of San Pedro de Macoris. 102 community volunteers trained on community hygiene promotion. Output 5.3.: Increased the use of renewable energy. Identification of electricity needs in 9 communities of the southern region. 9

11 Progress towards the achievement of the outputs Outputs Objectively verifiable indicators Progress Recommendations/Comments 1.1.: Provided birth registry documents, national identification documents to both, Haitians and vulnerable Dominicans, passports and residencies to vulnerable Haitians. 2,000 persons (50% will be women) with civil registration and valid identification documentation by persons (300 women) living in the bateyes of San Pedro de Macoris with civil registration and valid identification documentation (404 Haitian birth certificates, 130 Haitian passports, 169 Dominican birth certificates and 24 Dominican IDs). Social mobilization in the south region and partnership with Haitian Consulate in Barahona. When the project began in San Pedro de Macoris, ASCALA/UNHCR had previous experience providing documentation and legal advice. However, in the southern region this work just started. It involves social mobilization, training, and developing partnerships with the consulate authorities of Haiti. In October 2013, the Dominican Constitutional Court made a decision that denied Dominican nationality to descendants of irregular Haitian migrants since This presents a serious risk of making statelessness for an estimated 200,000 people born in Dominican territory of Haitian origin. This situation forces a review of current strategies for the provision of documentation. 1.2: Built a sense of community security by decreasing discrimination, improving cooperation between the bateyes and the surrounding communities and creating opportunities for interaction. 6,000 estimated beneficiaries including 60 trained radio professionals. 6,000 estimated beneficiaries including 60 trained radio. Two cooperation agreements have been signed with local authorities in the four provinces. A roundtable meeting on human security was organized in San Pedro de Macoris with 30 people (private sector, civil society and UN system). 18 (7 women) youth of the villages of San Pedro de Macoris and 17 in Barahona (8 women) were The desicion by the Dominican Constitutional Court requires a review of the advocacy strategies (at national and local level) to support Dominicans of Haitian descendent who can be with high risk of becoming stateless. During the launch of the project in the south region and the signing of an agreement with local authorities the need to increase the number of target communities (actually 6) was emphasized. The south region is one of the most impoverished In the country with a great number of migrant populations. The local authorities are committed to support the project. 10

12 trained in radio communication. 2.1.: Created, in partnership with community members, sustainable income generation mechanisms in 37 bateyes. Number of microentrepreneursh ip created in the 37 bateyes per year. 47 entrepreneurial projects in the batey (100% female entrepreneurship) have received fundings (the average amount $ 230) A vocational training plan was created to support the entrepreneurship In the bateyes, exists a great number of micro-entrepreneurship to strength and promote. The opportunity to access to a micro-credit has engaged the most vulnerable population (Haitian migrants, women, and people without documentation) who usually do not have access to formal credits. Negative previous experiences in the bateyes with community savings groups and the extreme poverty conditions of the batey population led UNDP/MUDE to prioritize micro-credit activities with both individually and collectively. 2.2: Provided educational opportunities for 1800 individuals. 800 beneficiaries have access to literacy courses. 1,000 children / girls aged 6 to 14 have access to learning support programs. 152 adolescents of years (50% girls) are participating in literacy classes in 10 communities of San Pedro de Macoris. 629 children between 6 and 14 years old (50% girls) have access to literacy and mathematics classes (329 in San Pedro and 300 in the south) in 20 communities (14 in San Pedro and 6 in the region south). The high levels of illiteracy in adolescents led UNICEF to focus the literacy programs to this population in order to increase their educational opportunities and reduce school dropout. Adult population, although small, also participates in literacy classes carried out by ASCALA and World Vision. Children without documents are made vulnerable to school absenteeism and dropout because birth certificates are often required to attend schools. Local partners, as ASCALA in San Pedro de Macoris and World Vision in the south region, are identifying children without documents to involve them in the education projects and documentation initiatives. Partnership with the government s National Literacy Programme ( Quisqueya Aprende Contigo ) is crucial for the sustainability of these initiatives. It is necessary to train regularly the facilitators to strengthen their teaching skills and the use of educational materials, including 11

13 audiovisual materials. The collaboration with Technological Institute of Las Americas (ITLA), a prestigious training center in the country, will improve the facilitators skills in the use of audiovisual materials. 3.1: Built upon existing community social infrastructure to increase self sustaining access to food in the bateyes for at least 800 individuals and their families (4,000 direct beneficiaries) and their community (indirect beneficiaries). 800 families (4,000 people) are socially integrated with permanent access to nutritional food, 50% of these female-headed families. 2,000 people (500 families) have access to nutritional food through the 6 community food stores in San Pedro de Macorís. 26 families (15 in San Pedro and 11 in the south region) identified for implementing gardens and 6 community areas identified for implementation of community gardens in the southern region. In the original project, it was proposed to create 37 community food stores (one in each batey), however, because this activity requires the existence of strengthened community based organizations, which most of the bateyes do not have, this output is not realistic during the project life of 3 years. After a revision with ASCALA/UNHCR, it was proposed to create 8 community stores and strengthen 6 that already exist in San Pedro de Macoris, which will benefit 4,000 people by the end of the project. Because in the south region it have never been created community food stores, and there is no local partner with previous experience such as ASCALA, it is recommended to explore other options of food fair trade and to share the ASCALA s experience in the south region during the second year. Community food stores will form a cooperative in which will sell food produced by the family/community gardens and other local products supported by activities for the output : Provided secure access to maternity and pre/postnatal health care for 2,000 vulnerable women, whom it is calculated will each have at least 3 children, therefore an estimated 6,000 children will directly benefit from 2,000 of pregnant women with access to health care (checkup medical visits, daily supplements, nutritional screening) 102 volunteers (87% women) are participating in training workshops on health promotion, maternal and child nutrition and hygiene practices at home. 102% of the target of volunteers has The interventions during the first year were focused to develop capacities in the community volunteers though training workshops and strengthening the alliances with the Ministry of Health at a local level. 12

14 health care. 6,000 children under one (1) year completed their vaccination programs. been trained in the first year of the project. 4.2:Reduced of adolescent pregnancy and HIV transmission through the training of 250 peer educators who will provide faceto face training to at least 12 adolescents each, benefiting a total of 3,000 adolescents Number of adolescents trained on life skills to prevent early pregnancy and HIV and Aids. Number of adolescents engaged through peer educators. 140 teenagers from 20 bateyes have been trained to multiply their knowledge and share it with the community (59% of the progress of the first year). 5 public health agencies have worked with teenagers of the community to support the learning processes. The interventions during the first year were focused to develop capacities of the peer educators though training workshops and strengthening the alliances with the Ministry of Health at a local level. 4.3: Improved nutrition for at least 6,000 children. Number of children (0-5 years) with weight and height monitored. Number of children (0-5 years) with exclusive breastfeeding. 102 volunteers (87% women) are participating in training workshops on health promotion, maternal and child nutrition and hygiene practices at home (102% of the target of volunteers trained in the first year of the project). The interventions during the first year were focused to develop capacities of the community volunteers though training workshops and strengthening the alliances with the Ministry of Health at a local level. 5.1: Improved Disaster Management Skills through the design and implementation of community risk plans and first response management. Community teams structured and trained on disaster related risk management skills. Information has been gathered in reference to disaster risk management in 9 bateyes of the southern region. Because south region has a high risk to disasters, and the project started during the hurricane season, IDDI/UNDP prioritize the first year intervention in this geographic area Developed WATSAN infrastructure Map of WATSAN infrastructure in bateyes Number of Information has been gathered in reference to WASH facilities in 28 bateyes of San In the second year the mapping will be carry out in the south region. The project prioritizes community spaces (schools, community centers, 13

15 public WATSAN facilities improved Pedro de Macoris. clinics or community food stores) to access to water and sanitation facilities. Number of families involved in hygiene promotion. 5.3: Increase the use of renewable energy Number of watts installed and in operation in community centers. Information has been gathered in reference to energy facilities in 9 bateyes of the southern region. It is recommended to prioritize community spaces (schools, community centers, clinics or community food stores) to access to renewable energy Achievements as measured against stated objectives. Objective 1. Ensure that Haitians, Dominicans of Haitian descent, and Dominicans living in the bateyes are protected from threats to personal and political security. The project has contributed to the promotion of political security by providing documentation, legal assistant, psychological support, training and specialized workshops to the targeted population. The cooperation agreement signed up among local authorities and the three UN agencies, and the roundtable meeting on human security organized in the Central East University have promoted the protection from threats to personal and political security to the people living in the bateyes. Objective 2. Improve economic security by promoting the bateyes population s income generation capacity. Through the support of small entrepreneurship projects in the bateyes, vocational training and access to micro loans, the project has improved economic security and living standards. Objective 3. Decrease the high levels of food insecurity experienced by Haitians, Dominicans of Haitian descent and Dominicans living in the bateyes. The project has contributed to the decrease of food insecurity through the creations and strengthening of eight community stores, the promotion of fare trade, and the creation of food safety nets in the community. The strategy to build upon existing social infrastructure to increase self-sustaining access to food has promoted community participation and a sense of ownership. Objective 4. Advance health security for Haitians, Dominicans of Haitian descent and Dominicans living in the bateyes through increasing access to basic primary care and health education. Through the identification of community volunteers, the creation of the maternal and child health network, and the promotion of local workshops on prenatal care and breastfeeding, the project has contributed to increase access to basic primary health care of the community in the bateyes. The identification of adolescents to participate in the HIV prevention campaign and the partnership established with the Ministries of Health and Education has been a strategy to strengthen the project s impact in the selected bateyes. 14

16 Objective 5. Increase environmental security for Haitians, Dominicans of Haitian descent and Dominicans living in the bateyes such that they are better prepared for natural disasters, have access to clean water renewable energy. Environmental security has been promoted for the people living in the bateyes, through the identification of the threats, vulnerabilities, risks and capacities of 9 bateyes of the south, and the mapping of needs in WATSAN and energy infrastructure Implementation constraints, including plans for addressing them. A) Lack of a baseline before starting the implementation of the project. The project was designed based on data from the National Demographic and Health (DHS, 2007) and the assessments carried out by the UN agencies, however, there has been information gaps. Having access to a baseline data prior to the project design would have allowed to design more accurate results and indicators according to the needs of the target communities, and therefore a better strategy and budget allocation. The approved project included a baseline which was developed between June and October The baseline results, which will be made available in November 2013, will allow a better monitoring of the project, and will make the data available for the local authorities. B) Lack of coherence between the programmatic years of the implementing agencies (Jan- Dec) and the timeline of the Human Security Project (Oct-Oct). This has been one of the reasons for the delay in the implementation of the project. Future initiatives and projects should consider the UN agencies programmatic cycles of January December. C) Delay in project implementation. The project started with the hiring of the project coordinator in February 2013 with four months delay. The project requested a no-cost extension to the HSU, however, it was suggested to consider it in the last year of implementation. The implementing agencies and local partners have made great efforts in the design of the proposals and signing the agreements which were finally signed by July Partnership and inter-agency coordination has been crucial to advance the implementation of the first year. D) Long distances between target communities. The distance between bateye communities is large, and the absence of public transport forces the volunteers and beneficiaries to use private transport which is expensive. For this reason, during the first year of the project, it has been proposed to work in limited number of bateyes, and to gradually increase in numbers in subsequent years. E) Lack of local capacities on human security approach. The project includes capacity building in human security approach, however, in the Dominican Republic there are no experts who can provide this training. Following the suggestion of the HSU, the project hired an international expert who developed a series of educational activities with different audiences Lessons learned and Good Practices The collaborative work of local partners led to a greater inter-sectorial integration of the project. This collaboration has maximized the scope of interventions and financial and human resources available for the project. In this collaborative effort stands the strong 15

17 partnership between MUDE and ASCALA to work with the components of income generation and food security. At the same time the alliance between ASCALA, PMI and Caritas for the WATSAN components. The exchange of experiences among partners working for the same components in different geographical areas has been also promoted in the documentation and literacy component of the project. The human security concept has been positively received by local partners who have identified it as an added value to the implementation of the different dimensions of the project. This approach has contributed to a greater collaboration among organizations with different experiences. To ensure a comprehensiveness coordination of the project, an inter-agency technical committee has been formed, as well as a technical committee of local partners. For the design of the baseline of the project, a survey was designed with different modules linked to the five dimensions of the project. This baseline will set the key variables to understand the reality of the target population. It will also measure the degree of human security in the members of the community, and thus objectively measure the impact of the project at the end of the project cycle. An assessment on politic and personal security carried out by UNHCR in the south region showed the vulnerability of the bateyes population, the need to explore possibilities to increase the number of target communities, as well as the inter-agency efforts. At the same time, the local partners in the south region should be strengthened to improve their capacities. Hiring personnel with expertise in political security, economic security and food security, and his/her permanent presence in the south region will be a great contribution from the human security project Impact of key partnerships and inter-agency collaboration The two agreements signed with the local authorities of San Pedro de Macoris and Barahona have improved the coordination with governmental authorities. This agreement has also promoted a greater support for the population of the bateyes that has been historically discriminated against. The agreement with the Central East University indicates a positive progress in terms of realization of an academic institution about the reality of a population particularly discriminated against. This collaboration has enabled better access to key stakeholders, such as local authorities and the private sector. The collaboration of three UN agencies has contributed to a greater support and visibility of the issues of the targeted population with special emphasis on the undocumented people. The different mandates of the agencies have complimented the initial interventions undertaken by UNHCR to improve the quality of life of the target population in a comprehensive manner.. Collaboration with the international development agency Progressio in San Pedro de Macoris, through its expertise in food safety and supply chains, allowed a greater integration between the components of food security and economic security. 16

18 Partnership with the Latin American Technological Institute (ITLA) has been established to train facilitators from the literacy and after school programs, coordinated byunicef, in developing audiovisual materials. This occupational training will contribute to increase economic and educational opportunities for young people of the bateyes (UNDP objective). Also as a result of this course, two clips on the human security situation in the bateyes will be developed, which will be used as a tool for advocacy and promote human security concept. 5. FORTHCOMING ANNUAL WOK-PLAN Expected outputs Planned activities Time frame Agency Budget year 2 USD T1 T2 T3 T4 1.1.: Provided birth registry documents, national identification documents to both, Haitians and vulnerable Dominicans, passports and residencies to vulnerable Haitians. 1.2: Built a sense of community security by decreasing discrimination, improving cooperation between the bateyes and the surrounding communities and creating opportunities for interaction. 6,000 estimated beneficiaries including 60 trained radio professionals. 2.1.: Created, in partnership with community members, sustainable income generation mechanisms in 37 bateyes. 2.2: Provided educational opportunities for 1800 individuals. 3.1: Built upon existing community social infrastructure to increase self sustaining access to food in the bateyes for at least 800 individuals and their families (4,000 direct beneficiaries) and their community (indirect beneficiaries). 4.1: Provided secure access to maternity and pre/post natal health care for 2,000 vulnerable women, whom it is calculated will each have at least 3 children, therefore an estimated 6,000 children will directly benefit from health care. Ongoing documentation campaigns Provide legal assistance Advocacy campaigns. Local authorities and stakeholders roundtables Cross-cultural activities Radio spots Self-empowerment workshops. Vocational training programs and capacity building Solidarity Microfinance Project Literacy Courses Aftershcool programs Suport food stores in the community Family and community gardens Train health workers in the community. Improving health in coordination with local authorities Improving primary care units UNHCR UNDP UNICEF UNHCR UNICEF 145, , , ,

19 4.2:Reduced of adolescent pregnancy and HIV transmission through the training of 250 peer educators who will provide face to face training to at least 12 adolescents each, benefiting a total of 3,000 adolescents Prevention campaigns 4.3: Improved nutrition for at least 6,000 children. 5.1: Improved Disaster Management Skills through the design and implementation of community risk plans and first response management Developed WATSAN Infrastructure 5.3: Increase the use of renewable energy Map of Community threats, vulnerabilities, risks and capacities Create committee of community responses and risk reduction plan. Map of infrastructure in 37 batey WATSAN improve public facilities Hygiene Promotion Capacity building on the use of renewable energies UNICEF UNDP 257, Coordination Support UNDP 80, Monitoring and evaluation UNDP 25, Activities for the promotion of HS concept UNDP 20, Total estimated project cost 917, Estimated PSC 64, Total estimated funds 981,

20 6. RESOURCES AND FINANCIAL IMPLEMENTATION 6.1 Notes about Percentage of budgeted funds actually spent. Although the report covers the period between October October 2013, the project formally began in February 2013 with the recruitment of the coordination staff. The agreements were signed with the implementing partners in July This report reflects the Project implementation of only three months. The UN agencies fiscal year ends in December. Because this report covers periods only until October 2013, the report includes a percentage of implementation costs that are planned to be implemented before the end of the fiscal year in December. It is expected that for December 2013, the agencies would be implemented at least 70% of the Budget of the first year of the program. 7. PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES Video about the conditions of human security in the bateyes prior to project implementation. Sets of 25 professional photographs taken in the bateyes to communmicate the concept of human security through promotional materials and communication networks. Promotional materials about the concept of human security (brochure, poster and calendar in process) Lecture on the human security concept organisedat the Universidad Iberoamericana. Workshop on the human security concept and approach for the implementing partners. Conference on human security approach for United Nations staff. Training of adolescents on audiovisual technics to promote the human security concept. Figure 6. Workshop. Promoting Human Security concept among implementing partners. 19

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